Watch: Real estate brought the planet to the brink. Can it now save it?

first_img Tags Share via Shortlink Climate ChangeFifth WallThe REInterviewVideo Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink There’s a triple threat for real estate players who take a head-in-the-sand approach to climate change, according to Brendan Wallace and Greg Smithies: Tenants will refuse to rent from you, regulators will throw the book at you and the capital markets will make doing business very expensive for you.To Wallace and Smithies of Fifth Wall, however, the climate crisis is an opportunity for the real estate industry. Investing in Climate Tech will not only be crucial to survive as a business, they argue, but a source of great wealth. In the future, “being a real estate company means being a science investor,” Wallace said. “That is a massive mental leap.” Smithies explained the concept of “stranded assets” in the oil and gas industry: assets so energy-inefficient that they can no longer be financed. The same, he predicted, would soon happen to buildings that aren’t green.The duo — partners at the largest real estate-focused venture capital firm in the U.S. — sat down with The Real Deal’s Hiten Samtani for an extended conversation about real estate’s climate culpability and investing opportunities. Watch the video above for highlights and read the full interview here.hitsamty · Real estate’s climate reckoning and opportunity: Fifth Wall’s Brendan Wallace and Greg Smithieslast_img read more

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Webb & Brooker co-founder Eugene H. Webb dies

first_img Message* Tags Webb & Brooker was part of the development team behind Renaissance Plaza, a $61 million mixed-use construction project in Central Harlem that lived up to its name, spearheading a revival of new buildings and neighborhood improvements. He was also part of the groups that founded two prominent Black-owned banks: Carver Federal Savings Bank, which remains one of the country’s largest Black-owned banks, and Freedom National Bank, which closed in 1990. Webb served as board chairman for the latter.He was a member of many real estate trade groups, including the National Association of Real Estate Brokers and the Associated Builders & Owners of Greater New York. He was also the Governor Emeritus of the Real Estate Board of New York. He and Booker also founded the Harlem Real Estate Board, for which Webb served as president.In a joint statement provided to Real Estate Weekly, REBNY’s James Whelan and Douglas Durst said Webb “was a pioneer whose impact on diversity in this industry is largely unknown.”Contact Cordilia James Share via Shortlink Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Email Address* Full Name* Webb & Brooker co-founder Eugene H. Webb (Getty)Euguene H. Webb, a co-founder of the prominent New York real estate firm Webb & Brooker, died on Wednesday at the age of 102. Real Estate Weekly first reported the news.Webb co-founded the firm with George M. Brooker in 1968 during the Civil Rights Movement, and it went on to become one of Harlem’s most successful brokerages. Webb served as the firm’s chairman and was its senior policy-making officer for more than 40 years.His beginnings were slightly more humble: Webb was born in Red Level, Alabama on November 24, 1918, and grew up in a shotgun house in “the Bottom,” an area that was home to the town’s poorest residents. He eventually went on to serve two years in the Navy during World War II, the publication reported. After his honorable discharge, he moved to Harlem, attended Columbia University and began his real estate career after getting his license.Read moreIn memoriam: The industry titans who died in 2020 Stanley Chera, titan of NYC retail, dies of coronavirus Ben Lambert’s legacy: Eastdil founder brought Wall Street to real estate harlemNYC Brokersobituarylast_img read more

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WeWork will accept Bitcoin for membership fees

