The Spanish revolution

first_imgThe Spanish revolutionOn 16 Sep 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previously regarded as a backwater with little interest in developing itspeople, the HR mantra in Spain is no longer ‘manana’ but ‘estrategia’ andleading the revolution is its HR society president, Mateo Borras. Liz HallreportsSpain has undergone a transformation when it comes to HR practices. Not onlyhas it embraced developments such as knowledge management, e-learning andstrategy, but Mateo Borrss, president of the Spanish equivalent of theChartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), believes the best wayto make impact is to work with traditional rivals to ensure HR has asubstantial voice in business. With David Beckham’s arrival at Real Madrid dominating both Spanish andEnglish news in recent weeks, football metaphors spring to mind when discussingthe state of play of HR practice in Spain with Borras. Asked where Spain would figure in an international league of HR practice,Borr s chuckles: “First division, of course.” Gone are the days when Spain was considered an HR backwater, andfar-reaching HR practices are now high on the agenda in Spain’s businesses. Recent years have seen an influx of foreign multinationals into Spain andindigenous multinationals such as oil company Repsol, telecoms giant Telefonicaand energy firm Endesa have gained firmer footings globally. “Spain has leapt forwards HR-wise and is very much taking part in thecreation and generation of HR policy rather than just complying with policiesdrawn up by others,” says Borras, who is in the third year of a four-yeartenure as president of the Asociaci¢n Espanola de Directores de Personal(AEDIPE). Borras is also director of HR and social affairs at 3,500-strong carmanufacturer Nissan Motor Ibérica in Barcelona which he joined in 1986. In recent years he has witnessed a transformation in the role of the Spanishpersonnel director. As in the UK and other European countries, this has beenmarked by a shift away from the more traditional roles of administration andmanagement towards a more strategic role. “The HR function in Spain is increasingly about strategy. Until recently,the function has been about implanting and applying policies drawn upelsewhere, now it is about drawing up strategies for line managers to apply andabout acting as internal consultants to line management,” saysBorr s. As he sees it, the most important task for the HR profession in Spain – andEurope as a whole – is to gain staff commitment and tie it in with company’svalues. “Commitment is very fashionable. What does this mean? It is aboutmaximising communication, decentralisation and personal development,” heexplains. “I am promoting this commitment, where the worker feels a senseof what is going on in the company and readily participates.” According to Borras, it is up to HR to spearhead this change process.”What is HR’s role in this – to lead this process of change towards aculture of trust, knowledge and commitment, fostering communication,decentralisation and empowerment,” he says. Borr s says there has been a shift in HR values with trust, knowledgeand staff commitment coming to the fore. “The HR profession is now moreabout giving weight to principles rather than rules. These days, we are talkingmuch more about self-responsibility, trust and knowledge rather than theability to follow instructions clearly and concisely.” Borras highlights knowledge management – gesti¢n de conocimiento – as one ofthe key items on Spanish HR’s agenda. “Spanish organisations, particularly the financial sector, are workingvery seriously in the areas of personal development and knowledge management,”he says. “One of the greatest roles for today’s HR director is that ofmanaging knowledge in the widest sense of being capable of sharing people’stalents with the rest of the organisation – of maximising adaptability andflexibility.” Along with knowledge management, e-learning, managing the decentralisationof HR and empowering line managers are also high on the agenda for many SpanishHR professionals. “We are seeing a growth in the number ofdecentralisation projects in Spanish businesses, and developing line managersis becoming much more important,” says Borras. AEDIPE recently named telecoms firms Alcatel and Telefonica as among thoseexhibiting best practice in e-learning. And in terms of knowledge management,Borras cites Caja Madrid as running a very good model. The savings bank alsorecently won the accolade of Spain’s top place to work in the 2003 Great Placeto Work list published by business school ESADE and the European Commission’sGreat Place to Work initiative. Nissan is currently in the early stages of developing a Europe-wide list ofcompetencies for line managers. It is working on a pilot scheme which willincorporate coaching, recognition and management skills. Four years ago, the 6,000-strong Nissan Spain, which has two plants inBarcelona and one in Madrid, embarked upon an empowerment programme for linemanagers, with the slogan ‘Que cerramos la ventanilla de’ – ‘We’re shutting thepersonnel office’. The programme, which is still