Ryan Kankowski gallops in for a great Sharks try

first_imgMonday May 19, 2008 Ryan Kankowski gallops in for a great Sharks try The Natal Sharks secured their place in this years Super 14 Semi Final on Saturday with a clinical 47-25 win over the Chiefs in Durban.The seven tries to three victory not only booked the Sharks’ place in the play-offs, after they finished third in the standings, but they also knocked their compatriots, the Stormers, out of the semifinals.To advance the Sharks needed to win with four tries or win by 18 points. They scored six tries and won by 22 points, despite the score being 21-18 after 46 minutes.One of the tries of the match came from thoroughbred Sharks number eight Ryan Kankowski. Kankowski is fast becoming a legend of Kingspark down in Durban, and will surely be a Springbok starter against Wales in the upcoming test series.The Chiefs were on the attack when big substitute loose forward Jean Deysel marked a chip ahead. The big man tapped and ran, selling a dummy as he pounded up the field. He gave to Ruan Pienaar who dazzled the Chiefs defence before he gave to Kankowski who scored over 80 metres down field.The Sharks are hitting their straps right on time, and if they continue to perform like they did on Saturday, we may well see them in the Final for the second consecutive year. Note: Please excuse the useless commentary on the replay. It’s not Jean Du Plessis as Garth Wright says – it is in fact Jean Deysel. ADVERTISEMENT Posted By: rugbydump Share Send Thanks Sorry there has been an error Related Articles 81 WEEKS AGO scottish prop saves fire victim 84 WEEKS AGO New Rugby X tournament insane 112 WEEKS AGO Vunipola stands by his comments supporting… From the WebThis Video Will Soon Be Banned. 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Watch: Reforging the Steelers | Episode 2 | RugbyPass Original Documentary In Episode 2 of Reforging the Steelers, we follow the team through rounds two to four as they try to get their season on track after an opening loss to competition powerhouses Tasman. ‘I’d pent-up frustration, a lot I probably didn’t realise’: Marcus Watson’s emotional Wasps return Set to turn 30 later this month, Marcus Watson had an early birthday present last weekend when he finally made it back into the Wasps XV. Gavin Coombes grabs four tries as Munster easy to victory over Zebre Gavin Coombes scored four tries at Zebre as Munster secured second place in the northern section of the Guinness PRO14 Rainbow Cup. Leinster finish with Rainbow flourish as fans attend RDS for first time in 16 months Retiring duo Scott Fardy and Michael Bent bowed out on a winning note as Leinster finished the Rainbow Cup with a victory over Dragons. Final round of the Gallagher Premiership hit by a second match cancellation The final round of the Premiership lost the Worcester-Gloucester match on Tuesday and now Bristol versus London Irish is off. Ryan Kankowski gallops in for a great Sharks try | RugbyDump – Rugby News & Videos RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features RugbyDump Home RugbyDump Academy Store About Contact Sitemap Categories Latest Great Tries Big Hits & Dirty Play See It To Believe It Funnies Training Videos Player Features Legal Privacy Policy Cookie Policy Sign In Username or Email Password Stay logged in Forgot password Thank you for registering Click here to login Register Register now for RugbyDump commenting & enewsletter. * Required fields. 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AI matchmaking platform helps companies & charities connect under new Social Value Act

first_imgAI matchmaking platform helps companies & charities connect under new Social Value Act An AI matchmaking platform has launched to connect companies and charities to help implement CSR programmes in line with the new requirements in the Social Value Act, which requires all companies that bid for public contracts to present a social value delivery plan and to report back on their social value impact every quarter. Advertisement “We are here to help save time and money for both Supporters (companies and grant-makers) and Recipients (social enterprises and charities), ensuring that the most impactful causes and projects are delivered with maximum efficiency. This benefits society as a whole. whatimpact is a fully transparent marketplace where everyone has access to the site profiles and interactions. We not only help organisations match with each other but help them report and communicate their impact to the public and other stakeholders.” AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis whatimpact uses AI to match companies and grant-makers with charities and social enterprises. The platform matches organisations based on shared values, UN sustainable development goals (SDGs) and geographic needs across the country, to help companies direct donations and skills to the organisations that need them most. Companies and grant-makers (Supporters) can post resource offers, such as money, skills, product and service donations, on their public profile, and charities and social enterprises (Recipients) can then apply for the resources they need. Both Supporter and Recipient profiles offer transparent data pulled from the Charity Commission, the OCSR, 360Giving and Companies House.  Melanie May | 7 June 2021 | News  148 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Recipient profilecenter_img Tiia Sammallahti, CEO/Founder of whatimpact said: Ernst & Young is one of the first organisations to sign up to the platform and will offer a series of business clinics to help charities and social enterprises with their business challenges, including managing finances, achieving scale and growth, and building resilience in times of uncertainty. Ernst & Young will also look to offer one-to-one coaching to help those involved continue to solve their business challenges. Gavin Jordan, UK Financial Services Chief Operating Officer of Ernst & Young commented: Supporter profile Tagged with: artificial intelligence “EY has set an ambitious global target to positively impact one billion lives by 2030 through our Global Corporate Responsibility Programme, EY Ripples. By working with whatimpact, we hope our people across the UK will be able to use their professional skills to help more charities and social enterprises overcome some of the business challenges they face, enabling them to have an even greater impact on the people and communities they work with.” About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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French unions respond to housing crisis

