SNMG2 Departs for Op Active Endeavour

first_img View post tag: Navy Back to overview,Home naval-today SNMG2 Departs for Op Active Endeavour View post tag: Active Endeavour July 24, 2015 Having concluded a successful port visit, Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2) got underway on July 22 from Palma de Mallorca to support NATO’s Operation ACTIVE ENDEAVOUR.The Group’s flagship German frigate FGS HAMBURG was joined in Palma by the Canadian frigate HMCS WINNIPEG, the Spanish frigate ESPS SANTA MARIA, and the Spanish supply ship ESPS CANTABRIA.The crews and staff of SNMG2 have conducted coordination meetings, focusing on the operational, technical and logistics preparations for the at-sea period ahead. During the port visit, Palma residents also had the opportunity to visit the ships and meet with the Sailors during two “Open Ships” periods aboard the four ships.Rear Admiral Klein said:Standing NATO Maritime Group TWO is flying NATO colours in the Mediterranean again.Upon getting underway, SNMG 2 immediately started with force integration training and testing operational procedures. This preparation will be vital to the Group’s support of NATO’s Operation ACTIVE ENDEAVOUR, which began in October 2001.[mappress mapid=”16554″]Image: MARCOM View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Naval View post tag: europecenter_img View post tag: Departs Authorities Share this article View post tag: OP View post tag: SNMG2 SNMG2 Departs for Op Active Endeavourlast_img read more

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Display Ship Barry goes to scrapyard

first_img May 6, 2016 Back to overview,Home naval-today Display Ship Barry goes to scrapyard View post tag: US Navy Display Ship Barry goes to scrapyard After more than 30 years as the display ship at the Washington Navy Yard and its ineligibility for listing in the National Register of Historic Places, Display Ship Barry was designated for disposal last year.Now, the ship must be removed before renovation of Frederick Douglass Memorial Bridge as current plans call for a fixed-span bridge that would land-lock the ship.The U.S. Navy’s Supervisor of Salvage and Diving (SUPSALV) is supporting ship preparations and towing of arry from Pier 2 at the Washington Navy Yard (WNY) May 7.The ship will be towed to the Naval Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in Philadelphia to await its dismantling.“With the arrival this week of the 400-ton crane, the team rigged the primary and emergency tow bridles on the bow of the ship and we removed masts to reduce the ship’s air draft as part of final preparations,” said Jim Ruth, SUPSALV towing subject matter expert.The ship’s departure coincides with the spring tide and is expected to raise the water level to 3.98 feet above mean high tide. After crossing the shoal at Hains Point and passing through the opened Fredrick Douglass Memorial Bridge, the tow will proceed under the Woodrow Wilson Bridge.The remainder of the route includes the transit south on the Potomac to the Chesapeake Bay. Then the ship will travel north, the length of the Chesapeake, to the Chesapeake and Delaware (C&D) Canal. After exiting the C&D, the tow will proceed up the Delaware River to Philadelphia.Barry was the third Forrest Sherman-class destroyer built and the fourth vessel to bear the name of the Revolutionary War naval hero, Commodore John Barry. Commissioned Sept. 7, 1956, Barry served 26 years in the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets.The ship supported the 1958 Marine and Army airborne unit landing in Beirut, Lebanon. In 1962, Barry was a member of the task force that quarantined Cuba in response to evidence that Soviet missiles had been installed on the island. The ship was decommissioned Nov. 5, 1982 after 26 years of service.“As an organization, NAVSEA is uniquely qualified to handle this mission,” said William Boozer, project lead and director, Inactive Ships. “However, moving this historic ship safely and efficiently also required the assistance of Naval District Washington, Naval Support Activity Washington, U.S. Coast Guard, Naval Facilities Command, Naval Inactive Ships Maintenance Office Philadelphia, and various NAVSEA Technical Warrant Holders.”center_img View post tag: Display Ship Barry DD 933 Share this article Authoritieslast_img read more