ongoing, has involved HR handing over responsibilityfor small tasks such as handling medical problems to supervisors who dealdirectly with medical services. And staff no longer clock-in, but have linemanagers responsible for their movements. “These things may seem petty, but they’re not. The added value comesfrom the supervisors feeling empowered and that they now have to talk to staffdirect rather than just supervising them,” says Borras. The new competency framework will consolidate this previous work. “We will be looking very closely at individual knowledge,” saysBorras. AEDIPE, which was set up 39 years ago, has a 600-strong membership splitbetween some 35 per cent HR consultants and 65 per cent HR directors inorganisations in Spain. Borras is very aware that HR consultants are a fast-growinggroup and is anxious that AEDIPE should cater equally for them. AEDIPE also has an HR development arm FUNDIPE (Fundaci¢n para el Desarrollode la Funci¢n de Recursos Humanos. And research and development is an areaBorr s is very keen to expand. “We still have a great deal of work to do in getting involved withacademia compared with the CIPD which is 100 years ahead of us,” he says. Since taking the helm of AEDIPE, Borras has made it his mission torevolutionise the organisation, updating its image and making it much lesselitist. AEDIPE’s magazine has been revamped and Borras has set about forgingcloser links with other HR bodies and event organisers who would havetraditionally have been deemed rivals. Borras says there is a crisis right now in terms of the growing number ofassociations, and trying to harness what each has to offer is a constantchallenge. “Before, we were the main meeting point, the reference for the wholeprofession. Now, apart from HR publications, we still represent somewherepeople can come to if they have a problem, but there are many annual eventssuch as [the exhibition] Capital Humano.” Borras also plans to dramatically change the face of AEDIPE’s annualthree-day congress, held this year in C¢rdoba. “If our role is not to defend the profession like a law college, wemust make the most of the synergy of the different organisations, making themost of all the tools available.” This year will see congress delegates taking a much more active role,participating in workshops rather than just sitting back in lectures. “In the past, the congress was like a holiday or escape for delegates.That doesn’t work any more. What we need is debate, to share information,”he says. Borr s has also stepped up AEDIPE’s efforts to share informationbetween the association’s eight regional groups – its central Madrid-basedgroup is the biggest followed by Catalonia – and with other HR bodies such asthe European Association of Personnel Management. Along with about 35 other professional bodies representing some 35,000members, it has also joined forces to form top management group CEDE(Confederaci¢n Espa¤ola de Directivos y Ejecutivos), giving AEDIPE more of avoice. “We are almost a lobby group now; regularly treading slippery terrain,holding quarterly meetings with parliamentary representatives,” saysBorras, who is vice-president of the CEDE management group. Borras acknowledges that, in common with other European countries, theSpanish HR profession is frequently dictated to by trends manufactured byinternational consultants. Take a look through any of the Spanish profession’spublications and they are peppered with English phrases such as ‘knowledgemanagement’. But Borras welcomes these fashions as a chance to take a freshlook at things. “The fashions imposed by multinational HR consultants – such asindividual knowledge – do not worry me as they serve as a catalyst forchange.” Which ties in nicely with the Borras vision for the Spanish HR function in adecade’s time. “I’d like the HR function to be without any short-term executiveresponsibilities, to exist solely as an internal consultancy,” he says.”Talking about visions is all very well, but what is important is whethersomething will really be useful. It is vital to have a common aim and referencepoint within the organisation and then secure staff commitment to this aim. Forme, the main aim for HR is to manage this and nothing else.” WeblinksAsociaci¢n Espanola de Directores de Personal www.aedipe.esSpanish statistics office www.ine.esSpanish employment office www.inem.esFactfile– Spain is the eighth-largest countryin the OECD– It is the world’s largest investor in Latin America– It is the sixth-largest car manufacturer in the world– Its population numbered around 41 million in 2002 – Unemployment in May 2003 stood at 8.64 per cent– The Gross Domestic Product (GDP) grew by 2 per cent by end of2002 and is predicted to grow by 3 per cent by mid-2004– Spain’s service sector is its main contributor to GDP,followed by industry which together account for 90 per cent of its GDP.Agriculture now accounts for 4 per cent– Inflation stands at around 4 per centSource: Ministry of Economy,Instituto Nacional de Estadistica Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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New CBD Oil Law Clarifies Murky Regulations