first_imgIn France, activists hold a banner saying “A roof is a right”According to the French housing alliance Right to Housing (DAL–Droit au Logement), cops are prepared to evict 30,000 families starting June 1. Some 130,000 families have been notified that they need to leave their homes immediately, while tens of thousands could have their electricity shut off any time after June 1. France has more than 300,000 homeless people out of a total population of around 67.4 million.June 1 is when the winter’s suspension of evictions and shut-offs expires.The General Confederation of Labor (CGT), along with Right to Housing, the feminist collective Fasti, formed to defend immigrant rights, and Paris d’Exil, an NGO focused on welcoming exiles, formed a coalition in March and called major demonstrations in 31 French cities under the slogan: “A roof is a right.” These demonstrations were coordinated with actions in other European countries and endorsed by many progressive unions, associations and political parties, including the Greens and the Communist Party of French Workers.The CGT is the second-largest and oldest union in France, with a militant history of defending workers’ retirement rights and unemployment insurance, on the job, in the streets and in the political arena.The program of this coalition is simple: decrease rents, increase investment in public housing and end evictions and removals. They point out that state assistance for lower-income individuals needs to increase and that officials who carry out an eviction are responsible for finding new housing for those evicted. In some cities they have set up large numbers of tents for the homeless.The way the French government has responded to the COVID-19 pandemic sharply increased the profits of landlords and real estate investors.The DAL and the CGT, through posts on their web pages and Facebook, managed to organize a number of small but significant demonstrations May 29 and 30 in Paris, as well as in Lille, Bordeaux, Lyon, Toulouse, Marseilles and other cities.While French politics places a great deal of emphasis on protests, demonstrations and marches, the elections — especially for president — are also important. The next French presidential election is still 11 months away, tentatively scheduled for April 23, 2022, and the housing crisis is going to be a major issue.Even France’s far-right party, the National Rally (RN, Rassemblement National), has declared the housing crisis a major problem for France. Its proposed solution takes up nearly nine pages and contains a lot of tweaks — such as making the purchase of real estate cheaper and providing low-cost loans to young people, encouraging them to buy public housing — which would give the public housing authorities the capital to produce more public housing. The RN proposals exclude non-French residents.The RN and some voices in the corporate English-language media elsewhere, like the New York Times and BBC, are predicting that the RN could win in next year’s election, that it could break through the barrier erected by France’s two rounds of voting. But to get to the second round, this far-right party would have to do better than the French left.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Fort Worth museum offers Looney Toons experience

first_imgLinkedin Facebook Linkedin Fort Worth braces for more severe weather Twitter printThe Fort Worth Museum of Science and History is commemorating the creator of Looney Tunes with a special exhibit.The exhibit entitled “What’s Up, Doc? The Animation Art of Chuck Jones” displays some of the animator’s most popular films and characters.Widely known for creating “Looney Tunes”, Chuck Jones made a name for himself in the world of animation when he worked for the Warner Bros. cartoon studio during the 1940s and 1950s.Jones experienced a long career of filmmaking even after his time at Warner Bros, according to the exhibit. He continued to animate and make short films, many of which are on display in the exhibit.The exhibit highlights Jones’ early development as an artist and animator. His ability to create vibrant and dynamic characters with comedic flair also shines through the progression of the exhibit. Iconic characters such as Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Wile E. Coyote leave some patrons feeling nostalgic.To accompany Jones’ works, the museum also hosts a lecture series each Saturday that will continue until the closing of the exhibit April 26.One of the guest lecturers was Joan McGettigan, a film-television-digital media professor at TCU. Her lecture was entitled “Historical Perspectives: Cartoons in American Life.”“I pointed out that many people tend to consider cartoons for kids only,” McGettigan said.“[But] some of the cartoons Hollywood has produced over the years have been very grown up,” she said.Jake Foote is The 109’s art and museums reporter.  Email him at [email protected] + posts Stories from the polls: Election Day in The109! Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ Facebook Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ ReddIt Previous articleFort Worth Bike Sharing program sees growth two years inNext articleSeminar promotes water-conscious gardening The 109 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ ReddIt The 109https://www.tcu360.com/author/the-109/ The 109 TCU athletes are “SPARK-ing” an interest in Fort Worth area students Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature last_img read more

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“Mere Expression Of Derogatory Words Do Not Attract Section 124A or 153A”:J&K HC Grants Bail To Councillor Accused Of Making ‘Derogatory Remarks’ During Indo-China Face-Off [Read Order]

first_imgNews Updates”Mere Expression Of Derogatory Words Do Not Attract Section 124A or 153A”:J&K HC Grants Bail To Councillor Accused Of Making ‘Derogatory Remarks’ During Indo-China Face-Off [Read Order] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK25 Sep 2020 12:15 AMShare This – xThe Jammu & Kashmir High Court on Thursday (24th September) granted bail to an elected Councillor of LAHDC (Ladakh Autonomous Hill Development Council, Leh) who has been accused of making derogatory remarks against the leadership of the Country and against the Armed Forces of the Country.The Bench of Justice Sanjay Dhar was hearing the plea of Zakir Hussain (a democratically elected…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Jammu & Kashmir High Court on Thursday (24th September) granted bail to an elected Councillor of LAHDC (Ladakh Autonomous Hill Development Council, Leh) who has been accused of making derogatory remarks against the leadership of the Country and against the Armed Forces of the Country.The Bench of Justice Sanjay Dhar was hearing the plea of Zakir Hussain (a democratically elected Councilor of LAHDC) wherein it has been submitted that the petitioner has been falsely implicated in case FIR No.34 of 2020.Relying on Supreme Court Judgment in Balwant Singh and Anr. vs State of Punjab, the High Court observed that  mere expression of derogatory or objectionable words may not be a sufficient ground for invoking the provisions contained in Section 124A or 153A of IPC. The said provisions would apply only when the written or spoken words have the tendency or intention of creating disorder or disturbance of public peace by resort to violence. “It will be premature for this Court to comment on the question whether the alleged conversation made by the petitioner and uploaded on the social media has the tendency of creating disorder or disturbance of public peace by resort to violence. The same has to be considered by the trial court while framing charge against the petitioner, against whom, the challan is stated to have been filed during the pendency of this bail petition.”The FIR has been registered for offences under Section 124A (Sedition), 153A (Promoting enmity between different groups