first_imgWeWork CEO Sandeep Mathrani. (Getty, WeWork)WeWork will begin to accept cryptocurrency, including Bitcoin and Ethereum, as a form of payment for its workspaces.The company announced Tuesday that customers can use the currency to pay for memberships; it will then use the cryptocurrency to pay its landlords and other vendors whenever possible, the Commercial Observer reported.“WeWork has always been at the forefront of innovative technologies, finding new ways to support our members,” CEO Sandeep Mathrani said in a statement to the publication. “It only makes sense for us to expand on the optionality we provide by adding cryptocurrency as an accepted form of payment for our members.”ADVERTISEMENTRead moreKent Swig launches his own cryptocurrencyBig on Bitcoin: Caruso now largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrencyWeWork in talks to go public via SPAC Message* Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Unsurprisingly, the cryptocurrency exchange platform Coinbase will be the first WeWork member to use that method of payment. WeWork will process the funds using the platform BitPay.In recent weeks, several other real estate companies have announced a newfound acceptance of cryptocurrency. Rick Caruso’s eponymous real estate firm announced that it will begin accepting rent payments in Bitcoin across its retail and commercial properties.Real estate investor Kent Swig recently secured $6 billion in gold reserves to back his new cryptocurrency, DIGau.[CO] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Email Address* Share via Shortlink Tags Commercial Real EstateCryptocurrencyWeWorklast_img read more

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Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria from geothermal environments in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago, with the proposal of Bacillus fumarioli sp. nov

first_imgAerobic endospore-forming bacteria were isolated from soils taken from active fumaroles on Mount Rittmann and Mount Melbourne in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and from active and inactive fumaroles on Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago. The Mt Rittmann and Mt Melbourne soils yielded a dominant, moderately thermophilic and acidophilic, aerobic endospore-former growing at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C, and further strains of the same organism were isolated from a cold, dead fumarole at Clinker Gulch, Candlemas Island. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis, SDS-PAGE and routine phenotypic tests show that the Candlemas Island isolates are not distinguishable from the Mt Rittmann strains, although the two sites are 5600 km apart, and 16S rDNA sequence comparisons and DNA relatedness data support the proposal of a new species, Bacillus fumarioli, the type strain of which is LMG 17489T.last_img read more

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Natural growth rates in Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba): II. Predictive models based on food, temperature, body length, sex, and maturity stage

first_imgWe used the instantaneous growth rate method to determine the effects of food, temperature, krill length, sex, and maturity stage on in situ summer growth of krill across the southwest Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean. The main aims were to examine the separate effects of each variable and to generate a predictive model of growth based on satellite-derivable environmental data. Both growth increments in length on moulting (GIs) and daily growth rates (DGRs, mm d-1) ranged greatly among the 59 swarms, from 0.58–15% and 0.013–0.32 mm d-1. However, all swarms maintained positive mean growth, even those in the low chlorophyll a (Chl a) zone of the central Scotia Sea. Among a suite of indices of food quantity and quality, large-scale monthly Chl a values from SeaWiFS predicted krill growth the best. Across our study area, the great contrast between bloom and nonbloom regions was a major factor driving variation in growth rates, obscuring more subtle effects of food quality. GIs and DGRs decreased with increasing krill length and decreased above a temperature optimum of 0.5°C. This probably reflects the onset of thermal stress at the northern limit of krill’s range. Thus, growth rates were fastest in the ice edge blooms of the southern Scotia Sea and not at South Georgia as previously suggested. This reflects both the smaller size of the krill and the colder water in the south being optimum for growth. Males tended to have higher GIs than females but longer intermoult periods, leading to similar DGRs between sexes. DGRs of equivalent-size krill tended to decrease with maturity stage, suggesting the progressive allocation of energy toward reproduction rather than somatic growth. Our maximum DGRs are higher than most literature values, equating to a 5.7% increase in mass per day. This value fits within a realistic energy budget, suggesting a maximum carbon ration of ~20% d-1. Over the whole Scotia Sea/South Georgia area, the gross turnover of krill biomass was ~1% d-1.last_img read more

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External nutrient inputs into terrestrial ecosystems of the Falkland Islands and the Maritime Antarctic region

first_imgAntarctic terrestrial ecosystems are nutrient-poor and depend for their functioning in part on external nutrients. However, little is known about the relative importance of various sources. We measured external mineral nutrient sources (wind blown material, precipitation and guano) at three locations, the cold temperate oceanic Falkland Islands (51°76′S), and the Maritime Antarctic Signy (60°71′S) and Anchorage Islands (67°61′S). These islands differ in the level of vegetation development through different environmental constraints and historical factors. Total mineral nitrogen input differed considerably between the islands. During the 3 month summer period it amounted to 18 mg N m−2 on the Falkland Islands and 6 and 102 mg N m−2 at Signy and Anchorage Islands, respectively. The high value for Anchorage was a result of guano deposition. By measuring stable isotopic composition (δ15N) of the different nitrogen sources and the dominant plant species, we investigated the relative utilisation of each source by the vegetation at each island. We conclude that external mineral nitrogen inputs to Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems show great spatial variability, with the local presence of bird (or other vertebrate) colonies being particularly significant.last_img read more