first_imgBy Abrahm HurtTheStatehouseFile.comINDIANAPOLIS —After living with diabetes for 51 years, Dr. Pamela Reilly has been able to lower her insulin levels by 45 percent.She used CBD oil—also known as cannabidiol—to make that change.Reilly, a naturopathic physician who started the Good Works Wellness Research in Fishers, has seen the impact that CBD oil has had on her own life and her clients. That is why she supported legislation that legalizes the sale of a low-THC cannabis extract.Last week, Gov. Eric Holcomb signed into law Senate Enrolled Act 52, which allows all Hoosiers to buy and use CBD oil that contains less than .3 percent THC, the substance that gives marijuana users a high.“The bill that the legislature passed is exactly the bill that I asked for at the very outset,” Holcomb said. “I wanted to make sure we knew the levels. I wanted to make sure we had labeling and that the folks that needed this had access to it and they do.”Reilly said she is hopeful the new law will eliminate the confusion and misrepresentation of CBD oil.“What I love about Senate Bill 52 is that there’s now no question about whether it’s legal or not,” Reilly said. “And there shouldn’t have been before, but multiple media stations misreported. They didn’t do adequate research, and that created a huge amount of confusion.”Part of the confusion came from Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill. In November, he released an official opinion declaring that under state law, CBD oil was illegal in Indiana. He followed up with a column published Dec. 14 in The Indianapolis Star.“There is no doubt, as a matter of legal interpretation, that products or substances containing cannabidiol remain unlawful in Indiana as well as under federal law,” he wrote in the column.Kristen Williams, digital director of communications for Hill, said the attorney general’s position on CBD oil as expressed in his op-ed still stands today. His office declined to provide his response to the new law.Confusion about the legality of CBD oil usage began during the 2017 session after legislators approved limited use of the product by patients with epilepsy. That action led lawmakers to clarify the law during the 2018 session.Sen. Michael Young, R-Indianapolis, said he authored the bill because people have benefitted from using CBD oil to treat a variety of problems like epilepsy, cancer, and anxiety.“Since we are limiting how much THC can be in the product, there is no risk for people to use this to get high,” he said in a statement after the bill passed the Senate. “My hope with this bill is that more Hoosiers will be able to use this product to treat their ailments.”Reilly said she has seen her patients benefit from the use of cannabidiol and in some cases the changes in health are dramatic.“I truly see miracles every single day,” Reilly said. “I have clients that have been able to work with their doctor to get off medications. I have children with ADD and ADHD that are now doing fine in school. I can just go on and on and on.”The new law requires manufacturers to have each batch of the product tested in order to ensure it has less than .3 percent THC. It also mandates that products sold in Indiana to have a QR code on the label linking it to a document containing information on the batch, such as the ingredients and the name of the company that manufactured the ingredients.Retailers have until July 1 to make sure all CBD products they’re selling meet the new labeling requirements.However, there are still concerns about the oil’s legality even with the recent legislation’s passage. Sen. Aaron Freeman, R-Indianapolis, said he opposed the bill because it’s illegal under federal code.“I don’t have a concern about anything with the products,” he said. “My concern is that the federal government has listed them as a Schedule 1 narcotic drug. It is illegal to possess under federal law and pharmacists cannot dispense it legally.”Rep. Matt Pierce, D-Bloomington, supported the bill but said the new requirements for regulating the substance and even more may be done with the legislation for the third, consecutive legislative session.“I think we’re going to have to come back and fix this next year, but we’ve got to at least get it legal,” he said on the House floor.Reilly said she did not believe the new packaging and labeling requirements would hurt businesses that sell CBD oil because it’s a one-time change.“Once they walk through that process, it will be business as usual. They have enough time to do that, so it’s not cumbersome,” she said. “Is it convenient? No, but I don’t feel like it’s a big deal.”FOOTNOTE: Abrahm Hurt is a reporter for TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.Print Friendly, PDF & EmailFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Barbara Ruth Bromhead

