USS Mount Whitney Participates in BALTOPS 2014

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today USS Mount Whitney Participates in BALTOPS 2014 View post tag: News by topic View post tag: USS Mount Whitney View post tag: BALTOPS View post tag: 2014 For three reservists in particular, Cmdr. William “Russ” Lewis, Electronics Technician 1st Class Steven Lamont, and Lt. Don Collins, the experience of serving their Annual Training (AT) duty during BALTOPS proves a unique and rewarding experience.This is the second BALTOPS exercise that Lewis has participated in. His first was in 2012, where he served in the Civil Military Affairs directorate for Strike Force NATO.“… every job is unique,” said Lewis, a Navy reservist from Chattanooga, Tennessee, who is the submarine syndicate lead for BALTOPS 2014. “You need to be flexible and figure out where you can be of the most benefit to that operation.”Lewis serves as the liaison to the German submarine operations authority to manage the undersea warfare aspect of the exercise, ensuring 22 safe and effective training evolutions.“As a submarine syndicate lead I’m kind of in a planning role, it’s all about water space management,” said Lewis.Training events span across the full range of capabilities beginning with familiarization serials before graduating to more complex maneuvers that involve undersea, surface and air assets practicing location techniques, sonar buoy drops and acquiring targeting solutions.Behind the scenes, ensuring successful training evolutions are supported by steady communications is Electronics Technician 1st Class Steven Lamont, who serves as a high frequency (HF) transmitter expert for BALTOPS 2014. For Lamont, the exercise was a novel experience.“This is my first time serving aboard a ship,” said Lamont, a reservist from Greenville, South Carolina, whose Navy career spans 16 years. “Overall the experience of seeing other countries, seeing other ships, pulling up beside them has been great.”Lamont, like Lewis, achieved success by remaining flexible.“When I first arrived onboard, I wasn’t really sure where I would be working or what I would be doing… it wasn’t long before I learned exactly where I was needed and started putting my skills to good use,” said Lamont, who works to repair HF transmitters to aid in ship-to-ship communications with the 30 naval vessels participating in BALTOPS this year.“We’re working on the HF transmitters that are being used by the different countries involved to stay connected to each other… I’ve been having a good time jumping in and seeing what I can fix while we’re here,” he added.Lamont is not the only reservist who was exposed to shipboard life for the first time.“The biggest thing for me was the opportunity to get on a ship. In my entire naval career I have yet to be on a ship until now,” said Lt. Don Collins of Knoxville, Tennessee, who serves as assistant communications officer for the exercise. “I’ve wanted the chance to serve on Mount Whitney specifically, so I jumped at the opportunity to finally do that… now I collect information and update reports regarding communications between Mount Whitney and other elements involved with BALTOPS,” said Collins.Those communications span across the BALTOPS force which consists of surface, subsurface and aviation assets from 14 nations that are training together to enhance interoperability and collective capabilities to foster regional stability.Collins believes it is the differences among the force that make it great.Until the exercise concludes, Lewis, Lamont and Collins continue to focus on the mission.“When I go on an exercise, I’m all Navy -24 hours a day- whatever it takes,” said Lewis.The three also agree that part of every reservist’s duty while serving their AT is representing the reserves.“I think every time we go on orders, we’re a walking advertisement… I introduce myself as a reservist, I’m proud of that,” said Lewis.Not far from a whiteboard where Lamont drafted a to-do list and was leading the repair of several radios and parts, Lamont echoed Lewis’ sentiments and made it a point to showcase leadership and Navy values to junior enlisted active duty Sailors he serves with aboard Mount Whitney.Now in its 42nd year, BALTOPS is an annual, multinational exercise with the goal of enhancing maritime capabilities across the full spectrum of military operations to support stability in the Baltic Sea.[mappress]Press Release, June 18, 2014; Image: MSC US Navy Authorities View post tag: Naval Several U.S. Navy reservists are underway onboard 6th Fleet’s flagship, USS Mount Whitney (LCC20) to conduct Baltic Operations (BALTOPS) 2014, a multinational maritime exercise which takes place June 6 -21. View post tag: americas View post tag: Participates View post tag: Navy USS Mount Whitney Participates in BALTOPS 2014 June 18, 2014 Share this articlelast_img read more

Read More
BAE Systems Upgrades Australia’s ANZAC Class Frigates

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today BAE Systems Upgrades Australia’s ANZAC Class Frigates October 8, 2015 BAE Systems Upgrades Australia’s ANZAC Class Frigates View post tag: Asia-Pacific View post tag: BAe Systems Sustainment teams on both sides of Australia are upgrading ANZAC class frigates HMAS Perth and HMAS Anzac to significantly increase their capability.Across each warship, BAE Systems Australia is delivering more than 15 complex engineering changes including enclosing the quarter deck, modifications to accommodate the MH-60 Romeo naval helicopters, relocation of the on-board gymnasium and radar cross section remediation works. One ship will also have an Electronic Surveillance Mast and supporting communications equipment installed.It will take more than 32,000 hours to complete the two major packages of work. HMAS Perth is being upgraded at the Common User Facility at Henderson in Western Australia and is due to be completed by early December.HMAS Anzac is in Sydney at Fleet Base East Garden Island with work due to be finished this month. HMAS Perth and HMAS Anzac underwent Anti Ship Missile Defence (ASMD) upgrades in 2011 and 2014 respectively at the Company’s Henderson facility in Western Australia.Since the In-Service Support began with the delivery of ANZAC ships from the initial build program at Williamstown shipyard, BAE Systems has been working as part of the ANZAC Alliance on a wide range of engineering design and integration tasks to introduce new capability, resulting in a fleet that is technologically advanced and highly capable of meeting all operational requirements.[mappress mapid=”17137″]Image: BAE Systems View post tag: Anzac Share this article Authorities View post tag: Frigates View post tag: Australialast_img read more