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Recent elevation changes of Svalbard glaciers derived from repeat track ICESat altimetry

first_imgWe have tested three methods for estimating 2003–2008 elevation changes of Svalbard glaciers from multitemporalICESat laser altimetry: (a) linear interpolation of crossover points between ascending and descendingtracks, (b) projection of near repeat-tracks onto common locations using Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), and(c) least-squares fitting of rigid planes to segments of repeat-track data assuming a constant elevation changerate. The two repeat-track methods yield similar results and compare well to the more accurate, but sparselysampled, crossover points. Most glacier regions in Svalbard have experienced low-elevation thinningcombined with high-elevation balance or thickening during 2003–2008. The geodetic mass balance (excludingcalving front retreat or advance) of Svalbard’s 34,600 km2 glaciers is estimated to be −4.3±1.4 Gt y−1,corresponding to an area-averaged water equivalent (w.e.) balance of−0.12±0.04 mw.e. y−1. The largest icelosses have occurred in the west and south, while northeastern Spitsbergen and the Austfonna ice cap havegained mass. Winter and summer elevation changes derived from the same methods indicate that the spatialgradient in mass balance is mainly due to a larger summer season thinning in the west and the south than in thenortheast. Our findings are consistent with in-situ mass balance measurements from the same period,confirming that repeat-track satellite altimetry can be a valuable tool for monitoring short term elevationchanges of Arctic glaciers.last_img read more

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Highly temporally resolved response to seasonal surface melt of the Zachariae and 79N outlet glaciers in northeast Greenland

first_imgThe seasonal response to surface melting of the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream outlets, Zachariae and 79N, is investigated using new highly temporally resolved surface velocity maps for 2016 combined with numerical modeling. The seasonal speedup at 79N of 0.15 km/yr is suggested to be driven by a decrease in effective basal pressure induced by surface melting, whereas for Zachariae its 0.11 km/yr seasonal speedup correlates equally well with the breakup of its large ice mélange. We investigate the influence 76 km long floating tongue at 79N, finding it provides little resistance and that most of it could be lost without impacting the dynamics of the area. Furthermore, we show that reducing the slipperiness along the tongue-wall interfaces produces a velocity change spatially inconsistent with the observed seasonal speedup. Finally, we find that subglacial sticky spots such as bedrock bumps play a negligible role in the large-scale response to a seasonally enhanced basal slipperiness of the region.last_img read more