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Hall need Ielpo to save them from defeat

first_imgCHERWELL school pitches are often the venue for hard fought conker fights, although they have rarely witnessed a battle of this intensity.Before the game, both sides were eager to climb up the table, having dropped points in their first two games. In reality, this determination resulted in a scrappy affair, with neither side content with the eventual 2-2 score line.The match was played with an astounding physicality, with Teddy Hall’s eager midfield assuming early dominance over their opponents. Following a strong tackle from Hall captain John Waldron, Mike Sopp was able to put the away side in to the lead, capitalising on a moment of hesitancy from the Wadham keeper. Despite the home side maintaining possession, Hall continued to pose difficulties, with Frost and Clarfelt missing well-crafted opportunities on the counter attack. At the other end Hall’s goalkeeper, Nicola Ielpo, was proving to be a greater obstacle than his size would suggest. His commanding presence dominated his modest surroundings, and his full stretch dive saved a powerful shot from Bruno Versailles, only minutes after Hall had earned the lead. Ielpo is comparatively small for a goalkeeper, although he is undoubtedly used to the bigger stage, having once played in the San Siro Stadium in Milan. With the experienced pairing of Waldron and Lefanu in front of him, he will not expect to concede too many goals this season, providing his team do not fall foul of the complacency that led to Wadham equalising before half time. Teddy Hall restored their lead quickly after the break, when a well weighted through ball awoke sleeping giant, Wilfred Frost. The hit man responded with a perfect finish, tapping the ball passed the Wadham keeper to make it 2-1. Having gained the lead once again, captain John Waldron will bemoan the second wave of complacency that broke over Hall. Instead of pushing forward for another goal, the Hall players allowed Wadham to gain momentum, before proving incapable of preventing Bruno Versailles from poking the ball over Ielpo’s outstretched arms. Following Wadham’s goal, the tension between the two sides heightened, with neither willing to accept a point apiece. In between a series of fouls (most of which were committed by Hall’s right back), there were further chances at either end. Wadham’s keeper was fortunate in seeing the ball bounce off his crossbar and on to his head, before going out of play, whilst Versailles’ long range effort came perilously close to clinching the lead in the dying seconds. Wadham will regret wasting late opportunities to gain all three points, particularly as are set to face a very confident St. Anne’s on Friday. Teddy Hall, on the other hand, will hope to hang on to their keeper for all college fixtures, although it seems likely that he will abandon college level sport to appear in a university shirt before too long.last_img read more

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News story: RWM attend 2018 LGA Conference

first_imgRadioactive Waste Management (RWM) is this week (3-5 July) attending the Local Government Association (LGA) Annual Conference and Exhibition in Birmingham to listen to the views of community representatives and explain its role in working in partnership with communities for a safer future. RWM’s mission is to deliver a UK geological disposal facility (GDF) for radioactive waste.RWM wants to work closely with Local Authorities and community representatives who are likely to play a significant role in the process to find a suitable site for a GDF. The results of public consultations held earlier this year are now being used to help shape the policy which will outline the role communities will play in the process.Ann McCall, Siting & Engagement Director for RWM, said: We are delighted to be here to listen to the views of community representatives as we progress this vital programme on behalf of society.last_img read more

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Element Music Festival Sees 6 Sets Of SCI, Reunion Of Garaj Mahal, And Oteil Burbridge Sit-Ins [Audio/Photos]

