The Three Failures of Performance Appraisal | People Performance Potential

first_img Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. The Three Failures of Performance Appraisal | People Performance PotentialShared from missc on 15 Apr 2015 in Personnel Today Read full article last_img

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Highly temporally resolved response to seasonal surface melt of the Zachariae and 79N outlet glaciers in northeast Greenland

first_imgThe seasonal response to surface melting of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream outlets, Zachariae and 79N, is investigated using new highly temporally resolved surface velocity maps for 2016 combined with numerical modeling. The seasonal speedup at 79N of 0.15 km/yr is suggested to be driven by a decrease in effective basal pressure induced by surface melting, whereas for Zachariae its 0.11 km/yr seasonal speedup correlates equally well with the breakup of its large ice mélange. We investigate the influence 76 km long floating tongue at 79N, finding it provides little resistance and that most of it could be lost without impacting the dynamics of the area. Furthermore, we show that reducing the slipperiness along the tongue-wall interfaces produces a velocity change spatially inconsistent with the observed seasonal speedup. Finally, we find that subglacial sticky spots such as bedrock bumps play a negligible role in the large-scale response to a seasonally enhanced basal slipperiness of the region.last_img read more

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Russia: Central Naval Museum Cannot Afford Proper Service for Cruiser Avrora

first_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Museum September 17, 2012 Russia: Central Naval Museum Cannot Afford Proper Service for Cruiser Avrora View post tag: Navy View post tag: Cannot View post tag: Afford Staff of the Central Naval Museum cannot provide proper service for cruiser Avrora which in the nearest future may lead to destruction of the…(rusnavy)[mappress]Source: Russian Navy, September 17, 2012 View post tag: Central View post tag: Cruisercenter_img Back to overview,Home naval-today Russia: Central Naval Museum Cannot Afford Proper Service for Cruiser Avrora View post tag: Avrora View post tag: Service View post tag: proper Training & Education View post tag: Naval View post tag: Russia Share this articlelast_img read more

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An insecure Union?

first_imgFears about security at the Oxford Union have intensified after a series of incidents including the theft of money and claims of assault on the premises.Staff and committee members have also complained that they have been placed in dangerous and unpleasant confrontations with intruders due to a lax entrance policy.President-Elect James Dray raised the issue of security in last week’s committee meeting, stating that there is “a huge security problem with numerous thefts from the gardens and the buildings, which makes the buildings unpleasant to be in during the day.”This week, the debating society’s standing committee was told that recent thefts included Bodleain cards, membership cards, and money belonging to treasurer Nouri Verghese.When asked why the Society’s sophisticated card scanners were not being used to screen those entering Union buildings, President Corey Dixon was forced to admit that they had been stolen.One member of staff at the Union, who wished to remain anonymous, said that although security has improved in the last year, progress had been slow. He said that a major worry for Union staff is a homeless drop-in centre, the Gatehouse, almost opposite to the entrance. “We often have to turf out alcoholics during the day; I can only imagine it would be worse at night.”Secretary Laura Winwood admitted she had also been forced into an unpleasant confrontation with intruders in Union buildings. She reported to the Standing Committee an incident in which she had tried to apprehend two men she believed to be potential thieves in the courtyard, saying “They grabbed me by the arm and threw me back. They were quite big and thuggish. There really is a problem”.Other staff members said they had felt threatened by homeless individuals who entered the building during the holidays. During the committee meeting it emerged that there is only one full time security guard at the Union, despite the premises having two main entrances. Bursar Lindsay Warne said “standing committee approved a £9,000 reduction in our security budget, which as we pointed out at the time meant we had to fire somebody.”Dixon said he was “very happy to pass a motion to hire another door staff”, but no decision has yet been taken. Last week he proposed a poll of Union members to gauge response to their money being spent on security measuresStaff, however, criticized his decision not to consult them on any possible changes.An employee of the Union said “It seems obvious to consult the staff about security, after all, we are the ones most affected.”Union members seem surprised at the lack of security around the buildings and the level of crime reported, with one commenting “for the fee that we’re paying, you’d expect that they’d at least be able to look after my bag. There might be an open gate policy, but at the end of the day it’s a private building. It should be safer.”Several of the thefts occurred during Presidential Drinks. There are concerns that non-members are often allowed to attend the weekly invitation-only event, with librarian Stuart Cullen admitting that he knew some who had been allowed to stay.Dray told standing committee members that he had looked into the possibility of an automatically operated gate with an attached scanner able to read Union membership card barcodes. He added that the Cambridge Union operated a similar system, and claimed to have spoken to a company who believed they would be able to make such a system worked.However, when asked for details, he stated that he was unsure of the specifics of the plan. “This isn’t something I’ve looked into or investigated properly,” he said.Dray also said that he felt Union members might oppose such plans, saying “a number of members have said in emails to me that they opposed any gate”.There have also been concerns over uncontrolled admission of members of other societies during joint events at Frewin Court, and the Union’s difficulties in controlling their behaviour. Bursar Warne said she felt that a proposed Oxford University Conservative Association event on the premises was likely to be particularly troubling.“On past experience, they will cause trouble, and they will throw up everywhere”, she told committee members.last_img read more