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Prep Sports Roundup: 4/10

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailBoys SoccerRegion 14DELTA, Utah-Jager Springer scored twice and the Delta Rabbits outlasted American Leadership 6-4 in double overtime Tuesday in Region 14 boys soccer action. Brayden Gonder, Jayce Allen and Sam Clark also scored in the win for the Rabbits.NEPHI, Utah-Preston Goodrich and Kevin Urzua each scored and the Union Cougars doubled up Juab 2-1 in Region 14 boys soccer action Tuesday. Brock England found the net for the Wasps in the loss.Region 15RICHFIELD, Utah-Parker Sermon scored twice and the Emery Spartans waxed Richfield 2-1 Tuesday in Region 15 boys soccer action. Sam Kemp scored in defeat for the Wildcats.MONROE, Utah-Deklynd Chant, Jackson Sorensen, Juan Gonzalez and Richard Shumway all scored as the Grand Red Devils blanked South Sevier 4-0 in Region 15 boys soccer action Tuesday.MANTI, Utah-Noah Munoz lit the lamp twice, leading Manti to a 5-2 win over North Sanpete Tuesday in Region 15 boys soccer action. Brian Chavez, Ernesto Durant and Trace Boggess also scored for the Templars in victory. Louis Rodriguez had a goal in the loss for the Hawks.Region 18HURRICANE, Utah-Aron Trejo scored twice, but it wasn’t enough as Diamond Ranch edged Millard 4-3 in Region 18 boys soccer action Tuesday.BEAVER, Utah-Daniel Magana, Konner Beard and Walter LeBaron all scored as the Beaver Beavers waxed Parowan 3-1 Tuesday in Region 18 boys soccer action.SoftballRegion 14NEPHI, Utah-Cali Fossat had three home runs and the Carbon Dinos outgunned Juab 17-11 in Region 14 softball action Tuesday.Region 15MT. PLEASANT, Utah-Addelyn Brotherson went yard and doubled and the North Sanpete Hawks waxed Richfield 16-1 Tuesday in Region 15 softball action.Baseball2-A NorthGUNNISON, Utah-Rocky Bringhurst homered and doubled and earned the win on the mound as the North Sevier Wolves smacked Gunnison 7-2 in 2-A North baseball action Tuesday. Shawn Sorenson added a double in the win for the Wolves.2-A SouthPAROWAN, Utah-Alex Hollingshead and Porter Hollingshead each tripled, helping the Beaver Beavers to an 11-4 win over Parowan Tuesday in 2-A South baseball action. Hunter Hafen added two doubles for the Beavers, while Crayton Hollingshead and Davis Heslington also doubled in the win. Heslington also took the win on the mound for the Beavers.FILLMORE, Utah-Hayes Monroe and Slade Sheriff each doubled and Tyson Aburto went the distance on the mound, throwing a complete game in Millard’s 9-0 win over Kanab in 2-A South baseball action Tuesday.Region 14NEPHI, Utah-Damon Davidson and Talon Mangelson each went yard as the Juab Wasps overpowered Delta 12-2 Tuesday in Region 14 baseball action. Bradyn Nielson doubled in the loss for the Rabbits.Region 15CASTLE DALE, Utah-Koda Alton tripled and Cade Brazier earned the win on the mound as the Emery Spartans stonewalled Manti 7-2 in Region 15 baseball action Tuesday. Adam Huff tripled and Jace Miller doubled for the Templars in the loss.MT. PLEASANT, Utah-Emmitt Hafen belted a pair of doubles, leading Richfield to a 12-4 win over North Sanpete Tuesday in Region 15 baseball action. Nathan Winters, Payson Reed and Trey Roundy each doubled for the Wildcats as well in the win. Written by April 10, 2018 /Sports News – Local Prep Sports Roundup: 4/10 Tags: Baseball/Boys Soccer/Manti/Richfield/Softball Brad Jameslast_img read more

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Ex-cheerleaders offer to end lawsuit against NFL for $1