on grounds of religion, race, place of birth, residence, language, etc., and doing acts prejudicial to maintenance of harmony), 153B ( Imputations, assertions prejudicial to national-integration), 505(2) (Statements creating or promoting enmity, hatred or ill will between classes) and 188 (Disobedience to order duly promulgated by public servant) of IPC registered with Police Station, Kargil.The petitioner had approached the Court of learned Principal Sessions Judge, Kargil, by way of a bail application but the same was dismissed vide order dated 28.07.2020.It has been alleged by the Prosecution that the petitioner has made highly objectionable and derogatory comments against the Country and its armed forces and uploaded the said remarks on social media and, therefore, the offences mentioned in the FIR are made out against him.Background of the CaseAs per the case of the prosecution, on 18.06.2020, Police received information from reliable sources that an audio clip containing objectionable conversation pertaining to the armed forces of the Country having reference to clashes between the Indian Army and armed forces of China that took place in the Galwan Valley, has gone viral on social media.On the basis of this information, the subject FIR was registered by the police and investigation of the case was set into motion.During the investigation of the case, an audio clip of 6.3 minutes duration was seized and it was found to contain a conversation between the petitioner/accused, Zakir Hussain, and co-accused Nissar Ahmad Khan.The conversation contains extremely objectionable expressions and sentences allegedly used by the petitioner against the Country, its leadership as well as against the Indian Armed Forces. Accordingly, the petitioner was arrested on 19.06.2020.The counsel for the petitioner vehemently contended that even if it is assumed that the petitioner had made the conversation and uploaded the same on the social media; still then, the offence under Section 124A and 153A of IPC is not made out against the petitioner.According to him, in order to make out a case under Section 124A of IPC, it is necessary that the offensive remarks or speech should lead to some sort of violence or agitation from the public, which is not the case here.The Counsel for the Petitioner relied on the case of Balwant Singh and Anr. vs State of Punjab (1995) 3 SCC 214 to bring home the aforesaid point.In the case of Balwant Singh (supra) the Apex Court had held that mere expression of derogatory or objectionable words may not be a sufficient ground for invoking the provisions contained in Section 124A or 153A of IPC.The said provisions would apply only when the written or spoken words have the tendency or intention of creating disorder or disturbance of public peace by resort to violence.Court’ AnalysisThe Court was of the opinion that it would be premature for the Court to comment on the question as to whether the alleged conversation made by the petitioner and uploaded on social media has the tendency of creating disorder or disturbance of public peace by resort to violence.The Court observed that the same has to be considered by the trial court while framing charge against the petitioner, against whom, the challan is stated to have been filed during the pendency of this bail petition.Further, the Court noted that the challan in the case has been filed, which means that the investigation of the case is complete.The petitioner, the Court observed, is not alleged to have committed an offence which carries capital punishment, as such, the rigour of Section 437(1)(i) of the Code of Criminal Procedure is not attracted to the instant case.Besides this, the Court noted,”The petitioner is an elected representative of LAHDC having deep roots in the community, as such, the chances of his fleeing from justice are very remote… The Case Diary shows that immediately after the commission of the alleged offence by the petitioner, he has published a public apology and expressed his regrets. This conduct of the petitioner subsequent to the commission of the alleged offence, lends assurance against the repetition of a similar offence by the petitioner.” (emphasis supplied)For the foregoing reasons, the petition was accepted by the Court and the petitioner was admitted to bail subject to the condition that he shall furnish personal bond with one surety in the sum of Rs.50,000/ to the satisfaction of the trial court.Case Details:Case Title: Zakir Hussain v. UT of Ladakh through Director General of Police and othersCase No.: Bail App No.67/2020Quorum: Justice Sanjay DharAppearance: Advocate M. A. Rathore (for the petitioner); ASGI T. M. Shamsi, (for the respondents)Click Here To Download Order[Read Order]Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Insolvency Law In Review – October 2020

first_imgColumnsInsolvency Law In Review – October 2020 Rahul Sibal, Siddharth Sunil, Akshata Singh &Pranav Narsaria14 Nov 2020 5:15 AMShare This – xBY Rahul Sibal, Siddharth Sunil, Akshata Singh, Pranav Narsaria & Karan Sangani The enactment of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code 2016 (the Code) has had significant ramifications on the corporate insolvency landscape. Over time, the Code has witnessed a manifold increase in litigation, and consequently in the number of decisions. This has made it difficult for…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginBY Rahul Sibal, Siddharth Sunil, Akshata Singh, Pranav Narsaria & Karan Sangani The enactment of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code 2016 (the Code) has had significant ramifications on the corporate insolvency landscape. Over time, the Code has witnessed a manifold increase in litigation, and consequently in the number of decisions. This has made it difficult for insolvency practitioners to stay updated with developments in the field. The purpose of this column is to fill this gap by providing brief summaries of latest decisions, from the various fora dealing with Insolvency Law. These case summaries are not an exhaustive review of the cases under the Code; only significant rulings on the Code in the month of October have been summarized. However, this does not negate the possibility of some important decisions being missed on account of human error. Further, since the purpose of this endeavor is to keep practitioners abreast of relevant developments, the decisions summarized have not been comprehensively analyzed.Supreme Court In Kridhan Infrastructure Pvt Ltd. v. Venkatesan Sankaranarayanan and Ors, the Supreme Court (SC), in the context of the bona fides demonstrated prima facie by the resolution applicant towards honouring the approved resolution plan, observed that liquidation of the Corporate Debtor should be a matter of last resort, as the Code has a wider public interest in resolving corporate insolvencies, its object is not limited to mere recovery of outstanding debt. Consequently, the SC stayed the liquidation order passed by the National Company Law Appellate Tribunal (NCLAT).High Courts In Gouri Shankar Chatterjee v. State Bank of India (C.O/1257/2020), the Calcutta High Court held that (i) the National Company Law Tribunal (NCLT) did not have the jurisdiction to entertain an application u/s 7 of the Code, which was filed more