Five things you should know about Alapati Leiua

first_imgIt’s rare to be given a chance to play for the All Blacks, and ever rarer to turn them down. But Leiua has chosen to represent the country of his birth, Samoa, at Test level. The reason? He wanted to be reunited with his older brother, Ofisa Treviranus, on the rugby field.  He said: “We had been a long time away from each other and it was definitely a factor for me in deciding where to play. It was tough to be away from each other.”London bro: Treviranus in actionFamily affairLeiua made his Test debut for Samoa at last summer’s Quadrangular Tournament in South Africa. His Test bow came in the 27-17 victory over Scotland, and he’s scored two tries in his five Test caps, all from the wing. He has played alongside his brother, blindside flanker Treviranus, in every Test match so far. The No 6, who now plays for London Irish, played alongside another older brother, Ray, also a flanker, for Connacht in 2007-08.Name gameWhen he’s tearing up the Adams Park pitch next season, you won’t want to look a fool in front of the other fans, so… his name is pronounced A-la-patty (Pati to his mates) Lay-oo-ah. Oggy oggy oggy! Watch Leiua in action below! By Bea Asprey LONDON WASPS have snapped up one of Super Rugby’s power houses in Alapati Leiua. He’s been formidable for the Hurricanes this season, and Wasps Director of Rugby Dai Young says: “He is powerful, has good feet and knows where the try line is.” But what else should we know about him?Double troubleThough Leiua’s favoured position is on the wing, he can play in the centre too. Now in his fifth year of Super Rugby with the Hurricanes, he switched to the midfield when Tim Bateman sustained a knee injury earlier this season. His current midfield partner? None other than Conrad Smith. The All Black has been encouraging him to talk more on the pitch, but says of the 25-year-old: “He’s a good rugby player. He’s got a smart footy brain so defensively I think it (playing centre) will come pretty naturally to him. He’ll make a good fist of it.”What Boks? Playing for Samoa last summerCrossing the Pacific Leiua moved to New Zealand as a youngster, and was adopted by his uncle, which led him to changing his surname. He wanted to pursue his dream of becoming a professional rugby player, and where better to do that than the country where they nurture the best team in the world? His move to Wellington and progression through rugby’s ranks has seen him turn out for the Vodafone Wellington Lions in the ITM Cup, and the city’s Super Rugby franchise, the Hurricanes, where he will finish the season before moving to London.He turned down New Zealandcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Triumphant Montpellier struggle to win popularity contest

first_img It’s hard for the French to love Montpellier. Admire them, respect them, yes, but affection? Few in France are fond of the Languedoc club who on Friday crushed Harlequins to win the European Challenge Cup. Jake White won’t care. As he said last week: “I’m not paid so that some people can be happy, I’m paid to win.”The South African coach has now banked one trophy and another could be his next month given Montpellier’s form in the Top 14. But in a country reared on the art of seduction, the French find Montpellier singularly charmless. “Cold and methodical,” was how Le Figaro newspaper described their Challenge Cup triumph, while another attributed a “cold pragmatism” to their methods.Top two: Jake White with Montpellier president Mohed Altrad. Photo: Getty ImagesIn Monday’s Midi Olympique, they called Montpellier a machine and lamented the fact that Thibault Privat, Nicolas Mas, Robins Tchale-Watchou and Francois Trinh-Duc had been omitted from the match-day squad. White was unapologetic for overlooking the Frenchmen. “The choices are difficult,” he said in the week before the final. “If I take the case of Francois Trinh-Duc, the sentimental thing would be to pick him for the match, but that’s not possible… my job is to select the best.”He’s right, of course. Rugby is a professional sport. Perhaps that’s why Montpellier won their European trophy and Racing 92 lost theirs. It’s hard to imagine White allowing an unfit fly-half to take the field – no matter who he was.Double time: Jesse Mogg scores the first of his two tries in the final: Photo: Getty ImagesBut the French cherish sentiment, and that’s why White’s Montpellier will never be clutched to the Gallic bosom in the way the all-conquering Toulouse side of a decade ago was. Even Toulon at their peak had a lovable rogue quality to them. Yes, it seemed at times that their president had more money than sense, but it was hard not to feel a certain warmth for a club that boasted such men as Jonny Wilkinson, Matt Giteau, Freddie Michalak and Bakkies Botha.Botha was one of four South Africans in the Toulon squad that beat Clermont in last season’s Champions Cup final; Montpellier fielded seven in the starting XV against Quins, prompting Midi Olympique to dub them the “Langueboks”. Fulgence Ouedraogo was one of the three Frenchmen in the Montpellier team, the last survivor of the quartet of young stars who burst onto the scene more than a decade ago. Together with Louis Picamoles, Julien Thomas and Francois Trinh-Duc, Ouedraogo was one of Montpellier’s local lads who went on to play for France. Picamoles and Thomas are long gone, and Trinh-Duc will be joining Toulon next season.On the move: Francois Trinh-Duc is leaving Montpellier for Toulon this summer. Photo: Getty ImagesThe four came of age at just the right moment, becoming the beating lifeblood of a club determined to go places. They literally did in 2007, upgrading from the small and ramshackle Stade Sabathé to the swanky new Stade Yves-du-Manoir. They also went from being one of the Top 14 also-rans to a major player, reaching their first final in 2011.They lost to Toulouse, a match that in hindsight was heavy with symbolism. The sun was beginning to set on Toulouse’s empire in 2011, while Montpellier were at the dawn of theirs. The month before the 2011 final Mohed Altrad, who made his millions through his eponymous construction company, became the principal stakeholder in the club. Five years on and the empire that Altrad has overseen is starting to take shape.Altrad, who renamed the Stade Yves-du-Manoir after himself, recruited Jake White at the start of last year. The pair are cut from the same cloth. Realists not romantics. “I didn’t get into rugby to be famous,” Altrad said in an interview last week. “But to seek a visibility for the Altrad Group, the principal sponsor.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS He’s got the visibility, all right, but popularity remains some way off.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.center_img We are the champions! Montpellier lift the 2016 European Challenge Cup. Photo: Getty Images Montpellier’s multinational team may have lifted the European Champions Cup but they’re struggling to win over the hearts of the Frenchlast_img read more