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HATFIELD CONDUCTING TOWN HALL IN EVANSVILLE TODAY

first_imgState Rep. Ryan Hatfield (D-Evansville) invited area residents to join him at a town hall at 7 p.m. Thursday (March 23) to discuss the 2017 session of the Indiana General Assembly.The event will take place at the St. James Baptist Church, 1808 N. 4th Avenue.“As we head into the final weeks of the 2017 session, I want to give the people of Evansville a chance to make their feelings known about some of the major issues we are facing this session, including a new state budget, an infrastructure improvement plan, and improvements in public education,” Hatfield said.“I plan on giving those who attend an update on these critical issues, and hear from them about what they would like to see the Legislature accomplish before we finish our work in mid-April,” he continued.Hatfield has two more town halls scheduled in the weeks to come:April 8 at the Vanderburgh County Central Library, 200 SE Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd.April 25 at the Potter’s Wheel, 333 Jefferson Avenue. FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Steve’s Cakes gains keys to Pallas

first_imgSteve’s Cakes in Antrim, which produces homemade cakes and traybakes, is to supply one of Ireland’s leading foodservice organisations, Pallas Foods.The deal came about through an initiative called Invest NI, part-funded by the European Regional Development Fund, which holds ’Meet the Buyer’ events. These events allow smaller companies the oppor-tunity to meet with the buyers for major foodservice and retail businesses on a one-to-one basis.last_img

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Search for Ed School dean begins

first_imgDear Colleagues and Friends,As you know, Kathy McCartney will be concluding her service as dean of the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) at the end of the spring term, having been named to become president of Smith College next July.  Kathy has led the Ed School with extraordinary energy and effectiveness since 2005.  It will be one of my highest priorities in the time ahead to identify an outstanding successor to Kathy and to help sustain the School’s momentum and progress through this time of transition.  Many thanks in advance to all of you whose efforts I know will be essential toward that end.Consistent with Harvard’s usual practice in dean searches, I have invited a cross-section of the Ed School’s senior faculty to work with me as an advisory group for the search.  I am grateful to the following HGSE faculty members for agreeing to serve: Monica Higgins, Nancy Hill, Thomas Kane, Robert Kegan, Nonie Lesaux, Bridget Terry Long, Richard Murnane, Jack Shonkoff, and Hiro Yoshikawa.  The group will also include several other Harvard faculty members with complementary perspectives on the work of the Ed School: Christopher Avery (Kennedy School), Amy Edmondson (Business School), Jennifer Hochschild (FAS – Government), Lawrence Katz (FAS – Economics), and Dutch Leonard (Business School/Kennedy School).  We will meet regularly in the coming months both to consider the opportunities and challenges facing the School and to discuss prospective candidates for dean.The advisory group’s work will be part of a wider outreach process to which I hope many of you will contribute.   Provost Alan Garber and I will pursue opportunities to solicit advice from the broader faculty, students, staff, alumni, and knowledgeable others.  I know from past searches how much the process will benefit from such informed, candid counsel.  With that in mind, I encourage you to send me your thoughts about HGSE and its future, about the key qualities to seek in a new dean, and about individuals at Harvard or elsewhere whom you believe should be considered as possible candidates for dean.You may send your observations and nominations, in confidence, by e-mail to [email protected] or by letter addressed to me at Massachusetts Hall.  I will read all your thoughts with interest and care.  You should also feel free to be in touch with Marc Goodheart ([email protected]) or Stephanie Gumble ([email protected]), who will be assisting me with the search.Warm wishes for the new year — and thanks for your advice during this time of transition and opportunity for the HGSE.Sincerely,Drew Faustlast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s resident assistants create safe spaces posters for display in Le Mans Hall