than three (3) years after the right to file an insolvency application (as mentioned in Article 137 under the Limitation Act 1965 (Limitation Act)) accrued; and (ii) in the present case, the limitation period under Article 137 was to be calculated from the date of declaration of the Corporate Debtor’s bank account as a Non Performing Asset (NPA). In arriving at these conclusions, the High Court followed the SC’s decisions in Babulal Vardharji Gurjar, and Gaurav Hargovindhbhai Dave , respectively. Further, the High Court relied on Embassy Property Development Pvt. Ltd., to hold that it was entitled to interfere under Article 227 of the Constitution, since the NCLT had exceeded its jurisdiction, and that the existence of the remedy of statutory appeal would not bar the High Court’s jurisdiction. Finally, the High Court found that the present petition did not suffer from any delay, in light of the period of limitation for all proceedings having been extended vide the SC’s order dated 23.03.2020 in Suo Motu Writ Petition (Civil) No. 3/2020, passed in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. The High Court quashed the NCLT order initiating the corporate insolvency resolution process (CIRP) against the Corporate Debtor, and its subsequent order directing the commencement of liquidation proceedings.National Company Law Appellate TribunalIn Praveen Kumar Sharma v. Arcee Trading Corporation and Anr., the NCLAT observed that the proceedings u/s 9 of the Code are summary in nature, and that the NCLT cannot investigate disputed facts raised u/s 8 of the Code, which is a procedure appropriate for trial courts. Consequently, it set aside the order passed by the NCLT, Delhi, whereby the Respondent’s application u/s 9 of the Code was admitted and the CIRP was initiated. In B. Prashanth Hegde v. State Bank of India and Anr., the NCLAT followed the established position of law that Article 137 of the Limitation Act would be applicable to applications filed under Ss. 7 and 9 of the Code. Additionally, it noted that, for the purposes of Article 137, the date of NPA was to be taken as the date of default, in accordance with the Supreme Court’s decision in Gaurav Hargovindbhai Dave. In Volkswagen Finance Private Limited v. Shree Balaji Printopack Pvt Ltd , the NCLAT held that the mere fact that a charge was registered through a hypothecation registration with the Regional Transport Office in accordance with S.51 of the Motor Vehicles Act, 1988 would not accord the creditor, the status of a ‘secured creditor’ with respect to liquidation proceedings under the Code, unless such charge has been registered u/s 77 of the Companies Act, 2013 (Companies Act). In Ramesh Kymal v. M/s Siemens Gamesa Renewable Power Private Limited, it was held that the bar against the initiation of CIRP u/s 10A of the Code would extend to applications filed before the date on which the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code (Amendment) Ordinance, 2020 came into effect (5th June 2020) (the Ordinance). Here, the Operational Creditor had filed an application for initiation of CIRP for a default that had occurred after 25th March 2020. The NCLT rejected the petition on the ground that the newly introduced S.10A barred the filing of insolvency applications for defaults committed on or after 25th March 2020. On appeal, the creditor argued that the purview of S.10A of the Code would not extend to insolvency applications concerning defaults after 25th March but before 5th June 2020, the date when the Ordinance came into force. The NCLAT dismissed the appeal on the premise that such an interpretation would be inconsistent with the objective behind the introduction of S.10A. However, it was clarified that the bar u/s 10A would not operate in the scenarios where the default has occurred before 25th March (although the application might have been filed before 6th June 2020). In Rajendra Bhai Panchal v. M/s Jay Manak Steels, it was held that a mere mistake in the demand notice u/s 8 of the Code would not render such notice defective, and if the Corporate Debtor were to question the validity of the demand, the burden would lie on the Corporate Debtor to show that it was adversely affected by the mistake. It was further held that the mere fact of quantum of debt being mis-stated would not ipso facto render the decision defective, as long as the minimum statutory figure is owed, since it is not the burden of the ‘Adjudicating Authority’ to determine the quantum of debt. NCLAT clarified that, in such scenarios the Court would only invalidate the notice if injustice would be caused to the debtor, if the failure to interfere would cause injustice to the debtor. Additionally, on the question of whether parties are permitted to bring additional evidence on record, it was held, following the Supreme Court’s decision in Haryana State Industrial Development Corporation v. Cork Manufacturing Company AIR 2008 SC 56, that the permissibility of the same would depend on whether such documents are necessary for the Tribunal to decide the controversy between the parties. In M/s Shruti Impex v. M/s N.R Commercials Pvt. Ltd, the NCLAT held that, where any person claiming to be an Operational Creditor is unable to adduce proof in the form of tax invoices, tax remittances, transportation documents, waybill and so on, to establish that the goods were, in fact, supplied to the Corporate Debtor, it would follow that such person cannot claim relief u/s 9, in view of the failure to establish the relationship of Operational Creditor-Corporate Debtor. In Niyati Chemicals v. Minepro Minerals Pvt Ltd., the NCLAT held that commercial advances given in the course of business dealings for supply of goods would not come within ‘Financial Debt’ u/s 7 of the Code. In Gujarat Urja Vikas Nigam Ltd. v. Yes Bank Limited & Ors, the NCLAT held that, where the Corporate Debtor has contracted to produce and supply power under a Power Purchase Agreement, the other contracting party/power consumer would not be entitled to terminate the agreement, where a secured creditor seeks to realise its security interest u/s 52 of the Code in the power generation assets, and it is evident that the assets and the agreement together form one ‘integrated economic asset’. It was further held that where the termination of the agreement would have a bearing on the valuation of the asset, such termination would be required to be set aside, to ensure value maximization in the liquidation process. In Umesh Saraf v. Tech India Engineers Pvt. Ltd., it was held that instead of taking a technical objection to the Corporate Debtor’s email reply to the demand notice issued u/s 8, NCLT, New Delhi should have analysed the documents placed before it by the Corporate Debtor to establish the existence of a prior dispute. Consequently, the NCLAT set aside the decision of the NCLT, New Delhi that admitted an application for the initiation of CIRP u/s 9 of the Code on the sole ground that the Corporate Debtor had failed to reply to the demand notice even though the existence of a prior dispute was agitated before the NCLT, New Delhi; and (ii) the Corporate Debtor’s email reply to the Operational Creditor neither mentioned being in the form of reply to the S.8 demand notice nor complied with the statutory period