first_imgBarbara Ruth Bromhead, age 85, of Marmora, NJ passed away Tuesday, November 28, 2017 at Shore Medical Center in Somers Point, NJ. Mrs. Bromhead was born May 2, 1932 in Roxborough, PA and was formerly of Ocean City before moving to Marmora seven years ago.She was a member of Union Chapel By-The-Sea Church and a former member of First Presbyterian Church in Ocean City. Mrs. Bromhead was a loving, dedicated wife and mother.Surviving are her husband of 66 years, John Bromhead of Marmora, NJ, four sons: John R. (Nancy) Bromhead of Clifton , VA, Mark S. (Nancy) Bromhead of Orlando, FL, D. Alexander (Amy) Bromhead of Stuart, FL and Timothy G. (Amy) Bromhead of Marmora, NJ. Also surviving are 15 grandchildren, four great grandchildren and a sister, Pauline Myers of Ocean City, NJ.Her Funeral service will be offered Monday, December 4th at 10 o’clock from Union Chapel By-The-Sea Church, 5501 Asbury Avenue, Ocean City, NJ, where friends may call from nine o’clock until the time of service. Burial will follow in Seaside Cemetery, Palermo.Memorial contributions in her memory may be made to Union Chapel By-The-Sea Church, Ocean City, NJ 08226.For condolences to the family, visit www.godfreyfuneralhome.com.last_img read more

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Guidance: Child death overview panels: contacts

first_imgContact details of the person responsible for dealing with child death notifications in every child death overview panel (CDOP) in England.CDOPs conduct case reviews to help prevent further child deaths. You can find out more about their responsibilities in the working together to safeguard children guidance.Please contact us at [email protected] to request updates to this spreadsheet.last_img

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Redundancies follow loss of contract for W C Rowe

first_imgCornish bakery firm W C Rowe is making around 40 redundancies following a major contract loss, believed to be with Tesco.British Baker understands the Penryn bakery firm, which employs more than 500 members of staff, has lost its contract with the supermarket chain. However, Tesco refused to confirm this as the magazine went to press.In an announcement last month, Rowe’s said: “We can confirm that, due to the loss of a significant production contract at our bakery on Kernick Industrial Estate in Penryn, we are now in the process of realigning staff numbers to make sure they are in line with production volumes. We regret that this has led to some redundancies from the Kernick site, which mainly produces our breads and sweet products.”We have redeployed a number of people to one of the growth areas of the business namely our bakery on the Bickland Industrial Estate in Falmouth, which produces all of our pasties and other savoury products.”Rowe’s set out a five-year development strategy last July, proposing to expand its manufacturing facilities and take over the new industrial unit on the Bickland Industrial Estate.The firm added that it still had ambitious growth plans for this part of its business and hoped to continue creating new local jobs.Dave Dash, south-western regional officer for the Bakers Food and Allied Workers Union, said that none of Rowe’s employees were members of its union, despite efforts to encourage them to join.Rowe’s produces pasties, sausage rolls, pastries and baked goods from its 20 retail bakery locations in the south west and south of England, as well as six in-store own-branded counters at Asda outlets in St Austell, Plymouth, Falmouth, Poole, Bournemouth and Castlepoint. The company supplies a number of its products to UK super-market chains including Asda and Sainsbury’s.last_img read more