first_imgSetlist: String Cheese Incident | Element Music Festival | Snug Lake Amphitheatre | Princeton, BC | 8/5/2017Set One: Dirk, Cedar Laurels, How Mountain Girls Can Love, Blue Bossa, Can’t Wait Another Day > Best Feeling > Valley Of The JigSet Two: Lester Poem > Shantytown, Black And White > IIWII Reprise, Impressions* > Drums, Get Tight, Let’s Go OutsideEncore: I Know You Rider* featuring Oteil Burbridge & Fareed Haque Element Music Festival 2017 | Snug Lake Amphitheatre | Princeton, BC | Photos: Jake Sherman Over the weekend, String Cheese Incident took to Princeton, British Columbia for their take-over of Element Music Festival. The festival hosted at Snug Lake Amphitheatre was highly anticipated, tapping Oteil Burbridge as Artist-As-Large in addition to boasting six sets by the host band, the long-awaited reunion of Garaj Mahal, two sets by Steve Kimock & Friends, and performances by Genetics, Five Alarm Funk, and more. North of the American border, this year, Element made it on the map, with Americans and Canadians alike flocking to the intimate Canadian festival from August 3rd through 6th. As previously noted in a Live For Live Music interview with String Cheese’s own Michael Kang, Element Music Festival was an exciting new venture for the band. The Colorado-born group had not made it north of the United States border since the now-defunct Pemberton Festival, and Cheese had high hopes for shaping the event into one of its many Cheese-centric festival experiences like Electric Forest and Hulaween.EXCLUSIVE: Michael Kang Talks Element Music Festival, Koch Brothers, Algae, And MoreAs Kang noted, “For us, it’s definitely like charting new territory. It’s going to be interesting going back. There are definitely a lot of new fans, people who have never heard of us. . . . We put a lot of energy into wanting to have these experiences that people can come to and be like, “All right! I get it!” This is what SCI wants to do as a concert-type experience. [Events like Electric Forest, Hulaween, or Horning’s Hideout] were very intentionally curated in the way we wanted them to be done. . . . [Element Music Festival is] gonna be something that we can hopefully put into our repertoire and continue to do with our family up there.”String Cheese Incident more than delivered on their promise on curating a spectacular festival experience, one that hopefully continues to develop a community and grow in years to come. String Cheese’s own six sets saw the band in proper form and also featured sit-ins from Burbridge and Fareed Haque of Garaj Mahal, an acclaimed guitarist who has previously performed with Cheese’s Jason Hann as a rotating member of his side project Rhythmatronix, across the weekend.However, String Cheese’s own performances were by no means the only exceptional musical moments of the weekend. After breaking up following their New Year’s Eve run welcoming in 2011, the wildly diverse jazz-fusion quartet Garaj Mahal returned to the stage after a near-seven year hiatus. Other highlights of the weekend included an impromptu daytime bass set from Burbridge, Kai Eckhardt, and Bobby Vega and an intimate, late-night Grateful Dead-inspired set from Steve Kimock & Friends, which featured Steve Kimock, Burbridge, Vega, Jeff Chimenti, and Kimock’s son, John Kimock. The late-night Steve Kimock & Friends set also saw Michael Kang sit-in during a thirty-minute rendition of “Birdsong,” with the set taking place in a barn holding around 300 people under the light of the full moon.You can take a listen to the audio from String Cheese Incident’s six sets at Element Music Festival below, courtesy of Eytan Bernet. Also, don’t forget to check out photos from Jake Sherman of this magical weekend.Setlist: String Cheese Incident | Element Music Festival | Snug Lake Amphitheatre | Princeton, BC | 8/4/2017Set One: Looking Glass > Rhum N’ Zouc, Purple Strains, 45th Of November, Sweet Spot, Close Your Eyes > BelieveSet Two: Desert Dawn, Joyful Sound > Rumble, Nothing But Flowers, Pack It Up, One Step Closer, It Is What It Is > BollyMunsterEncore: Quinn, The Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn) Setlist: String Cheese Incident | Element Music Festival | Snug Lake Amphitheatre | Princeton, BC | 8/6/2017Set One: I Saw The Light, Panama Red, Moonflower, Betray The Dark, Suntan, Wake Up > Black Clouds, DealSet Two: Beautiful, Sand Dollar > Drums > Sirens, Give Me The Love, Way Back Home > Restless WindEncore: Don’t Let Go*, Good Times Around The Bend* featuring Oteil Burbridge Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Pandemic helps set new dean’s priorities