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Six Nations: Italy 7-33 Wales

first_imgTries: J Davies, L Williams, North. Cons: Halfpenny 3. Pens: Halfpenny 4.Follow me: Alun Wyn Jones produced a typically powerful performance (Huw Evans Agency)For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here. The good and the indifferent from Rome, where Wales came from behind at half-time to record an emphatic Six Nations win over Italy Scotland shocked the Irish, France put the wind up the English. Italy, however, were unable to keep the surprises going on the opening weekend of the RBS 6 Nations as they subsided after half-time, conceding 30 points in 40 minutes to a Welsh team that finished in confident and free-flowing mood.Rob Howley’s men thus chalked up a fourth successive win and lead the table after round one, but how will they reflect on a match that threatened to turn into a Roman ruin? Here’s a look at the good and the bad from the Stadio Olimpico…WHAT’S HOTSam Davies – The clamour for Davies to start against England next weekend has already started, and it’s a little unfair on Dan Biggar, whose accurate cross-kicks to wings George North and Liam Williams helped negate the Italians’ early speed.Biggar played the greasy conditions well but Davies, who came on at half-time after Biggar’s rib injury, showed a greater capacity for getting his back-line moving and had a hand in all three Welsh tries.Tangle of limbs: Sam Davies and Sergio Parisse compete for a high ball in Rome (Getty Images)Scott Williams also played beautifully, his skill at committing a man evident in the tries by Jonathan Davies and Liam Williams that broke the Azzurri’s resistance just past the hour mark. Calls for Biggar and Davies to form a new 10-12 axis should be ignored while Williams is delivering as he did today.Innovation – Nothing could match Alex Dunbar’s lineout try for invention this weekend but Italy’s first-half score by Edoardo Gori ran it close.Sergio Parisse’s delicious inside pass to Braam Steyn off a scrum created the momentum for a mini maul near the sticks, Gori being forced over by a clutch of surging Italian forwards. It was Italy’s high point.First blood: Italy players celebrate Edoardo Gori’s try that stemmed from a mini maul (Getty Images)Bonus points – Let’s hear it for the new points system. Wales only scored their second try with 13 minutes remaining, but in the closing stages they lifted the intensity because they knew a bonus point ­– for scoring four tries – was still within reach.George North’s fine finish left Wales three or so minutes to snatch the bonus and they so nearly achieved it, Liam Williams spilling the ball in the final play as he reached for the line.Would we have seen such a hectic finish without the new system being in place? Unlikely.Wonder wing: George North en route to his fifth try in five Six Nations matches (Getty Images)WHAT’S NOTMuddled thinking – Can someone explain the logic in Leigh Halfpenny going for goal from 48 metres – with difficult underfoot conditions – but then not going for goal from far easier positions later in the first half? This when the game was still scoreless.In electing to kick for the corner, Wales appeared to be thinking in terms of a bonus point for four tries from the off, but you adopt such a stance at your peril.‘Build a score’ is one of rugby’s more powerful truisms and by failing to register points, in a half when they had 73% possession and 78% territory, Wales allowed Italy to believe.Sergio Parisse – Everyone loves eulogising about the Italy captain, and rightly so because he continues to provide world-class performances in a team ranked only 13th in the globe. Some of his touches were magnificent but he needs to control his temper.Referee JP Doyle was obliged to give him a stern ticking-off for dissent after 65 minutes, after Parisse felt a lineout call went against his team unfairly, and for a moment we thought he might replicate his red-card dismissal for abusing a referee four years ago in a club match for Stade Francais. Clincher: Liam Williams celebrates his try with Rhys Webb and Sam Davies (Huw Evans Agency) center_img Parisse’s indiscipline is setting a poor example to his team, which leads to another flaw…Indiscipline – By the time Andrea Lovotti was dispatched to the sin-bin around the 70-minute mark, Italy had conceded 15 penalties – two more than in any of their Six Nations matches last year.Everyone wants to see a competitive Italy team but it’s not going to happen with so many daft indiscretions.Impressive: Leigh Halfpenny punishes Italian indiscipline, the full-back tallying 18 points (Getty)If we’re generous, we might say the ruck offence that allowed Halfpenny to make it 7-6 was unfortunate, but in the blink of an eye there followed a tip tackle by Steyn (7-9) and a ridiculous offside from a breakdown miles away from their line (7-12).From leading at the break, Italy forfeited their advantage and the whole momentum of the game shifted. Wales scored 14 points while Lovotti was absent and an afternoon of such promise for Italy was washed away by a fusillade of whistles.STATISTICS25 – Tackles made by Italy flanker Maxime Mbanda. Nothing wrong with Italy’s desire, they gave it their all9 – Offloads made by Wales, against three by Italy. Alun Wyn Jones (14 carries) led the forward charge at the start of the second half and Wales looked twice the team once they started to play with freedom100% – Wales achieved a perfect 13 out of 13 in the lineout, with Ken Owens meeting his usual high standards throwing in5 – Number of successive Six Nations matches in which George North has scored a try, after his five-pointers against Scotland, France, England and Italy last year4 – Jonathan Davies’s converted try brought up a Welsh milestone – they became the fourth team after England, Ireland and France to score 2,000 Six Nations points since the championship began 17 years agoItaly: E Padovani (C Canna 73); G Bisegni (S Panico 59-70), T Benvenuti (M Campagnaro 52), L McLean, G Venditti; C Canna ( T Allan 68), E Gori; A Lovotti, O Gega (L Ghiraldini 46), L Cittadini (P Ceccarelli 58), M Fuser (J Furno 34-40, F Minto 62), G Biagi (J Furno 52), A Steyn, M Mbanda, S Parisse (capt).Try: Gori. Con: Canna.Sin-bin: Lovotti 59min.Wales: L Halfpenny; G North, J Davies, S Williams (J Roberts 73), L Williams; D Biggar (S Davies HT), R Webb (G Davies 73); N Smith (R Evans 49), K Owens (S Baldwin 68), S Lee (T Francis 49), J Ball (C Hill 62), A Wyn Jones (capt, C Hill 4-15), S Warburton, J Tipuric, R Moriarty (J King). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Wales Team to face Scotland in the opening round of the Six Nations