Read More
PODCAST: Beyond the logo

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A brand refresh involves much more than changing your logo or adding billboards.“That’s literally the last thing you do, and it takes the least amount of time,” says Anne Norman, senior vice president and chief marketing officer at UW Credit Union in Madison, Wis.  “The research, strategic choices, and internal executive team alignment are the most crucial and most time consuming to set yourself up to do the fun, sexy stuff everybody gets to see.”The $2.8 billion asset credit union recently unveiled a new brand identity and tagline, “Here For Every You,” built around supporting members at every step of their life’s journey, Norman says.“You can’t get to the point with a creative agency where you’re talking about things like color, type face, and iconography if you don’t have a clear, solid foundation of what you are and who you’re serving,” she says.last_img read more

Read More
INDOT work will impact county roads near State Road 46 near New Point

first_imgNew Point, In. — Indiana Department of Transportation maintenance crews from the Penntown Unit have been scheduled to replace culvert pipes next Monday, July 23at two county road locations bordering State Road 46 near New Point.Weather permitting, operations will begin at South County Line Road on the north side of S.R. 46 at 7 a.m.—closing the Franklin-Decatur County line road until noon.After noon, INDOT crews will move to C.R. 400 South/South Pocket Road, a half-mile east of the first location. They will excavate across the roadway at the north approach to S.R. 46 and replace the existing drainage pipe.  If more time is required to finish the installation, the county road will be reopened to overnight traffic, then closed again Tuesday morning for completion.Both pipes are 24-inches in diameter, measuring 40 feet in length.last_img read more

Read More
David Olwell is New Dean of Engineering at Saint Martin’s University

first_imgSubmitted by Saint Martin’s UniversityFr. Richard Cebula, O.S.B. Hall, the home of The Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering.The Saint Martin’s University community welcomes David H. Olwell, Ph.D., as professor and dean of the Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering. Olwell brings with him 25 years of experience on the faculty of West Point and the Naval Postgraduate School, where he also successfully led and significantly expanded the Department of Systems Engineering while serving as department chair.“I am delighted to have joined Saint Martin’s University,” says Olwell, a Seattle native who started in the position August 15. “It is exciting to have the chance to build on the initial successes of the University’s Engineering Initiative, and to help shape and grow the Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering as we move forward.”“I have really enjoyed the faculty, staff and students I have met and continue to meet, and I see my job as helping set the conditions for all to be fully successful in their academic and professional endeavors,” Olwell says. “To flourish, we need to understand our external environment and position ourselves to be the best value for our students, while keeping in mind and vigorously supporting the Benedictine and Catholic values that distinguish us.”Olwell’s family shares a history with the University and Saint Martin’s Abbey. His paternal grandmother’s brothers, Father Thomas “Russ” Hanley, O.S.B., and Father Maurice “Dick” Hanley, O.S.B., attended Saint Martin’s; both monks were ordained at Saint Martin’s Abbey; and Father Russ Hanley was a faculty member at Saint Martin’s for decades after his ordination in 1926. Cousins of Olwell’s mother were also students at Saint Martin’s.During his five-year term as chair of the systems engineering department at NPS, Olwell was responsible for major program development, marketing, faculty recruitment and faculty development. Under Olwell’s leadership, the department grew from a handful of graduate students to 400; from two faculty members to 31 and the department’s research program expanded from zero to more than $3 million last year. The departmental budget also increased from less than $500,000 to $6.7 million.“I know how to build and sustain high-quality engineering programs from scratch,” Olwell says. In its annual rankings of the top graduate schools in the nation, U.S. News and World Report this year listed the systems engineering department as 20th in the industrial, manufacturing and systems engineering category.Olwell was the co-principal investigator on a major multi-million dollar research project from 2009-2014 that defined the systems engineering body of knowledge and developed the reference curriculum for graduate system engineering education. He led a team of 70 academics and industry experts from around the world. There were two significant publications as a result. Together with Art Pyster, Ph.D., of the Stevens Institute of Technology, his co-lead, Olwell was recognized by the International Council on Systems Engineering in 2013 for these efforts.“Dr. David Olwell is a seasoned academic with extensive leadership experience in higher education; he is also a successful teacher-scholar with significant grant and research accomplishments,” says Molly Smith, Ph.D., provost and professor of English. “I look forward to working closely with Dave as we continue to extend the reach and reputation of the Hal and Inge Marcus School of Engineering.Olwell earned a doctorate in statistics with a minor in industrial engineering, a master’s degree in statistics and a master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Minnesota. He also earned a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the U.S. Military Academy.Olwell is a commissioner on the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) Engineering Accreditation Commission. He is a fellow of the American Council on Education. He is a former member of the Board of Directors for Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Monterey but resigned from the post when he relocated from Monterey to Lacey to join Saint Martin’s. Olwell says he hopes to find a similar volunteer opportunity in the Lacey area.Additionally, Olwell has served in a variety of positions with the Knights of Columbus in California, including grand knight, district deputy, faithful navigator, state fraternal activities chairman and conferring officer. Olwell says he plans to remain active in the Knights of Columbus. Facebook137Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Read More