of ten (10) days as contemplated u/s 8(2) of the Code. The NCLAT reiterated that the Code is a beneficial legislation intended to put the Corporate Debtor on its feet and not a mere money recovery legislation. In Switching AVO Electro Power v. Ambient Computronics (P) Ltd, it was held that if an application u/s 9 was complete, unless the Corporate Debtor establishes the existence of a pre-existing dispute, the NCLT was required to admit such application, irrespective of internal disputes within the Corporate Debtor regarding provision of goods or services by the Operational Creditor. The NCLAT further held that, in case of the supply of goods, once the Corporate Debtor gives an acknowledgment of delivery, the fact that the delivery address for goods was not the registered office or a branch office of the Corporate Debtor, did not amount to non-proof of delivery of goods. This case involved a reply by the Corporate Debtor to a S.8 demand notice, which claimed that, due to fraudulent branch operations by one of its directors, and a lapse in filing books of account by such branch office, the head office of the Corporate Debtor was ignorant of supply of goods by the applicant. The impugned NCLT order took note of the internal disputes within the Corporate Debtor, and rejected the S.9 application on the ground of non-proof of delivery of goods, as the invoice relied on by the applicant, showed a delivery address which was neither a registered office nor a branch address of the Corporate Debtor. The NCLAT observed that the invoice relied upon had a stamp and signature of receipt by the branch office of the Corporate Debtor, which was sufficient proof of supply of goods to the Corporate Debtor. The NCLAT set aside the impugned order, and referred the case back to the NCLT for admission. In Mr. Bhaskar v. M/S Sai Precious Traexim & Ors., the NCLAT set aside an admission order u/s.7 on the ground that the service of advance copy of an application under the IBC cannot be construed as ‘Service of Notice’ issued by the tribunal under Rule 38 of the National Company Law Tribunal Rules 2016 (NCLT Rules). In the context of powers of the NCLT to impose penalty for fraudulent or malicious commencement of proceedings, the NCLAT held that no penalty under sub-section (1) or sub-section (2) of S. 65 of the Code can be levied without the NCLT recording an opinion with reasons for a prima facie case to initiate resolution or liquidation ‘fraudulently’ or ‘with malicious intent’. In Re: Sudip Bhattacharya, Resolution Profesional of Reliance Naval and Engineering against a NCLT order extending the CIRP , the NCLAT held that the lockdown period would be excluded while computing the total period for CIRP. The impugned NCLT order had extended the CIRP by ninety (90) days without excluding the lockdown period. The NCLAT allowed the challenge and ruled that the hardship caused due to the lockdown required mitigation by allowing exclusion of number of days while computing the total period for CIRP. In Singh Raj Singh v. SRS Meditech Limited, the NCLAT held that there was no requirement for the resolution plan to match the maximized asset value of the Corporate Debtor. The case involved a challenge to the approval of a resolution plan by a suspended director of the Corporate Debtor. The Appellant, inter alia, argued that valuation of the Corporate Debtor under Regulation 35 of IBBI (Insolvency Resolution Process for Corporate Persons) Regulations (CIRP Regulations), only considered plant and machinery, leaving out other fixed and current assets of the Corporate Debtor. The NCLAT followed the Supreme Court decision in Maharashtra Seamless Ltd. v. Padmanabhan Venkatesh & Ors., which held that the valuation of the assets of the Corporate Debtor was meant to assist the Committee of Creditors (CoC) to take decisions on a resolution plan, and there was no requirement for the resolution plan to match the maximized asset value of the Corporate Debtor. The NCLAT further held, that an Ex-Director did not have any right or power to challenge the commercial wisdom of the CoC on approval of a resolution plan, which is undergoing implementation. In Anup Sushil Dubey v. National Agriculture Co-Operative Marketing Federation of India Ltd., the NCLAT held that a lease rental of a cold storage unit for commercial purposes would qualify as an ‘Operational Debt’ u/s 5(21) of the Code. In coming to its conclusion, NCLAT relied on the definition of ‘service’ under the Consumer Protection Act, 2019; and the activities that are treated as supply of goods or services under the Central Goods and Services Tax Act, 2017. The NCLAT also relied on the Supreme Court’s decision in Mobilox Innovations Private Limited V/s. Kirusa Software Private Limited. In Madhusudan Tantia v. Amit Choraria & Ors., the NCLAT held that the MCA notification dated 24.03.2020 raising the minimum amount of default for claiming relief under Ss. 7 and 9 of the Code to INR One (1) Crore (1,00,00,000) is prospective in nature, and that it would not affect applications filed before the various authorities prior to its issuance.National Company Law Tribunals In Argentium International Private Limited v. UTM Engineering Private Limited,. the NCLT, Delhi held that it could not interfere when the CoC had, in its commercial wisdom, decided not to seek an extension of the CIRP, and had opted for liquidation of the Corporate Debtor and exploration of the possibility of it being sold as a going concern. As such, the Tribunal allowed the application of the Resolution Professional (RP) seeking liquidation of the Corporate Debtor. In M/s Vipul Investment v. V Mahesh, the NCLT Chennai, held that, where loans have been disbursed by the Financial Creditor to the account of the Managing Director of the company, and where sufficient evidence, such as loan agreements, board meetings, etc., has not been adduced, insolvency proceedings cannot be initiated against the Corporate Debtor. To arrive at this conclusion, the Tribunal reasoned that since the Corporate Debtor is a separate entity as opposed to its director, and since requisite due diligence had not been exercised by the creditor to determine whether the loans disbursed were intended or had been provided to the company, the creditor could not initiate proceedings against the Corporate Debtor. In Liquidator of Precision Fasteners Limited v. Siddhi Edibles Private Limited, the NCLT, Mumbai held that the recovery of rent from the tenant and the eviction of tenant from the property of the Corporate Debtor are in the exclusive domain of the civil courts and cannot be dealt with by the Tribunal through an invocation of S. 60(5) of the Code. The Tribunal, while, inter alia, dealing with the question of whether it could pass directions concerning the recovery of rent from the tenant, the eviction of the tenant from and the sale of the property of the Corporate Debtor u/s 60(5)(c) of the Code, expounded on the nature of the jurisdiction of the Tribunal under the Code. The Tribunal emphasised that the jurisdiction for the recovery of rent and the eviction of the tenant lies with the civil court/rent control court only. However, the Tribunal distinguished that as far as sale of the property by the liquidator was concerned, the liquidator could do so after taking