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Brandi Carlile & Maren Morris Perform Powerful “Natural Woman” Duet In Honor Of Aretha Franklin & Carole King [Watch]

first_imgOn Wednesday night, CMT honored the brightest stars in the world of country music at their annual Artists of the Year ceremony at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center in Nashville. This year, however, the roster of honorees was notably different from previous editions of the ceremony: All of the 2018 honorees were women. Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert, Maren Morris, Kelsea Ballerini, Hillary Scott, Karen Fairchild and Kimberly Schlapman were among the talented females recognized. The women-centric event was a coup for the country world, which has long been overwhelmingly male-dominated.As part of the award show’s live entertainment, two powerful vocalists—Maren Morris and Brandi Carlile—delivered an appropriately stirring rendition of “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman”, the Carole King-, Gerry Goffin-, and Jerry Wexler-penned anthem popularized by the late Queen of Soul, Aretha Franklin. The performance was introduced by Smokey Robinson, who grew up alongside Aretha in Detroit and remembers her as one of his oldest friends.Notes CMT News, Maren Morris has been covering the song on tour on a regular basis since Franklin’s passing earlier this year. She has also cited Carole King as one of the biggest influences on her own songwriting work. In a recent interview with CMT, Morris explained the impact of seeing Franklin perform “Natural Woman” in King’s honor at her Kennedy Center induction ceremony. As Maren explained,When Aretha passed, I remember seeing that video from the Kennedy Center from a couple years ago, where Aretha was honoring Carole. Just the power this woman had in these really tumultuous racially tense times, gave this R&B singer one of the biggest songs of her entire career. And it just didn’t matter the color of anyone’s skin, or their sex for that matter. They panned the camera to Barack Obama who was crying at ‘Natural Woman’ because it hits all of us. We all have mothers, wives, and sisters.You can watch Brandi Carlile & Maren Morris perform “Natural Woman” at the CMT Artists of the Year ceremony below, as well as a clip of Morris’ award acceptance speech:Brandi Carlile & Maren Morris – “Natural Woman” [Carole King/Aretha Franklin cover][Video: CMT]Maren Morris Artists of the Year Acceptance Speech[Video: CMT][H/T CMT News]last_img read more

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Lime bikes to be removed from South Bend, tri-campus community

first_imgLime, the transport company which operates and maintains the green, dock-less Lime Bikes in South Bend and the tri-campus community, will remove all of its bicycles from South Bend as well as Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross by “mid-May,” an email from the University announced Friday. The bicycles have been in South Bend and on the campuses since the summer of 2017.“The effort is already underway,” the email said. “The mobility company, which is transitioning away from pedal bicycles in favor of electric bicycles and scooters, recently informed the University of this decision.”Lime will contact users with “balances on their Lime accounts” about refunds in the near future, the email said.The email said the University remains committed to sustainable transport.”The University remains committed to safe, sustainable and affordable transport solutions for students, faculty and staff, and will continue to explore opportunities for increased mobility on campus that do not contribute to transportation-related emissions,” the email said.Concerns or comments should be directed to [email protected], the email said.Tags: Lime, LimeBike, South Bend, sustainability, transportationlast_img read more

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Jamestown Woman Pleads Guilty To Maintaining A Drug House

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) BUFFALO – A Jamestown woman has plead guilty to maintaining a drug-involved premises.The U.S. Attorney’s Office says that Brandi Whitford, 24, took the plea Tuesday.Prosecutors say the charge carries a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison, and a $500,000 fine.Assistant U.S. Attorney Joshua A. Violanti, who is handling the case, stated that between September 2019 and October 23, 2019, the defendant and co-defendant Richard E. Kinsey Jr. used a residence on Newland Avenue in Jamestown, to manufacture, distribute, and use methamphetamine. On September 6, 2019, investigators executed a New York State search warrant at the residence, recovering three firearms.A fourth firearm was thrown from the residence during the execution of the search warrant. Investigators also recovered methamphetamine throughout the residence, approximately $12,045 in US currency, assorted ammunition, and drug paraphernalia, including scales and packaging material.Charges remain pending against defendant Kinsey. The fact that a defendant has been charged with a crime is merely an accusation, and the defendants are presumed innocent until and unless proven guilty.The plea is the result of an investigation by the Drug Enforcement Administration, under the direction of Special Agent-in-Charge Ray Donovan, New York Field Division; the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives, under the direction of Special Agent-in-Charge John B. Devito, New York Field Division; and the Jamestown Metro Drug Task Force, under the direction of Acting Jamestown Police Chief Timothy Jackson.Sentencing will be scheduled at a later date.last_img read more