first_imgA piece of white computer paper stands out amidst a sea of bright decorations taped to Saint Mary’s residence assistant (RA) Ivol Frasier’s door in Le Mans Hall, reading, “My room is hate free,” and “Please help me keep Le Mans Hall safe for everyone.” Stickers of the LGBTQ pride flag and transgender pride flag, as well as the accessibility and feminist movement symbols, surround the message. Similarly decorated posters are tacked to other doors in the hallway. Maeve Filbin | The Observer Ivol Frasier, a junior RA at Saint Mary’s whose door is pictured here, recently helped begin a campaign whereby Le Mans Hall residents display signs on their doors encouraging tolerance and acceptance of underrepresented groups. Frasier has been working in collaboration with fellow RA Dorothy Le.These posters were the result of a project led by Frasier, a junior RA, and other members of residence life.“My room is hate free,” she said. “And so it’s just kind of enforcing that this is a safe space for me and for everyone else.”RAs are asked to construct four programs exploring the core values of the College — learning, faith and spirituality, community and justice — over the course of the semester. Frasier said she and senior RA Dorothy Le decided to collaborate in a project highlighting diversity and justice in residence life.“We were thinking, ‘What are some ways that we can promote diversity and justice that hasn’t really been done before?’” Frasier said. “Because there have been projects with cupcakes and diversity and you just decorate your cupcakes and that doesn’t really work.”While scrolling through Pinterest boards, Frasier and Le found templates for dorm posters that read, “My room is hate free. Please help keep ____ Hall safe,” and were inspired to adapt them for their own project. They invited their residents to decorate the posters with stickers representing symbols of their own identity.“And so we just thought it’d be a great way to get the overall feel of Le Mans to feel a little more welcoming and inclusive because I know that for me, as a member of the LGBT community, I know that coming here, I was very scared and very afraid and didn’t know if I’d be able to find my people,” Frasier said. “So I think it’s really important to have that visibility of the people who are safe and that Saint Mary’s is safe. And so we’re like, ‘OK, door decs, that’s a great idea.’”The sticker sheets offered different designs with symbols for feminism, coexist and disability accessibility, Frasier said.“One of my favorites is this world that’s held up by hands of different colors,” she said. “And so we tried to just include as many different areas of diversity as we could in these sticker sheets. And [the residents] could just pick and choose which ones they wanted to use. And almost everyone who came picked one of everything, and I’m like, ‘Look at you guys, spread the love.’ I love it.”Frasier said she’s not exactly sure what a safe Le Mans Hall looks like, but hopes it would feel inclusive and accepting, while promoting the visibility of diverse populations on campus.“So making it known that there are people of color who live here, or LGBT students who live here and just — not necessarily going out of your way — but making it visible and known that you’re safe to be who you are here,” she said.At Saint Mary’s, a Catholic college with a predominantly white undergraduate enrollment, this inclusion has to be intentional, Frasier said.“At least for me coming in as someone who’s a little different, it’s like, ‘Oh, I don’t know if I’m going to be OK here’ to just kind of having that visibility and that awareness that other people are here,” she said. “They’re welcome here and they belong here.”As a psychology major, Frasier said she has studied the dynamics between an “in” group and an “out” group.“And so when you feel like you’re singled out or you feel like you’re different and everyone else sees you as different, you’re more likely to underperform,” Frasier said. “So it’s really important to celebrate and accept diverse populations, but then also let them know that that doesn’t define them. It’s really important to make sure that even though you are a little different than the stereotypical Belle, you still can be successful here and we see you and we support you.”The posters began as an invitation to heightened awareness, and have now started conversations about safe spaces on campus, Frasier said.“If you don’t know where a safe space is, you don’t know that it exists,” she said. “So even if it’s just another student or just a resident or just a friend, at least you know, you have that one place where you can go and celebrate yourself and be safe. And so even if you feel unsafe in the classroom, you know that you have one person you can go to and then I know having on my door I hope that it will bring people to me who feel unsafe or that they need help, so that I can direct them to resources and help them have a better college experience.”Junior KatieBeth Hollman, sitting beneath the bisexual pride flag hanging over her desk, said the posters encourage acceptance in Le Mans Hall.“I’m a member of the LGBT community … so personally, I like seeing all of the ‘Keep Le Mans Hall safe’ things because they’re really welcoming,” Hollman said. “And like I know a bunch of them have pride stickers on them, and so it kind of makes me feel welcome and makes me like not feel prejudiced against.”Hollman and her roommate Mary Blake tacked their versions of the sign to their door to project that same sense of welcome to others in the hall, Hollman said.“I put it on my door because I want other people to feel the same way,” she said. “So like if there’s someone else — and not even necessarily gay or bi or whatever — but even just like different beliefs or different mental illnesses or different disabilities, I want them to know that I’m supporting them, and that they aren’t being prejudiced against.”Frasier said she thinks Saint Mary’s has made a lot of pushes towards inclusion, and highlighted clubs such as the Black Student Association and Sexuality and Gender Alliance. However, the College could do more to promote these groups on campus and make sure they are receiving the proper resources, Frasier added.“But of course, there’s always room for improvement,” she said. “There’s always room for more.”Tags: Hate Free, Le Mans Hall, Residence Life, Resident Assistant, safe spaces, visibilitylast_img read more