possession of the property of the Corporate Debtor by due process of law. In EPC Construction India Ltd. v. NCL India Ltd., NCLT, Mumbai declined to interfere with the invocation of the bank guarantees and to decide the merits of the matter, by holding that the disputed allegation pertaining to the fraudulent invocation of the bank guarantees is outside the purview of the Code. Here, the Corporate Debtor sought an injunction against the invocation of bank guarantees on the ground that they were invoked in a fraudulent manner and in complete violation of the Code. The Tribunal stated that the matter ought to be dealt with by a competent civil court after appreciation of the evidence adduced and perusal of the documentary material placed on record before it in a civil trial. In Credit Suisse Funds Ag v. Himadri Foods Ltd., the NCLT, Mumbai held thatit is empowered to adjudje an application seeking the revival of a company petition disposed of as withdrawn, after recording the settlement terms arrived at between the parties, in exercise of the powers conferred on the Tribunal under Rule 11 of the NCLT Rules. Here, the question before the NCLT, Mumbai was whether the company petition, which had been disposed of, pursuant to the recording of the settlement terms, could be revived by the Financial Creditor owing to the failure of the Corporate Debtor to comply with the settlement terms. It was the contention of the Corporate Debtor that the Code does not provide for the revival or the restoration of a company petition, which had already been disposed of and that the Code envisages only three (3) situations—admission, dismissal or withdrawal of a company petition before admission. The Corporate Debtor argued that once a petition is withdrawn, the creditor at best can make a fresh application under the Code, which will be subject to fresh adjudication, and the debtor shall be entitled to oppose such an application. The Tribunal rejected the contentions of the Corporate Debtor and directed the revival and restoration of the original company petition under Rule 11 of the NCLT Rules. In Bank of Baroda v. Topworth Tollways (Ujjain) P Ltd., the NCLT, Mumbai reiterated the holding of the SC in Innoventive Industries Ltd. v. ICICI Bank Ltd., which stated that ‘default’ is defined in S. 3(12) of the Code in very wide terms as meaning non-payment of a debt once it becomes due and payable, which includes non-payment of even part thereof or an instalment amount. In this case, the Corporate Debtor, inter alia, contended before the Tribunal that the amount claimed to be in default by the Financial Creditor was inaccurate, as the Financial Creditor instead of claiming only the defaulted interest and the defaulted principal pertaining to the specified quarter, claimed the entire amount. The Tribunal, while rejecting the claim of the Corporate Debtor, stated that the Financial Creditor was entitled to claim the entire amount under the acceleration clause of the loan agreement between the parties when a single payment of interest or principal was defaulted by the Corporate Debtor and the Corporate Debtor defaulted in making the payment of the amount claimed by the Financial Creditor. In Invent Asset Securitization and Asset Reconstruction Private Limited v. Vijendra Kumar Jain, Resolution Professional of Shree Vindhya Paper Mills Ltd., NCLT, Mumbai emphasised that the CoC is sufficiently empowered to decide the amount of payment to each class/sub-class of creditors as per its commercial wisdom. Here, the aggrieved Financial Creditor having a second charge on the immovable property of the Corporate Debtor, prayed to the Tribunal for the revision of the resolution plan on the ground that it provided for the payment of only 0.5% of the principal outstanding to the Financial Creditor. The Financial Creditor contended that the resolution plan was manifestly arbitrary and unfair, as even the Operational Creditors were placed in a better position than the second charge holders on a percentage basis. The Tribunal, while noting that the CoC has the authority to make payment based on the realisable value of the security to each creditor/class of creditors, decided that the claim of the Financial Creditor was not justiciable. The Tribunal further observed that the claim that the Operational Creditors were receiving higher amounts than the second charge holders could not be a cause for complaint, when the liquidation value attributable to the both of them was zero. In Deputy Commissioner of Customs v. Jyoti Structure Ltd., the NCLT, Mumbai held that it is the responsibility of the creditor concerned to file a claim within the stipulated time after the issuance of a public notice inviting claims by RP. Here, the Deputy Commissioner of Customs claimed that by virtue of Ss. 18(1)(a) and 18(1)(b) of the Code, the RP is duty bound to identify the liabilities of the Corporate Debtor and send them notices to enable them to file a claim. The Tribunal, which rejecting the claim, cited Regulation 6 of the CIRP Regulations, which provides that the Interim Resolution Professional (IRP) shall make a public announcement within three (3) days from date of his appointment, inviting claims from the public, and the claimant should file claim within the stipulated time. In Axis Bank v. Seven Hills Healthcare Pvt. Ltd., NCLT, Amaravati observed that it is in the interest of all stakeholders that the CIRP is allowed to be completed, and that liquidation proceedings should only be initiated as a matter of last resort. Following the law laid down by the Supreme Court in Committee of Creditors of Essar Steel India Limited v. Satish Kumar Gupta and Ors, wherein it was held that the CIRP could be extended beyond 330 days if, inter alia, the litigants were not at fault for the delay, the Tribunal considered as valid the inability of the prospective resolution applicants to visit the premises of the Corporate Debtor, which had been converted into a dedicated COVID Hospital by the Municipal Corporation of Greater Mumbai. Consequently, the Tribunal allowed the application of the RP, and granted a ninety (90) day extension to complete the CIRP. In Deepak Uniyal v. Leel Electricals Ltd., NCLT, Allahabad followed Swiss Ribbons (P) Ltd. v. Union of India, to hold that a withdrawal application filed by the original applicant pursuant to a settlement with the Corporate Debtor cannot be allowed post the constitution of the CoC. The order was passed pursuant to various applications filed for vacation of the status quo order passed by the NCLT in a withdrawal application filed by the original applicant which was a Financial Creditor. NCLT allowed the vacation of stay and ordered continuation of CIRP while advising the Corporate Debtor to follow the process u/s 12A of the Code. In Union Bank of India v. Shri Lakshmi Cotsyn Limited, NCLT, Allahabad held that the Code was a beneficial legislation to protect the Corporate Debtor from its management and corporate death, hence, the time limit provided under Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India (Liquidation) Regulations 2018 to formulate and implement a scheme of arrangement post liquidation could be extended in order to avoid corporate death. The NCLT also relied on the NCLAT order in S.C Sekaran v Amit