first_img Beau Lund FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock/Thinkstock(MIAMI) — Two former NFL cheerleaders who are suing the league for discrimination said they are not in it for the money.Former Miami Dolphins cheerleader Kristan Ware and former New Orleans Saints cheerleader Bailey Davis are offering to end their discrimination cases for just $1 a piece if NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and league lawyers would agree to a meeting.“This was never about money for me,” Davis told ABC News. “This is about having respect for our sport and standing up for our sport and standing up for women.”If they were to meet with Goodell, the women said they hope to address the list of concerns from dozens of cheerleaders, which include allegations of harassment from fans, low pay, long hours and strict rules on everything from weight to social media use.“They could ignore us or listen to us and then do nothing — and I understand that risk,” said Sara Blackwell, the women’s lawyer. “But I hope they have a real legitimate discussion with us, because I feel like we are on the same side.”Ware, a Dolphins cheerleader for three seasons beginning in 2014, said she felt compelled to quit a couple of weeks prior to the end of her contract in spring 2017 because she felt “she was just not accepted on the team if she was a Christian,” according to the complaint filed this month with the Florida State Labor Board.Ware says in the complaint that although she was co-captain of the cheerleading team and a fan favorite, she suffered harassment from some representatives of the squad because of her social media postings about her faith. She claims her decision to remain a virgin until marriage also adversely affected her.Ware contends that problems began after she posted a photo of her April 10, 2016, baptism on her public Twitter, Instagram and Facebook pages.Ware said she had not publicized her decision to wait to have sex until marriage but that the topic had come up months earlier, in fall of 2015, during a conversation with fellow Dolphins cheerleaders in front of other staff.The Dolphins responded to Ware’s complaint in a statement to ABC News on April 13: “We are seriously committed to providing a positive work environment for everyone associated with the organization. We hold every member of our organization to the same standards and do not discriminate as it relates to gender, race and religious beliefs.”Ware alleges in her complaint that in her annual tryout-interview in spring 2016, she was told her she was “not allowed to speak about anything related to her virginity to anyone” and that she “needed to develop into a woman.”A few months later, in September 2016, the cheerleading director and coaches told the co-captains, captains and some other cheerleaders that they could change their Instagram accounts to Dolphin Instagram accounts “under certain conditions,” Ware alleges in the complaint, adding that they were told that on their Dolphin Instagram accounts they were to talk about “fashion and fitness and cheerleading.”Ware claims that when she said she wanted to continue to “share her faith, post Bible verses and to be a role model for little girls” on Instagram, she was told by one of the coaches that “you cannot be ‘too much. You cannot mention Jesus or anything like that.’”The complaint further alleges that a month after the discussion about Instagram, the cheerleading director became physically aggressive with Ware at a fashion show for the Dolphins.Ware said her breaking point came in April 2017 after she was asked by the Dolphins to write a motivational blog post for women trying out for the cheerleading team, and some of her allusions to her faith in the post were removed.“I was told that I wasn’t allowed to mention God, and what really broke my heart is seeing how public football players can be about their faith,” Ware told ABC News.“Dolphin football players are allowed to maintain and express their faith in any way,” the complaint alleges. “Several players prayed on the 50-yard line before a game. They profess their faith online, on social media, to fellow players, to the public.”Ware’s allegations followed a complaint filed in March by Davis, who was with the New Orleans Saints cheering squad.Davis alleges in her complaint to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that she was fired on Jan. 23, 2018, for posting a photo of herself on Instagram wearing a one-piece bodysuit, breaking a rule that prohibits cheerleaders from posting revealing images on social media, a rule that her complaint says does not apply to men.“The players can post whatever they want on social media. … They can post shirtless and in the gym,” Davis told ABC News. “We can’t post in lingerie or a semi-nude, and it’s discriminating because for women to do that, it’s seen as something sexual, but when a guy does it, it’s seen as athletic.”The Saints deny that Davis was discriminated against because she is female.“The New Orleans Saints is an equal opportunity employer, and denies that Ms. Davis was discriminated against because she is female,” the NFL organization said in a statement to ABC News. “The Saints will defend these allegations in due course and in the appropriate forum, and the organization is confident that its policies and workplace rules will withstand legal scrutiny.”In response to the recent cheerleader complaints, the NFL told ABC News in a statement, “The NFL and all NFL member clubs support fair employment practices. Everyone who works in the NFL, including cheerleaders, has the right to work in a positive and respectful environment that is free from any and all forms of harassment and discrimination, and fully complies with state and federal laws. Our office will work with our clubs in sharing best practices and employment-related processes that will support club cheerleading squads within an appropriate and supportive workplace.”The league has until May 4 to accept or reject the deal proposed by Ware and Davis.“I don’t think that anyone has to say, ‘I was wrong’ or ‘I’m sorry,’” Blackwell said in regards to her clients. “I don’t care about any of that. My clients don’t care about that. What we want is change.”The NFL declined to comment in regards to the offer.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written bycenter_img April 25, 2018 /Sports News – National Ex-cheerleaders offer to end lawsuit against NFL for $1last_img read more

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