first_img Wales Team to face ScotlandWales have announced their side to face Scotland in Cardiff this weekend, with the standout name being uncapped winger Josh Adams. He has been lighting up the back-line for the Worcester Warriors this season, scoring 13 tries in all competitions, and his form has been rewarded by head coach Warren Gatland. The Kiwi coach said: “We have been watching Josh closely. He is top try-scorer in the English Premiership and has been going well and we are excited for him.”Young Talent: Josh Adams has been playing brilliantly for WorcesterAdams may feel like the odd one out though, because every other back-line spot is taken by a Scarlet. The full-back spot, in the midst of intense competition, has been retained by Leigh Halfpenny, who has a point to prove in 2018, while Steff Evans takes the other wing spot. Having only played a couple of times since October, there is no room for George North.Point to prove: Halfpenny has retained his full-back spot but he must perform to keep itWith the injury to Rhys Webb, as expected Gareth Davies has taken the scrum-half jersey. The No 10 role was more of a headache for Gatland. Rhys Patchell and Gareth Anscombe were in competition but the Scarlet is reunited with Davies. Gatland said: “Both Rhys and Gareth have been training really well over the last couple of weeks. It was a tough call between them. Rhys has started most of his games for the Scarlets at ten. We are really happy with his form and the combination with Gareth at nine.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Hadleigh Parkes and Scott Williams continue their partnership for the second time, after the pair combined for the first time against South Africa in the final autumn Test of 2017.Scarlet Fever: Gatland has rewarded the play of Scarlet Rhys PatchellThe Scarlets also dominate the front row, with Rob Evans, Ken Owens and Samson Lee taking the three spots. Cory Hill partners captain Alun Wyn Jones in the second row, and Aaron Shingler, Josh Navidi and Ross Moriarty take the back-row positions. Navidi, in particular, will be thrilled to get the nod ahead of the experienced Justin Tipuric and the in-form Scarlet James Davies. Warren Gatland has named his side to kick off the 2018 Six Nations against Scotland this weekend WALES TEAM TO PLAY SCOTLAND (SATURDAY FEBRUARY 3, KO 14.15)Leigh Halfpenny (Scarlets) (74 Caps)Josh Adams (Worcester) (Uncapped)Scott Williams (Scarlets) (51 Caps)Hadleigh Parkes (Scarlets) (1 Cap)Steff Evans (Scarlets) (5 Caps)Rhys Patchell (Scarlets) (5 Caps)Gareth Davies (Scarlets) (27 Caps)Rob Evans (Scarlets) (20 Caps)Ken Owens (Scarlets) (52 Caps)Samson Lee (Scarlets) (34 Caps)Cory Hill (Dragons) (10 Caps)Alun Wyn Jones (Ospreys) (113 Caps) CAPTAaron Shingler (Scarlets) (13 Caps)Josh Navidi (Cardiff Blues) (7 Caps)Ross Moriarty (Gloucester) (17 Caps)Replacements:Elliot Dee (Dragons) (2 Caps)Wyn Jones (Scarlets) (5 Caps)Tomas Francis (Exeter Chiefs) (26 Caps)Bradley Davies (Ospreys) (57 Caps)Justin Tipuric (Ospreys)  (52 Caps)Aled Davies (Scarlets) (5 Caps)Gareth Anscombe (Cardiff Blues) (11 Caps)Owen Watkin (Ospreys) (2 Caps)last_img read more