Gupta, which had held that the NCLT could extend the time taken for liquidating the Corporate Debtor, if there was a chance of approval of a scheme of arrangement under Ss.230-232 of the Companies Act. In MKM Technologies v. M/S Leel Electricals Ltd, NCLT Allahabad held that S.238 of the Code will override the Customs Act 1962 (Customs Act). The NCLT issued the order pursuant to an application by the RP, to direct the Commissioner of Customs to hand over the Corporate Debtor’s assets that were lying with the Commissioner as on the date of initiation of CIRP. The Department of Customs (the Department) relied on the bond furnished by the Corporate Debtor which empowered the proper officer under Customs Act to sell Corporate Debtor’s goods under the Disposal Manual read with S.72 of the Customs Act to recover penalties, interest or government dues, in case the Corporate Debtor failed to comply with conditions of the bond. The Department claimed that the Corporate Debtor had not fulfilled its obligations to file a bill of entry for several consignments, for more than a year, and disposal proceedings of goods regarding such consignments had begun before the insolvency commencement date. The NCLT ruled that the goods of the Corporate Debtor had not been sold during the CIRP, and would therefore come within the scope of S.14 of the Code by virtue of the non-obstante provision u/s S.238 of the Code, and allowed the application. In Jasubhai International FZCO v. Ashok Kumar Gullah, NCLT Allahabad held that an interest free earnest money deposit (EMD) would not qualify as financial debt u/s 5(8) of the Code. NCLAT rejected the application of a creditor u/s 60(5) challenging the rejection of its financial claim by the RP. The basis of the claim was a letter of intent (LOI) issued by the Corporate Debtor, pursuant to which the applicant had made an EMD for INR Three (3) Crores (3,00,00,000). The parties entered into an agreement and LOI, for solar PV power projects. requiring the Corporate Debtor to (i) issue a work order to the applicant; and (ii) obtain approval for the applicant as a vendor for development of the project. However, the Corporate Debtor subsequently withdrew from the project, and did not refund the EMD to the applicant. Accordingly, when claims were invited from the Corporate Debtor’s creditors, the applicant filed its claim as a Financial Creditor claiming 12% interest on the EMD. The NCLT rejected the application noting that the lack of an interest clause or assured returns on the EMD, ruled out lack of time value of money as consideration for advancing EMD, making the applicant’s claim u/s 5(8) unsustainable. In Shree Ambica Rice Mill v. M/s. Kaneri Agro Industries Ltd., the NCLT Ahmedabad dismissed an application u/sn 7 of the Code as it found that it was a collusive application by which the Corporate Debtor was seeking the benefits of the moratorium u/s 14 of the Code in order to stop a Bank from continuing with SARFAESI proceedings which had been initiated against the Corporate Debtor. In this case, the Financial Creditor repeatedly provided loans on interest to the Corporate Debtor, all of which were squared up on the same date or in a very short period of time thereafter. Looking at the nature of these transactions, the NCLT observed that these transactions were entered into between the parties (Financial Creditor and Corporate Debtor) in order to create a turn over/ volume of transactions in the account of the Corporate Debtor or as margin money in order to enable the Corporate Debtor to avail a cash credit facility from the Bank of Baroda. Furthermore, the NCLT also observed that in this case, the Corporate Debtor did not even oppose the Financial Creditor’s application u/s 7 of the Code, and after dismissing the application, the NCLT also issued a show cause notice to the Financial Creditor as to why penalty should not be imposed on both the parties u/s65 of the Code. In Urvashi Kamath and Anr v. M/s Moonriver Resorts Pvt. Ltd., the NCLT, Kochi was dealing with an application filed u/s 7 of the Code. In this case, the Financial Creditor had made an investment to purchase a share in a Resort to be developed by the Corporate Debtor, and under the terms of their agreement, the Corporate Debtor would compensate the Financial Creditor for a delay in construction of the Resort, and also pay him 1/6th of the rental pool income generated in an accounting year. Furthermore, if the rental pool income for an accounting year was less than 9% of the consideration paid by the Financial Creditor, then the Corporate Debtor would pay 9% of the total consideration to the Financial Creditor. Additionally, at the end of five (5) years, the Corporate Debtor would buy back the 1/6th share of the Financial Creditor at 140% of the original sale price. The NCLT held that this Agreement, constituted a financial debt u/s 5(8) of the Code, as it was a debt along with interest disbursed against the consideration for a time value of money and it had a commercial effect of a borrowing u/s 5(8)(f) of the Code. In this case the NCLT also held that a whatsapp communication could be treated as an acknowledgement of a liability for the purpose of S.18 of the Limitation Act. In M/s The Kerala Chamber of Commerce and Industry v. Adv Tom Thomas and Ors., the NCLT, Kochi held that a single member bench is also empowered to hear and dispose of matters under the Companies Act. In coming to its conclusion, the NCLT differentiated the Supreme Court’s judgements in Union of India v. R. Gandhi and in Madras Bar Association v. UOI and also the NCLAT’s judgements in Indison Agro Foods v. Registrar, and held that the ratio of these decisions did not mandate that there need to be a minimum of two members on every bench of the NCLT for constituting a valid quorum.(Rahul is a law clerk at the Supreme Court of India, Siddharth is an advocate based in New Delhi, Akshata is a lawyer based out of New Delhi, Pranav is an advocate based in Mumbai, and Karan is a lawyer based out of Mumbai) Next Storylast_img read more

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Another man jailed for murder of Strabane native in Dublin

first_img Previous articleDerry security alert ends as suspicious object is declared a hoaxNext articleEvening News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday November 2nd News Highland Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic AudioHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Twitter Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Google+ Another man has been jailed for life for his role in the murder of Strabane native Michael Barr, who was shot dead as part of the Hutch/Kinahan gangland feud.David Hunter, of White City in London, was one of two masked gunmen who killed the dissident republican at the Sunset House pub in Dublin.Michael Barr was shot seven times when two men wearing Freddie Kruger style masks walked into the pub where he was working on April 25th 2016.Gardaí linked David Hunter to the shooting through phone evidence and forensics found in the getaway car.His DNA was found on one of the latex masks.Through her victim impact statement, Mr Barr’s sister, Noeleen, said her brother was gunned down on the orders of others, and she said she couldn’t understand how a life could be measured by drugs and money.Hunter, who’s 42, was handed the mandatory life sentence for murder.He’s the third person to be convicted for Michael Barr’s killing, but outside court after he was sentenced today, Det Superintendent Colm Murphy said he won’t be the last………….Audio Playerhttps://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/14murphy-sunset-clip-fg.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Twitter By News Highland – November 2, 2020 center_img Another man jailed for murder of Strabane native in Dublin Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Facebook Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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Pennsylvania police identify man shot dead near amusement park