first_img Dental School student Ryan Lisann is ready to teach local kids about oral health Related Getting his teeth into the community Something to smile about William V. Giannobile, D.M.Sc. ’96, P.D. ’96, assumed his role as dean of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) on Sept. 1. A prominent educator and leader in the field of periodontology, Giannobile shares his vision for the School, as well as his observations about beginning his deanship in the throes of a pandemic.Q&AWilliam V. GiannobileHSDM: Starting as a new dean during a pandemic comes with a host of challenges, could you describe how you’ll navigate these challenges in the near term?Giannobile: All of us have been significantly impacted by the pandemic. In particular, dental education and clinical care have been hit hard. I am extremely grateful to Interim Dean Vicki Rosen and the HSDM leadership team for navigating through some of the toughest parts of the crisis. They took important measures to protect our patients and our community. We will continue to focus on the safety of our students, faculty, and staff delivering clinical care in our clinics, while at the same time providing an excellent virtual learning environment for those students learning from home.Research was also significantly affected with the shutdown of clinical and basic science research efforts. It has been very encouraging to see these activities ramp up again. Harvard has taken proactive approaches to protect our community with increased testing of our students, faculty, and staff who remain on-site. Our dental teams are involved in innovations in diagnostic testing including point-of-care testing with saliva diagnostics. Starting on Sept. 1, my biggest priority is working with School leadership to continue to support our clinical and educational efforts so that we can optimize our ability to further research, teaching, and clinical care in the face of the pandemic.HSDM: What other priorities will you focus on at HSDM?Giannobile: I have identified several areas to assess the landscape at HSDM. This will include launching a climate survey that will take a fresh look at the current climate for our faculty, staff, and students. Promoting excellence through diversity and inclusion will be an important focus for me and for the HSDM community. We will begin the process of outlining a strategic plan and goals. This will be a grassroots effort involving faculty, staff, students, alumni, and HSDM-HMS [Harvard Medical School] affiliates. We will also look at initiatives for industrial-academic partnerships, dental care delivery in collaboration with affiliates, and development-related activities to promote a better cost structure for dental students. In the areas of research and discovery, we will look to strengthen our efforts in regenerative medicine, head and neck oncology, and computational medicine and the microbiome, among other emerging areas of research. The School also has exciting research in many areas such as the Initiative to Integrate Oral Health and Medicine, developmental biology, and digital dentistry that will continue to be supported.,HSDM: As the School’s 11th dean in its more than 150-year history, what will define your leadership?Giannobile: I will do my best to advance the wonderful legacy of the Harvard School of Dental Medicine into the next decade. Given the many global opportunities for outreach and promotion of the School, I will work to promote the School through continuing education, community and global outreach through collaborations in the developing world, and by encouraging student and faculty exchanges to enhance HSDM’s reach internationally. HSDM will continue to serve as a role model of the good will of dental health care providers and scholars to advance oral health care delivery.As a servant leader, I am one who strives to support those surrounding me for our shared purpose. I will work collaboratively with our School and University leadership to support the University’s vision for continued excellence of the dental school as a valued stakeholder in the University’s biomedical research and health care enterprise. HSDM will continue to train the next generation of leadership in dental medicine to advance the field. I will strive to be inclusive, promote diversity, equity, and integrity as a part of my day-to-day workings in collaboration with the leadership team. I hope to promote a culture whereby members of the HSDM community are enthusiastic and engaged in all aspects of their work, and continue to make the School the exemplar for dental education and research. Creating an environment where personal and professional success are important for all those in our community will help us work together to promote the advancement of dental education, clinical care, research, and societal impact.,HSDM: What do you see as HSDM’s strongest assets?Giannobile: One of our strongest assets is the high quality of students who come to HSDM for their education and training. I am so impressed by the backgrounds and experiences of our entering students. They continue to inject an enthusiasm that motivates everyone at the School. While HSDM is one of the smallest dental schools in the country, it is surrounded by the most robust academic biomedical research enterprise in the world. Being able to partner with entities such as Harvard Medical School, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the hospitals, the Forsyth Institute, the Wyss Institute, as well as the private sector in biotechnology, makes for a rich environment like no other. This infrastructure provides strong partnerships for the talented staff and faculty that work at Harvard. Reason to smile While our students are one of our greatest assets, the cost of dental education has outstripped inflation so dramatically that the quality of students who attend U.S. dental schools is greatly affected by their ability to afford a top education. Offering tuition assistance in the form of scholarships and grant support needs to be a priority to continue to attract the very best and brightest to HSDM and reduce debt and stress for our students. Currently, the Freeman, Grant and Franklin scholarship is a great example of a funding mechanism to encourage students from underrepresented backgrounds to come to HSDM. Alumna Mercedes Franklin and is a strong advocate for the support of underrepresented students. I intend to form a group to focus on developing more financial support for students who may not have had the resources to attend Harvard in the past.HSDM: Tell us about your background. What led you to a career in dental education?Giannobile: I was born in Chicago and my parents later moved our family (my three sisters and me) to a small farm in the Ozarks of Missouri. Early on as a young person, I was very curious about science and medicine. I had an inspiring mentor in my high school chemistry teacher who helped me get involved in international science and engineering fairs. I represented our region in these competitions and was exposed to many exciting areas within science as a high school student. He helped me gain the confidence to become a first-generation college student. Also, during college I was fortunate to work with a local dentist who had a farm in our area. He was encouraging about dentistry and balancing it with a good quality of life. After starting my dental school training, I spent my first summer at the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) as a predoctoral research fellow in the Bone Research Branch. There, I was engaged in research and discovery activities that cemented my interest in a career in dental education. Supportive faculty encouraged me to seek out advanced clinical and research training after dental school. I was accepted into a postdoctoral program at HSDM supported by the NIDCR Dentist-Scientist program. At HSDM, my interests were cultivated and advanced by eminent scholars and leaders in the oral health research field. These individuals were tremendous role models for me to become a clinician-scientist engaged in teaching, clinical care, and research.HSDM: What excites you about returning to HSDM to serve as dean?Giannobile: I feel honored and privileged to return to HSDM as dean to carry on the rich legacy of our past leaders including most recently, Interim Dean Vicki Rosen and Dean Bruce Donoff. I am excited to rejoin HSDM with its reputation as the premier institution for the advancement and innovation of dental education and research. As a young person, I never dreamed I would have such an amazing opportunity to receive an education at Harvard. At HSDM, I gained wonderful experience early in my career from my clinical training, as well as collaborations with the Forsyth Institute and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the expansive biotechnology community in Boston. My years at HSDM were the most transformative of my academic life. Now serving as dean, I hope to fully act on my life’s purpose: to inspire others to believe in themselves to be their best, with the goal of propelling new knowledge forward. Harvard Dental graduate finds his purpose in serving others New dean for School of Dental Medicine Alumnus William Giannobile coming from University of Michigan School of Dentistry School of Dental Medicine’s Class of 2024 gets a virtual welcome last_img read more