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The power of Pentecost

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: This piece was first published in Faith & Leadership.I’ve always loved Pentecost, the day when language barriers fall and Christians rejoice that the gospel of Jesus Christ is the same in every tongue. In part, this affection comes from growing up bilingual near Montreal, moving constantly between two linguistic worlds.Perhaps nothing epitomized that unceasing back and forth more than my family’s two newspaper subscriptions. Every day, my Scottish immigrant mother read The Gazette, and my French-speaking father, La Presse. As my parents finished their respective papers, they handed them, section by section, to me.At the time — the turbulent 1970s and ’80s — majority-francophone Quebec was debating whether to remain a Canadian province or break away to form an independent republic. Reading the daily news from two perspectives, I could see the danger of being aligned too closely with any political authority that could rise or fall overnight.From the time I started school and learned “O Canada” in both official languages, I knew that earthly power was always contested, overtly or discreetly. Although national anthems are intended to unite citizens, I was surprised to discover that English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians sing completely different songs to the same tune.The English version celebrates “the true North strong and free” (from American domination), while the French lyrics laud the Roman Catholic faith for sustaining our ancestors after Great Britain conquered New France in 1760.My parents never dwelled on that amusing difference or the deadly serious political debates that swirled around us. Instead, they reassured me that our family could live peacefully as citizens of either a united Canada or an independent Quebec, and they ensured that I would have the linguistic skills to build relationships across their two cultures.When I joined the church as an adult, I found that my parents’ suspicion of earthly power had prepared me well for life as a Christian. I could readily affirm the gospel claim that the true citizenship of Christ’s disciples is in God’s kingdom, to which every other loyalty — to country, culture or clan — is subordinate. In a world where powers and principalities seek to pit one group against another, our only hope of living into our divine citizenship is the unsettling and sustaining power of the Holy Spirit.That is the power we celebrate on Pentecost. When we recite our multilingual liturgies, we evoke that long-ago day in Jerusalem when citizens of Rome and subjects of its territories, Jews born to the faith and new converts, all understood the apostles’ message without a human interpreter.Multilingual Pentecost services always gladden my heart and remind me of home. But they also make me wonder, what are churches doing the rest of the year to break down cultural barriers? Often, the answer is very little. Even when we try, we typically approach the issues in ways that ignore the power dynamics at work among us, relics of the idolatries of race, culture and nation.It happens with the best of intentions. A white church in a small town wants its black counterpart down the street to “end segregation” by closing its doors and joining the white church — because, after all, “our building is bigger.” Or the exhausted African-American or Latino parishioner is asked to serve on every committee, no matter what his or her particular gifts for ministry might be, because “we need a minority perspective.” Anyone will do.These examples, both unfortunately real, make me wince. They make me wonder, what invitations from the Holy Spirit am I missing in my ignorance or declining in my arrogance?The biblical witness tells me the Spirit sends them: invitations to listen for truths spoken in an unfamiliar accent, to sing a familiar song to a new melody, to hear a Bible story narrated from a perspective I’d rather ignore because it threatens my understanding of the world.God offers these invitations not because the church is one more diversity program to be tweaked according to the latest census data but because the messianic age has come. The reign of Babel has ended, and Jesus Christ’s followers are called to proclaim that reality.Possibilities for proclamation abound wherever creative, faithful witnesses are open to the Spirit’s prompting. When I lived in Louisville, Ky., a white Presbyterian pastor in town told me about a partnership he had started in the 1990s between his congregation and a much larger neighboring African-American church.“I approached a church that was twice the size of ours, with a far better choir, because I didn’t want our folks to have any excuse to harbor delusions of superiority,” the pastor told me.Grounded in such canny humility, a relationship between the two churches took root and thrived. They exchanged preachers and choirs, co-hosted picnics and studied Scripture together.One particular practice, however, was designed to make discussions of power inevitable. Every week, one pair from each church would visit the local courthouse together to observe criminal proceedings. The four sat with each other, taking notes about what they saw.Afterward, they discussed their observations over lunch and prayed together for everyone they had watched in the courtroom that day — victims, defendants and their families, prosecutors and defense attorneys, judges and court employees. Every day, they witnessed the disproportionate impact on black Americans of the stricter drug laws and mandatory minimum sentences that were then taking effect.Over time, as their trust in one another deepened, their discussions grew richer. Soon, they were praying together for guidance about how else to embody God’s healing love in a city that desperately needed it.Who knows where such projects might lead? If we believe the promise of Pentecost, then perhaps nothing less than “turning the world upside down” (Acts 17:6). As our first-century ancestors discovered, we can expect resistance if we start down that road — from the civil authorities, maybe from the church, and certainly, from time to time, from our own fearful hearts.But what alternative do we have if we are to be citizens of the kingdom? Try to confine the power of Pentecost to one day a year? Turn our sanctuaries into tombs, seeking to seal the Spirit inside? We know what God does when human beings try that.God offers us resurrection and new life. Or, as we say in Montreal, Il nous offre la résurrection et une nouvelle vie.The same gifts, through the same power, in any language.— The Rev. Rhonda Mawhood Lee is associate rector of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Durham, N.C., and an independent scholar and a spiritual director. A bicultural native of Montreal, she has lived in the United States since 1992. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs By Rhonda Mawhood LeePosted May 29, 2012 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Susan Butler says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (1) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The power of Pentecost TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 30, 2012 at 8:01 am Thank you very much for the image of the court house observers reflecting together. Going out together with the purpose of bringing God’s justice and compassion cements the unity we have as Christians and lets our differences bring richness the prayer and action we undertake together. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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Archbishop on the Communion’s challenges and the way forward