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Tix Now On Sale to See Vanessa Hudgens-Led Gigi on B’way

first_img Based on the 1944 novel by Colette, Gigi was first adapted for the Broadway stage in 1951 by Anita Loos, with an unknown Audrey Hepburn in the title role. Subsequently Alan Jay Lerner (screenplay and lyrics) and Frederick Loewe (music) adapted the material for the 1958 movie musical, winner of nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture. In 1973, the tuner played 103 performances on Broadway with Karin Wolfe as Gigi and Daniel Massey as Gaston, earning a Tony Award for Best Original Score. Related Shows Set during the turn of the 20th century, Gigi tells the story of a free-spirited teenage girl living in Paris who is groomed (in the custom of her family) to serve as a companion to a bored, wealthy playboy until the pair realize they have fallen in love. The show features the memorable tunes “Thank Heaven For Little Girls,” “I Remember It Well,” “The Night They Invented Champagne,” “It’s a Bore,” “Say a Prayer for Me Tonight” and more. Thank heaven! Tickets are now available to see the Vanessa Hudgens-led Gigi on the Great White Way. The tuner, which played a pre-Broadway engagement at the Kennedy Center, will begin previews on March 19 at the Neil Simon Theatre and officially open on April 8. The Eric Schaeffer-helmed production, adapted by Heidi Thomas, also stars Corey Cott, Howard McGillin, Steffanie Leigh, Victoria Clark and Dee Hoty. Check out Gigi’s stars talking about the revival in Broadway.com’s video below. The cast also includes Cameron Adams, Kathryn Boswell, Max Clayton, Madeleine Doherty, Ashley Blair Fitzgerald, Hannah Florence, Alison Jantzie, Brian Ogilvie, James Patterson, Justin Prescott, Jeffrey C. Sousa, Manny Stark, Tanairi Sade Vazquez, Richard White, Amos Wolff and Ashley Yeater. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 21, 2015 View Comments Gigilast_img read more

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Study: New York State regulators are ignoring battery-storage trends

first_imgAcker said that the study had its merit in showing that there is an opportunity for energy storage to replace traditional peaker plants, even under 2013’s conservative load profile assumption.“We are at a point where energy storage can replace peakers in many, many situations. We want make sure that we do get this right, so that we’re able to really take advantage of the benefits of the storage technology,” Acker said.More: New York peaker study underestimates storage potential FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Utility Dive:The New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium (NY-BEST) on Friday submitted comments criticizing state regulators’ July 1 unit-by-unit peaker study, saying it underestimated how many peakers could be replaced by battery storage.The Department of Public Service’s study identified at least 275 MW of peaking units, or about 6% of the total rated capacity of New York’s peaking fleet, as potential candidates for replacement with six‐hour energy storage. This number increases to over 500 MW when using eight-hour duration storage.“There’s a lot of momentum right now for the replacement of large-scale assets on the grid with storage, and that’s why these studies are so important,” Bill Acker, executive director of NY-BEST, told Utility Dive.NY-BEST, a nonprofit trade association representing 175 member organizations, identified three major concerns with the methodology of the peakers study, according to its filing:The study ignores the temporal characteristics of traditional peakers that are more restrictive and less flexible than energy storage resources, and assumes that peaker operation is solely determined by system reliability needs;It is examining snapshots of individual units in isolation without a system model, or taking into account other operational factors at a given time, can create misleading results; And load shapes and peaking needs will change dramatically as renewable energy increases, making the Study’s use of 2013 data inappropriate to analyze future New York peaking needs. Study: New York State regulators are ignoring battery-storage trendslast_img read more

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