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SMC selects Emmy winner for commencement speaker

first_imgJudith Mayotte, a humanitarian, professor, author and Emmy Award-winning television producer, will deliver the 167th Commencement address at Saint Mary’s College on May 17, according to a press release.Mayotte and Helen Murray Free, a pioneering chemist, will receive honorary doctor of humanities degrees from the College at the ceremony.“I am delighted to recognize two exceptional women this year with honorary degrees from Saint Mary’s College,” Saint Mary’s College President Carol Ann Mooney said. “Their backgrounds and achievements fit perfectly with our dreams for our graduates.“Judith Mayotte is an internationally-recognized humanitarian who has spent her life working to affect positive change for refugees and others. Helen Murray Free’s discoveries in the field of chemistry improved health monitoring for people with diabetes and other conditions. I look forward to meeting them both and learning more about their extraordinary lives.”Jerome McElroy, Saint Mary’s economics professor and close friend of Mayotte, praised Mayotte for exemplifying a life of dedicated service.“From her Midwest roots in Wichita, Kan., through her remarkable career from convent, to TV journalism, academia and Cape Town, South Africa, Judith Ann Mayotte has demonstrated a life of unstinting excellence in service to the marginalized of the world,” McElroy said.In the 1960s, Mayotte taught in the inner cities of Los Angeles, Kansas City and Milwaukee as a Sister of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, McElroy said.In the next two decades, Mayotte worked as a television producer in Chicago and won an Emmy award for writing and producing the ‘Washington’ segment of Turner Broadcasting’s Emmy and Peabody Award winning documentary series, “Portrait of America,” McElroy said.In 1989, through a grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Mayotte began a three-year research journey that took her to the refugee camps in Cambodia, Thailand, Eritrea, Sudan and Pakistan, McElroy said. This work documented the lives and constrained socio-economic conditions of countless people displaced by ethnic conflict and war and culminated in the book “Displaced People? The Plight of Refugees,” now considered the classic in its field.Through the years, Mayotte has lectured and written extensively on refugee and development issues. She served as Special Advisor on refugee issues and policy at the Department of State in the first Clinton Administration and as Senior Fellow of the Refugee Policy Group in Washington, McElroy said.Prior to working under the first Clinton Administration in 1994, Mayotte was Chairwoman of the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children, and served on the board of Refugees International, McElroy said.“Both are well-known advocacy organizations that took Mayotte to the field to assess refugee crisis and repatriation issues,” McElroy said.She has also held a number of academic posts including Women’s Chair in Humanistic Studies at Marquette University, adjunct professor at John Hopkins Nitze School of Advanced International Studies and co-director of Seattle University’s International Development Internship Program, McElroy said.In 2010, she was named the first Desmond Tutu Distinguished Chair in Global Understanding for the University of Virginia’s Semester at Sea, McElroy said.“[She] is, indeed, a woman of the world whose faith, purpose and determination have made a great difference in the world,” McElroy said.Tags: Emmy Award, Graduation, smc commencementlast_img read more