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Harry W Shipps says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Canterbury Christopher Epting says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Leila DIAB says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Posted Nov 17, 2014 November 17, 2014 at 4:33 pm We indeed have a man for the times and for this moment in history in our Archbishop Justin Welby.“Hear what the Spirit is saying to the church. Amen” Emily Wren says: Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby addresses the Church of England’s General Synod, meeting in London. Photo: Church of England[Lambeth Palace] In his presidential address to the General Synod on Nov. 17, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby spoke about the issues faced by the Anglican Communion and possible ways forward.Read the full text of the address below:During the last eighteen months or so I have had the opportunity to visit thirty-six other Primates of the Anglican Communion at various points. This has involved a total of 14 trips lasting 96 days in all. I incidentally calculated that it involves more than eleven days actually sitting in aeroplanes. This seemed to be a good moment therefore to speak a little about the state of the Communion and to look honestly at some of the issues that are faced and the possible ways forward.A Flourishing CommunionFirst of all, and this needs to be heard very clearly, the Anglican Communion exists and is flourishing in roughly 165 countries. There has been comment over the last year that issues around the Communion should not trouble us in the Church of England because the Communion has for all practical purposes ceased to exist. Not only does it exist, but almost everywhere (there are some exceptions) the links to the See of Canterbury, notwithstanding its Archbishop, are profoundly valued.  The question as to its existence is therefore about what it will look like in the future.   That may be very different, and I will come back to the question.Secondly, Anglicanism is incredibly diverse. To sit, in the space of a few months, in meetings with the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the Primate of Australia, the Primate of South Africa, the Moderator of the Church of South India, the Primate of Nigeria and many others is to come away utterly daunted by the differences that exist.  They are huge, beyond capacity to deal with adequately in the time for this presentation.  Within the Communion there are perhaps more than 2,000 languages and perhaps more than 500 distinct cultures and ways of looking at the world.  Some of its churches sit in the middle of what are literally the richest parts of the globe, and have within them some of the richest people on earth.  The vast majority are poor. Despite appearances here, we are a poor church for the poor. Many are in countries where change is at a rate that we cannot even begin to imagine.  I think of the man I met in Papua New Guinea who is a civil engineer and whose grandfather was the first of his tribe to see a wheel as a small aircraft landed in a clearing in the forest.At the same time there is a profound unity in many ways. Not in all ways, but having said what I have about diversity, which includes diversity on all sorts of matters including sexuality, marriage and its nature, the use of money, the relations between men and women, the environment, war and peace, distribution of wealth and food, and a million other things, underpinning us is a unity imposed by the Spirit of God on those who name Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour. This diversity is both gift and challenge, to be accepted and embraced, as we seek to witness in truth and love to the good news of Jesus Christ.Thirdly, the potential of the Communion under God is beyond anything we can imagine or think about. We need to hold on to that, there is a prize, the quest for which it is worth almost anything to achieve. The prize is visible unity in Christ despite functional diversity.  It is a prize that is not only of infinite value, but also requires enormous sacrifice and struggle to achieve.  Yet if we even get near it we can speak with authority to a world where over the last year we have seen more than ever an incapacity to deal with difference, and a desire to oversimplify the complex and diverse nature of human existence for no better reason than we cannot manage difference and dealing with The Other. Yet in Christ we are held together.  In Christ the barriers are broken, peace is held out to us as a gift established, which needs living. In Christ there is hope of a life that provides hope of peace.Fourthly, the Communion is extremely active. Let me give you a few examples. In Mexico, a small community abandoned by all, of people who had lost their homes and were living in the bad lands, where a priest (otherwise unoccupied apart from a full-time career in a professional area and running another church, as well as being unpaid) was sent by his bishop, to start a church, something he thought might well cost him his life. But there he went, to the poorest of the poor, and a community has been established with numerous baptisms, growing spirituality and a love and concern and compassion for one another that speaks of the living presence of Jesus among them.Another example, a conference in Oklahoma City, in which from people around The Episcopal Church, with patience and courtesy to one another, there was discussion over the issues around the use of firearms and the meaning of the Second Amendment, the right to bear arms, in practice in the modern-day USA.The South Sudan, and after a day spent burying the dead of a great massacre, the Archbishop stood up with extraordinary courage and called for reconciliation.  Those from the rebel group would already have opposed him, those from his own group would not necessarily have been impressed. To do that puts any of our struggles into a real perspective.In England a church in the middle of an extraordinarily mixed area of religious faith, faithful to the Gospel of Jesus Christ, active in its worship, lively in its preaching, yet being the centre and focus of religious leadership in the area so as to enable difference to be handled well.There are so many others that merit a presentation of its own.We live in a community that exists, that is deeply engaged with its world almost everywhere, that is diverse and argumentative and fractured, but yet shows in so many places both known and unknown the power and love of Christ through His Spirit at work in our world. We live in a Communion which merits celebration and thanksgiving as well as prayer and repentance.A flourishing Communion but also a divided Communion.I do not want to sound triumphalist. There are enormous problems. We have deep divisions in many areas, not only sexuality. There are areas of corruption, other areas where the power of the surrounding culture seems to overwhelm almost everyone at one point or another.Our divisions may be too much to manage.In many parts of the Communion, including here, there is a belief that opponents are either faithless to the tradition, or by contrast that they are cruel, judgemental, inhuman. I have to say that we are in a state so delicate that without prayer and repentance, it is hard to see how we can avoid some serious fractures.In an age of near instant communication, because the Communion exists, and is full of life, vigour and growth, of faith and trust in Jesus Christ, and love for him, everything that one Province does echoes around the world. Every sermon or speech here is heard within minutes and analysed half to death. Every careless phrase in an interview is seen as a considered policy statement. And what is true of all Provinces is ten times more so for us, and especially us in this Synod. We never speak only to each other, and the weight of that responsibility, if we love each other and the world  as we should, must affect our actions and our words.A Communion under threatThere is persecution in the Communion, in many, many areas. We are a poor, and a persecuted Church.We are well aware of that and need to remember it constantly. In very many parts of the world, particularly parts of Africa and the Middle East, but also South East Asia, persecution comes from jihadist attacks which have killed many, many Anglicans, other Christians and in largest number Muslims, over the last few years. Not a day goes by without some report being received of the suffering and persecution of churches around the world, and of cries for help and requests for support. Not a day goes by without something which should break one’s heart at the courage and the difficulties involved.There is immense suffering in the Communion. The terrible spread of Ebola, indescribable, a Black Death sweeping through three Dioceses of West Africa, is by itself a catastrophe of historic proportions. I was briefed on it two weeks ago in Accra, and the suffering of people in the afflicted countries makes the blood run cold. We must help, pray and call for more help.In the South Sudan the human created food shortage threatens to turn into a terrible famine. In DRC the war continues with the utmost cruelty, usually including rape.The list could go on and on, especially in the Middle East, Palestine and Israel, the Levant and the Euphrates valley.Where do we go?So what do we do? Where does this extraordinary, fractious, diverse, argumentative, wonderful, united, ferocious, peaceful, persecuted, suffering  body that is the Communion go, and what is the impact on us here in the Church of England?First, as I have said nothing we say is heard only by us.Secondly, we should rejoice in being part of this monumental challenge, of this great quest for the prize of being a people who can hold unity in diversity and love in difference.  