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Idina Menzel Wants to Duet With You, Carly Rae Jepsen Does Windows & More Lessons of the Week

first_imgThis week on Broadway flew by, but before we let it go (“let it go…can’t hold it back anymore!”), let’s revisit some of the weird, wacky and wonderful stuff that happened over the last seven days. Check out everything we learned on the Great White Way this week!It’s Now OK to Sing ‘Let It Go’ In PublicA sing-along version of Frozen is hitting theaters nationwide. If you need some vocal tips, there are several thousand four-year-old fans (and some puppets) who really know how to nail Elsa’s emotional arc.HBO Isn’t Buying Patti LuPoneSorry, LuPone superfans, but the network isn’t biting on the People in Jersey pilot. If we ran HBO, we’d air the series between her laundromat sleeper hit Love Cycle and reruns of Life Goes On, but sadly, no one asked us.Peter Pan (Not Laura Benanti?) Will FlyNBC, it’s great you’re airing Peter Pan live, but aren’t you forgetting something? There aren’t any good roles for Sound of Music scene-stealer Laura Benanti. You could have done The Music Man or My Fair Lady, but nooo… And don’t even think about casting her as Nana.Jessie Mueller Lives in a Giant MusicalHere’s what we learned from Beautiful star Jessie Mueller’s vlog: She never stops singing, whether she’s making coffee or showing off her opening night zit. She’s like that hyper kid in drama class who was always running around belting showtunes and—wait, that was us.Mick Jagger Always Gets What He WantsRolling Stones frontman Mick Jagger wants to produce a Broadway show—no, not a big, flashy bio-musical about himself. Instead, he hopes to adapt his documentary about lesser-known backup singers, 20 Feet From Stardom, for the stage. What a mensch!Jean Valjean Now Has Enormous GunsRamin Karimloo wasn’t kidding when he said he was hitting the gym to play prisoner 24601 in Les Miz. Jean Valjean and Rocky Balboa and their six-packs should go on fitness dates together (Workout mash-up song: “Eye of the Tigers Come at Night”).LBJ Was (Practically) a Meth DealerWorried Bryan Cranston gave up Walter White for good? Fear not! He says his new role, President LBJ in All the Way, has more in common with the fearless antihero than we think. For instance, LBJ always cooks his Blue Magic in his undies. But really, who doesn’t?Meryl Streep Is a Matinee LadyOutside Mullingar star Debra Messing was pretty starstruck herself when eight-gajillion-time Oscar winner Meryl Streep stopped by after the Wednesday matinee. If you need us, we’ll be at the Friedman until we’ve absorbed every molecule of talent she might have left behind.Carly Rae Jepsen Wanted to Be a MaidElla would do anything to go to the ball, but new Cinderella headliner Carly Rae Jepsen’s sights are set a teensy bit lower: Her childhood goal was to play “Maid #3” in a Broadway show. Hey Carly, the floors at the Broadway.com offices are muddy, wanna come over?We Were Bradley Cooper’s First TimeThe Elephant Man star Bradley Cooper gave Broadway.com a shout-out at the SAG Awards—his Broadway.com Audience Choice Award for Three Days of Rain was the first (and only, until now) trophy he ever won! Was it good for you, Brad? Star Files Idina Menzelcenter_img View Commentslast_img read more

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Slipstream: A New Netflix for Outdoor Enthusiasts

first_imgA group of skiers from Vancouver saw a lack  of outdoor films and documentaries within the streaming market dominated by Netflix, Hulu, and YouTube. Many outdoor films require purchasing the movie for a price similar to subscribing to Netflix or a similar service. Why wasn’t there a provider that specialized in outdoor films?Slipstream has several different sections of movies including environmental, climbing, biking, running, skiing, surfing, and more, so what ever your sport, chances are Slipstream has you covered.  Beginning at just five dollars a month, subscribers receive unlimited access to over 300 outdoor movies and documentaries with more being added each week.Learn more here.last_img read more

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