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University announces 2018 Commencement speaker

first_imgTags: 2018 Commencement, Fr. John Jenkins, Judge Sergio Moro, May 20th Judge Sergio Moro will deliver the 2018 Commencement address at the May 20 ceremony, according to an email sent to the Notre Dame student body Sunday night.Moro is a Brazilian jurist who has worked to combat corruption in his country, University President Fr. John Jenkins said in the email.“Earlier this month in Sao Paulo, Brazil, I presented Judge Moro with the Notre Dame Award, and found him a courageous, conscientious, humble public servant dedicated to justice and the common good,” Jenkins said in the email. “I asked him if he would come to address the graduates of 2018 at our Commencement, and he generously agreed.”Jenkins said in the email he encourages members of the Notre Dame community to inform themselves of Moro’s achievements.“Because his work has not been extensively reported in the media in this country, his is less a household name here than it is in Brazil,” he said in the email.Moro’s work — dedicated to exposing political corruption within Brazil — earned the name Operation Car Wash, according a Time magazine report. His contributions to a number of high profile cases revealed that lawmakers were accepting money in exchange for contracts with the state-run oil company, Petrobras, the report said, and as a result, hundreds of politicians were subjected to further investigation.Moro became a federal judge in 1995, one year after he earned his bachelor of law degree at the Maringa State University in his home state of Parana. He then enhanced his legal knowledge by studying abroad at Harvard Law School, and he received a Juris Doctor from the Federal University of Parana in 2002.When Jenkins presented the Notre Dame Award in Brazil, he said Moro exhibits exemplary behavior and showcases how to effectively promote justice, according to an National Public Radio transcript.“As a result of Dr. Moro and his team’s good work, Brazil, instead of being infamous for corruption, has become a beacon for the rest of the hemisphere on how to fight it,” Jenkins said in the transcript.last_img read more

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Fisher Hall traditions promote service, tight-knit community