It is almost unimaginably difficult, and most certainly cannot be done except with a whole-hearted openness to the Holy Spirit at work amongst us. It comes with prayer, and us growing closer to God in Jesus Christ and nothing else is an effective substitute. There are no strategies and no plans beyond prayer and obedience.Thirdly, the future of the Communion requires sacrifice.  The biggest sacrifice is that we cannot only work with those we like, and hang out with those whose views are also ours.  Groups of like-minded individuals meeting to support and encourage each other may be necessary, indeed often are very necessary, but they are never sufficient.  Sufficiency is in loving those with whom we disagree.  What may be necessary in the way of party politics, is not sufficient in what might be called the polity of the Church.In this Church of England we must learn to hold in the right order our calling to be one and our calling to advance our own particular position and seek our own particular views to prevail in the Church generally, whether in England or around the world. We must speak the truth in love.In practice that has to mean the discipline of meeting with those with whom we disagree and listening to each other carefully and lovingly. It means doing that as much as when we meet with those with whom we do agree, whether it is during sessions of General Synod or at other times. It means celebrating our salvation together and praying together to the God who is the sole source of our hope and future, together. It means that even when we feel a group is beyond the pale for its doctrine, or for its language about others or us, we must love. Love one another, love your neighbour, love your enemy. Who in the world is in none of those categories?All of us prefer being with those whose tradition we know and in which we were brought up. I am as much part of that as anyone else here. But I have gained far more in my own walk with Jesus Christ through being willing to meet with others whose traditions I did not find sympathetic, and be as transparent with them as I am with my closest friends, as from anything else that I have ever done.And for the future of the Communion? I have not called a Primates’ Meeting on my own authority (although I could) because I feel that it is necessary for the Anglican Communion to develop a collegial model of leadership, as much as it is necessary in the Church of England, and I have therefore waited for the end of the visits to Provinces.If the majority view of the Primates is that such a meeting would be a good thing, one will be called in response.  The agenda for that meeting will not be set centrally, but from around the Primates of the Communion.  One issue that needs to be decided on, ideally by the Primates’ meeting, is whether and if so when there is another Lambeth Conference.  It is certainly achievable, but the decision is better made together carefully, than in haste to meet an artificial deadline of a year ending in 8. A Lambeth Conference is so expensive and so complex that we have to be sure that it is worthwhile. It will not be imposed, but part of a collective decision.The key general point to be established is how the Anglican Communion is led, and what its vision is in the 21st century, in a post-colonial world? How do we reflect the fact that the majority of its members are in the Global South, what is the role of the Instruments of Communion, especially the Archbishop of Canterbury, and what does that look like in lived out practice?  These are great decisions, that must be taken to support the ongoing and uninterrupted work of ministering to a world in great need and in great conflict. Whatever the answer, it is likely to be very different from the past.So, the good news. The Communion exists and is doing wonderful things. The bad news.  There are great divisions and threats. The challenge. There is a prize of being able to develop unity in diversity and also with deeper and deeper ecumenical relations demonstrating the power of Christ to break down barriers and to provide hope for a broken world. We must grasp that challenge, it is the prize of a world seeing Christ loved and obeyed in His church, a world hearing the news of his salvation. So let us here, in the Church of England and above all in its General Synod, be amongst those who take a lead in our sacrificial, truthful and committed love for the sake of Christ for His mission in His world. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (12) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Jeremy Bates says: Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events PJ Cabbiness says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel David Benedict says: November 21, 2014 at 6:29 pm “Thirdly, the future of the Communion requires sacrifice. The biggest sacrifice is that we cannot only work with those we like, and hang out with those whose views are also ours…. What may be necessary in the way of party politics, is not sufficient in what might be called the polity of the Church.”Come now, Archbishop. There is no such thing as a worldwide Anglican Church. So do not speak as if there is. Nor should there be. The Anglican Communion is a family of independent churches. And if you try to make it anything more — if you try to establish a worldwide Anglican polity — then you will go too far. And on a fool’s errand, to boot.A lot of us Episcopalians will remember, for very many years to come, that with the Anglican Covenant, your predecessor sought to throw us, and Canada too, under a bus driven by the majority of the Communion.So we are very mistrustful of any effort to centralize power in any sort of London-based structure, no matter how it is administered.The Episcopal Church is autonomous. We are not going to sacrifice that autonomy. It just proved the salvation not only of our church but also of the dignity that we seek to respect in every human being. Comments are closed. November 17, 2014 at 10:37 pm Thank you, Archbishop. Very well said. The glory of our Anglicanism must be exactly what you say, we must stay together in unity through diversity. The energy to do that is through grace and the Holy Spirit. It is up to us to respond to that grace and Spirit, incorporate that energy into our lives and not be afraid to step out and meet the other in the midst of our differences. Jesus calls us to build up the Beloved Community together. Martin Luther King described the Beloved Community as one of redemption and reconciliation. Jesus desires it. Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska November 17, 2014 at 5:05 pm I think the Archbishop has shown very well where our prayers and actions are needed. Thanks you all those who struggle. Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Mark P. Fisher says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Selena Smith says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img November 17, 2014 at 4:13 pm Well stated, Justin. (I do wish he had mentioned the ACC since it too is one of the “instruments of Communion.) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books November 18, 2014 at 12:05 pm Thank you for this wonderful remark. It is very encouraging. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York December 1, 2014 at 7:53 pm Jeremy Bates speaks with as much wisdom as does the Archbishop, I think. While Jeremy Bates writes that “a lot of us Episcopalians will remember, . . . sought to throw us, and Canada too, under a bus . . .” that is what the Episcopal Church has done to many of its bishops, other clergy and laity, who have been picked up by others. They also will remember the use of that implemented centralized power by the Episcopal Church. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Dennis Delman says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL November 17, 2014 at 4:25 pm Thank you Archbishop for giving us the much needed and unbiased ‘big picture’. Your overview is both encouraging and challenging.+HarrySavannah, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Archbishop on the Communion’s challenges and the way forward Owen Hoskin says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Richard W. Murphy says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ November 18, 2014 at 3:38 pm Thank you for your honest appraisal of the Anglican Communion. I agree with the comment that the ACC – the most representative of the four “instruments” – needs not only to be mentioned, but to beequal participants in decions about the Communion’s future. November 17, 2014 at 8:51 pm Beautiful and heartfelt article. As all parents worry about and work to keep their different children – siblings – together in one family so too does the church worry and work to keep its different children in Christ together and loving one another. I do not find the differences to be so difficult as the anxiety over those differences. In that is a commonality that can be nurtured. Compassion is a desire to unite at the point of differences. Love is ignoring differences which facilitates unity. To find Christ in each other we need to stop defining each other by our material circumstances and see past the catagories and classifications. We are more than the sum of our parts. We are the Holy Family of Christ. We all have the same last name. November 25, 2014 at 12:38 pm Well thought out and well presented by the Archbishop. Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN November 17, 2014 at 9:32 pm I would bet that such an honest, thoughtful, and yet exploratory assessment of the state of the church could be similarly expressed by many communions in Christendom, further extending the universal unity Christians have in an incredible diversity. Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