first_imgABC News(LEHIGH VALLEY, Pa.) — A man who was shot and killed by a police officer in Pennsylvania on Saturday has been identified as 44-year-old Joseph Santos.A video of Santos being shot while across the street from Dorney Park was posted on Facebook over the weekend. The video shows Santos, a resident of New Jersey, walking toward a police officer in an SUV, who orders him to get on the ground.As Santos continues to move toward the officer, five gun shots are fired and Santos can be seen falling to the ground.Santos was declared dead at Lehigh Valley Hospital, according to authorities. An autopsy will be performed on his body on Tuesday, police said.Lehigh County District Attorney Jim Martin told reporters that Santos was interfering with traffic and damaging cars.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Over 1,000 UK redundancies expected at G4S Cash Solutions

first_imgOver 1,000 UK redundancies expected at G4S Cash SolutionsBy Ashleigh Webber on 14 Jul 2020 in Collective redundancy, Coronavirus, Latest News, Job creation and losses, Personnel Today, Redundancy Two in five plan redundancies after furlough endsTwo in five (44%) organisations with staff on furlough say they will have to make some or all of their… Unemployment will rival early 1980s recession levels, top economist warnsThe Bank of England’s chief economist: ‘We’re going back to the 1980s basically.’ Previous Article Next Article Related posts: No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website ricochet64 / Shutterstock.com Security company G4S is planning to cut more than a quarter of jobs in its cash handling business amid the fall in cash transactions during the coronavirus crisis as people are encouraged to pay by card.The company has started a consultation process that could result in 1,150 redundancies across UK and Ireland, with the drivers of armoured vehicles who carry cash for businesses thought to be among those at risk.Redundancy selectionHow to ensure a fair redundancy selection processHow to approach redundancy as the furlough scheme winds downSurvivor’s guilt: supporting staff who have avoided redundancyIt said the drop in cash transactions was partly driven by an increase in contactless payments, which have been encouraged by many retailers to reduce the spread of Covid-19.However, G4S signalled that it was having problems shortly before the coronavirus lockdown when it reported a £91m loss for 2019.The company said it hopes to find alternative jobs within G4S for those affected by the redundancies at G4S Cash Solutions UK.“Following a review of our cash solutions operational footprint in the UK, we are proposing to reshape the business to better align it with the changing needs of our customers,” said G4S Cash Solutions UK managing director Paul van der Knaap.“Regrettably, this will result in a reduction in headcount and today we have entered into a period of consultation with affected staff.Roger Jenkins, national officer for the GMB union, said the cash industry was “on a knife edge”.“These cuts are devastating for our members and their families. GMB will fight to the end for every single job,” he said.Last week the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development warned that UK unemployment could reach almost 15% if there was a second wave of coronavirus infections, and could soar to 11.7% in Q3 2020 even if the epidemic is under control.Latest HR job opportunities on Personnel TodayBrowse more human resources jobslast_img read more

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Expanded 9/11 Memorial in Indianapolis one year away

first_img Facebook Google+ By Network Indiana – September 11, 2020 0 303 Twitter WhatsApp Pinterest Pinterest Facebook By TSgt Michael Holzworth [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons One year from now, you will likely be able to make the pilgrimage to an expanded 9 11 memorial in Indianapolis, which is now the Indiana 9 11 Memorial. For eight years the beams from the World Trade Center have reached toward the sky on West Ohio St., in downtown Indianapolis. The hope is that an expansion will make it a destination for all Hoosiers.“What we’re really interested in is to make sure that the generations that come after us, that they understand about why things happened,” said Brigadier General Stewart Goodwin,USAF (retired), exec. director of the Indiana War Memorials.“We’re in a time in our country where monuments have gotten a bad name because they didn’t meet a certain criteria. But, the fact is monuments are very important because they make physical records of what happened in our country.”The physical record for Indiana will be bigger and will contain a memorial to the members of the military who have been killed fighting terrorism since Sept. 11, 2001, and a memorial to Lt. Gen Tim Maude, a Hoosier and the most senior Army officer killed in action since World War II.“He was the…deputy chief of staff for personnel for the entire Army. Think about that, active Guard and Reserve, this was the officer in charge of all those personnel matters for all of those soldiers,” said Goodwin, who grew up knowing Maude.Maude was killed when American Airlines flight 77 crashed into the west side of the Pentagon.Goodwin said a piece of Indiana limestone from the wall of the Pentagon will also be mounted in the new space.He said that for the first few years of the memorial’s existence the military was not memorialized, in favor of a focus on first responders. So, the Indiana War Memorials Commission did not take on the responsibility of oversight when asked.“We didn’t want to step on anybody’s toes,” said Goodwin.But, in 2016, the commission relented because of the 5,000 military members who had been killed in combat.“Adding the military aspect of this takes nothing away from the police, fire, and the emergency medical services folks. What they went through and what they did, they will always be heroes.”Goodwin asked that people who are interested join the commission for an event at 10 a.m. Friday, at the memorial. The goal is to raise $450,000 for the memorial upgrades and to unveil them for the 20th anniversary. IndianaLocalNews Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Expanded 9/11 Memorial in Indianapolis one year away Previous articlePoll suggests support for Gov. Holcomb slippingNext articleMore than two dozen Greek houses at Purdue University ordered to quarantine Network Indianalast_img read more

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