first_imgEditor’s note: This article is one in a series profiling the dorms. Previous articles have covered dorms built before Fisher Hall.Since 1952, the friendly fishermen of Fisher Hall have lived out their motto of “All are welcome in this place.”“There’s a real spirit of brotherhood in the hall,” Fisher Rector Rick Mazzei said. “We stress that all are welcome here and we really mean that. It’s a diverse community and we all bring wonderful gifts to this community.” Observer File Photo Fisher Hall, pictured, was established in 1952 and now houses 180 students. The dorm strives to abide by the motto ”All are welcome in this place.”Fisher Hall was the gift of Sally Fisher in honor of her late husband Fred Fisher. It initially opened as a residence building for graduate students and seniors but has expanded since then to house approximately 180 students, two priests-in-residence and one rector. Fisher Hall received new additions in summer 2017.“We think that Fisher has a very vibrant community and the people in it are great but one thing we are certainly lacking in is our general appearance so the refresh was really nice,” Fisher co-president and junior Frank Dijak said. “To walk into Fisher as a parent, alumni or even as a student for the first time, you want them to feel that this is a nice place where you can live for four years.”Each April, Fisher’s signature event, the Fisher Regatta, draws participants and crowds from across campus to compete in a handmade boat racing competition. Since Mazzei — nicknamed “Mazz’ —became rector in 2014, the Fishermen have stressed the fundraising component of the event.“It’s one of the biggest campus-wide events,” Mazzei said. “I’m sure Keenan would argue with that with the Revue. Starting in 2015 we decided to adopt St. Adalbert’s Catholic School. We met with the pastor and the principal and they brought us over to the gym. It was awful. Nails were coming out of the floor, the backboards were broken and it was not well lit. We raised $5,000 dollars that year and redid the gym.”Since then, Fisher has raised more money each year in order to renovate the computer labs and the library. Over the course of five years, Fisher has given a total of $30,000 dollars to the school. In addition to financial support, Fisher partners with McGlinn Hall to tutor students at St. Adalbert’s and host a spirit day in the spring. “[Mazzei] is big on spending face time with the kids and bringing them on campus so we can be role models and influences on them,” Fisher co-president junior Owen Harte said.In addition to the Regatta, trademark Fisher events include its SYR, entitled “The Funk,” and the annual car smash on Fieldhouse Mall. “The guys buy into working hard on the car smash, the Regatta and tutoring,” Dijak said. “It’s not for a resume. Once they go once, they understand.”Since the beginning of the school year, a main focus for Fisher’s Hall Council has been sustainability.“We have a couple of guys who care a lot about that,” Dijak said. “Their plan is to try different strategies in Fisher. They want to get them enough off the ground to take to other halls and to promote environmental consciousness.”Harte explained that Fisher’s tight-knit sense of community is what makes it stand out among other residence halls at Notre Dame.“It’s the culture that’s been around for a few years because of Mazz,” Harte said. “He focuses on a culture of helping one’s brother. All guys that live here know that and a supportive community like that is cool. We might not have the nicest or newest dorm but guys wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.” Mazzei highlighted Sunday night mass in Fisher as a positive start to the week where residents can grow and dwell in faith together. “Being a rector is everything I’ve done in Catholic education rolled into one and I love the guys,” Mazzei said. “I share life with them everyday. I don’t have many bad days.”Both Harte and Dijak emphasized that Fisher’s smaller traditions, such as section football or Ellie’s Deli, are what make Fisher home. “My favorite small event that’s only within the dorm is Fisher Christmas,” Dijak said. “We don’t like to encroach on Carroll’s big thing. It’s only about an hour but Mazz gets food, there’s a competition to see who can get to the lights first and we decorate each floor.”As hall president, Harte relishes in deepening community with underclassmen and fostering a brotherhood of support. “People on the outside look at us and say ‘How can people live there,’” Harte said. “When you step inside it’s what we are in community. We’re not bricks on the outside. It’s what we are on the inside. I love Fisher and everything it has. We are the Cadillac and we are the Cadillac of spirit. Then you know why we live here and why we’re so loyal.”Tags: dorm features, Fisher, fisher hall, fisher regatta, St. Adalbert Catholic Schoollast_img read more

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Governor Wolf, Physician General Levine Remind Pennsylvanians about the Availability of Naloxone to Combat Overdoses