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England: Christians urged to ‘build generous forward looking country’

first_img By Gavin DrakePosted Jul 8, 2016 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR PJ Cabbiness says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET England: Christians urged to ‘build generous forward looking country’ Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Anglican Communion News Service] The Church of England’s General Synod on the evening of July 8 called on all members of the church to “play their part” in the “common task of building a generous and forward looking country.” The call came following an emergency debate on a motion added to the synod’s agenda by the archbishops of Canterbury and York in response to the recent referendum in which the U.K. voted to leave the European Union.“It is perfectly clear that the result and the referendum campaign exposed deep divisions in our society, of which we were aware already,” Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said. “They are especially complex because they are divisions, in part, about our identity as a nation, whether in England or other parts of the U.K. And identity is always more difficult to deal with than issue-driven politics…“The result has released a latent racism and xenophobia in all sectors, and challenges the prevailing consensus of tolerance and acceptance, thus threatening other areas of welcome liberalization. And … we are going to face a period of profound uncertainty.”The archbishop said that tackling inequality in the U.K. was essential to respond to the fears and anxieties that had arisen during the campaign. He said that an increase in child poverty was one of the signs that “inequality is growing in our land.”He added: “Greater equality seeks the common good, and opens opportunities for aspiration in all households. The shock of Brexit must be one that forces us into a juster and a fairer society, and a more equal one.”The archbishop called for a renewed commitment to education, public health, and housing; and “a forward foreign policy that is based in development and love for the poor, those caught in conflict and suffering around the world.”He concluded: “The outbursts of the last two weeks may pass, but the signal has been set at danger for our cohesion, and the church must respond with a fresh effort in integration.”The motion adopted by the synod commended “the work already carried out by the church in bringing communities together” and suggested that each diocese appoint “a champion … to assess what more the church could do and to make recommendations for creating stronger and more constructive links between local communities.”Click here to read the full text of Archbishop Welby’s speech AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Charles M Hawes says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Collierville, TN July 9, 2016 at 3:54 pm The C of E has already “missed the boat” on this one. Where it stands in today’s world on issues of gender, sex, and sexuality is firmly two feet planted in yesterday. Where it stands in relation to Church and State, even as it gives voice to My Lord Canterbury in a House of Lords (really?), is an embarrassment which puts the lie to its preaching citizenship in the Kingdom of God. July 9, 2016 at 9:31 pm Perhaps men and women were wiser “yesterday”. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Curate Diocese of Nebraska Anglican Communion Comments (2) Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MIlast_img read more