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Press Release,  Substance Use Disorder Lemoyne, PA – Governor Tom Wolf joined Pennsylvania Physician General Dr. Rachel Levine today at the Rite Aid Pharmacy in Lemoyne to remind Pennsylvania residents and pharmacists that a doctor’s prescription is not needed to obtain the life-saving opioid overdose antidote drug naloxone.“Fighting Pennsylvania’s opioid and heroin epidemic is a top priority for my administration, and increasing the access to and use of naloxone is a key aspect of this effort,” said Governor Wolf. “I look forward to continue working collaboratively with leaders in my administration like Dr. Levine, as well as the General Assembly and community leaders, to ensure that Pennsylvania leads the nation in the fight to combat the opioid abuse and heroin use epidemic. A collaborative effort on the federal, state, and local levels is crucial in combating this crisis.”“Naloxone is a vital medicine that saves lives in the battle against the opioid overdose public health crisis we are experiencing in Pennsylvania,” said Dr. Levine. “The Department of Health commends Rite Aid for its efforts to increase access to this life-saving drug in the commonwealth.”Last fall, as part of Governor Wolf’s effort to address the opioid abuse crisis in the state, Dr. Levine signed a standing order that serves as a prescription for all Pennsylvanians to access naloxone at their local pharmacies. This medication has saved the lives of hundreds of people in the commonwealth who overdosed on heroin or prescription opioids.Naloxone rapidly reverses heroin and other opioid overdoses. In 2014, nearly 2,500 Pennsylvanians died from a drug overdose. Heroin and opioid overdose are the leading cause of accidental death in Pennsylvania, killing more individuals each year than motor vehicle accidents.“As a community healthcare provider, Rite Aid is committed to doing our part in the fight against opioid abuse,” said Jocelyn Konrad, Rite Aid Executive Vice President of Pharmacy. “We are proud to support Governor Wolf and Dr. Levine in their efforts to expand access to naloxone and help reduce the number of deaths caused by opioid overdose across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.”Some of the administration’s initiatives in the fight against heroin include: signing a statewide standing order for naloxone, making it possible for all Pennsylvanians to access this life-saving drug; equipping the Pennsylvania State Police with naloxone so that those troopers who are first on the scene of an overdose can have another tool on-hand during these emergencies; partnering with Adapt Pharma to make Narcan available to public high schools across the state at no cost; developing the ABC-MAP prescription drug monitoring program to detect and prevent prescription fraud and abuse, which contribute to addiction; and appointing a director for the state’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Office, who will work to ensure that the PDMP meets its goal of assisting healthcare professionals in identifying patients that would benefit from treatment.In an effort to curtail drug addiction and curb the supply of excess drugs that can be used illicitly, the Department of Health is leading an effort to build upon the opioid prescribing guidelines already created, including specialty specific guidelines for emergency department providers, dentists, obstetricians and gynecologists, and pharmacists. These guidelines give healthcare providers direction for safe and effective pain relief practices, with greater emphasis on non-opioid therapies and greater caution to prevent addiction and diversion. In addition, the DOH recently joined dozens of healthcare organizations, medical experts, and consumer advocacy groups in signing petitions requesting changes to federal pain management requirements that are believed to foster dangerous prescribing practices.The Department of Drug and Alcohol Programs is developing the “warm hand-off” process “warm hand-off” process, whereby overdose survivors would be taken directly from the emergency department to a licensed drug treatment provider, as well as Pennsylvania’s Prescription Drug Take-Back Program. This program helps communities properly dispose of unused prescriptions at any of the 400+ police station locations across Pennsylvania. To date, approximately 40,000 pounds of prescription drugs have been taken back and destroyed.Governor Wolf’s decision to expand Medicaid eligibility in Pennsylvania under the Affordable Care Act has greatly increased access to treatment services for hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanians.Finally, Governor Wolf’s proposed 2016-17 budget provides more than $34 million to treat more than 11,250 new individuals with substance use disorder. The Department of Human Services will provide 25 new Opioid Use Disorder Centers of Excellence for individuals with substance use disorder, providing medication-assisted treatment and appropriate wraparound services, such as cognitive-based therapies. After this first phase of implementation, there will be a push for 25 more facilities that would have the capacity to treat 22,500 individuals total.Visit the “Opioid Abuse” page at www.health.pa.gov  to learn more about naloxone and how it can benefit your local community.# # #Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf May 17, 2016center_img Governor Wolf, Physician General Levine Remind Pennsylvanians about the Availability of Naloxone to Combat Overdoseslast_img read more

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