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Liturgical texts published for 2018 Week of Prayer for Christian…

first_imgLiturgical texts published for 2018 Week of Prayer for Christian Unity This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] The 2018 Week of Prayer for Christian Unity, which traditionally takes place in the northern hemisphere each January, has been prepared by the churches of the Caribbean.  The annual event usually takes place between the feast of St. Peter on Jan. 18 and the feast of St. Paul on Jan. 25. Some southern hemisphere countries hold the week on a different date to avoid January holidays.Read the entire article here. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Liturgy & Music Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Posted Nov 3, 2017 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Ecumenical & Interreligious, Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Rector Albany, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Jobs & Calls Anglican Communion, Rector Pittsburgh, PA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

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Martyred Ugandan archbishop honored in church’s new finance building

first_imgMartyred Ugandan archbishop honored in church’s new finance building Posted Feb 2, 2018 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing [Anglican Communion News Service] A new 16-story commercial office suite in the heart of Uganda’s financial district will carry the name of martyred Archbishop Janani Luwum.The building, to be known as Janani Luwum Church House, was first envisioned by Archbishop Luwum before he was murdered on the orders of Idi Amin in February 1977. The building, which is being constructed by the Church of Uganda with the support of the Kenyan-based Equity Bank, will provide an income stream to support the ministry of the province.Read the full article here. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Africa, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 center_img New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Knoxville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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Max Lucado apologizes for past comments on homosexuality after outrage…

first_img Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest “LGBTQ individuals and LGBTQ families must be respected and treated with love. They are beloved children of God because, they are made in the image and likeness of God,” Lucado’s letter says. “Over centuries, the church has harmed LGBTQ people and their families, just as the church has harmed people on issues of race, gender, divorce, addiction, and so many other things. We must do better to serve and love one another.”Lucado is a bestselling author of self-help books and the pastor of Oak Hills Church, a megachurch in San Antonio, Texas. His 22-minute sermon for the cathedral’s Feb. 7 livestreamed service focused on easing life’s anxieties by feeling the presence of the Holy Spirit. It did not include references to sexuality or same-sex marriage, but critics argued that the cathedral never should have granted him the privilege of preaching, given the harm caused by his past statements on homosexuality and the lack of evidence that he had disavowed them.“Deep pain was caused to the LGBTQ community by our invitation to Max Lucado to preach at the Cathedral last Sunday,” Kevin Eckstrom, the cathedral’s chief communications officer, told ENS by email. “We appreciate him acknowledging the pain his past remarks have caused, and we hope that he will find a way to truly listen to those who have been hurt by his words. For us, here as the Cathedral, we are now in the mode of listening to our community so we can do better going forward.” Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel By David PaulsenPosted Feb 11, 2021 Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL LGBTQ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls The Rev. Max Lucado, an evangelical pastor and bestselling author, preaches a prerecorded sermon for Washington National Cathedral’s Feb. 7 livestreamed worship service.[Episcopal News Service] The Rev. Max Lucado has apologized in a letter to Washington National Cathedral after his invitation to preach in a cathedral worship service sparked outrage over his past statements about homosexuality and same-sex marriage.Lucado, a popular evangelical author and pastor, said in the letter dated Feb. 11 that he still believes in “the traditional biblical understanding of marriage” but now regrets the words he used in a 2004 sermon and article. Critics have condemned his comparison of same-sex marriage to legalized polygamy, bestiality and incest and his suggestion that homosexuality is something that can be changed by pastoral care.“I now see that, in that sermon, I was disrespectful. I was hurtful. I wounded people in ways that were devastating,” Lucado said in his Feb. 11 letter, a copy of which was obtained by Episcopal News Service. “It grieves me that my words have hurt or been used to hurt the LGBTQ community. I apologize to you and I ask forgiveness of Christ.”Read the Rev. Max Lucado’s full letter here.Lucado’s apology comes a day after National Cathedral Dean Randy Hollerith and Washington Bishop Mariann Budde issued parallel apologies for inviting Lucado to preach by prerecorded video and then failing to heed calls to rescind the invitation after Lucado’s 2004 statements were condemned. Hollerith and Budde also said they would hold a listening session at 7 p.m. Feb. 21 to receive additional feedback from the LGBTQ community.ENS reached out to Lucado and his church several times late last week and early this week, seeking comment on whether his views on homosexuality have evolved. Church staff members said he was unavailable.His letter to the cathedral does not specify how much of what he said in 2004 he still believes. “Faithful people may disagree about what the Bible says about homosexuality, but we agree that God’s holy Word must never be used as a weapon to wound others,” he wrote in his apology letter. 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