Waiting for the Big One

first_imgIt has been hailed as perhaps the most important piece of employmentlegislation ever. So is HR quaking in its boots? By Phil BoucherTerry RobinsonHR director UK, EurotunnelWe don’t feel the information and consultation legislation will force us tomake big changes as we have always had a consultative framework in place. AsEurotunnel is Anglo-French, the internal consultation has basically mirroredthe situation in France, so we have had a works council in all but name sincethe company was created in 1994. Three years ago, Eurotunnel also created a European Works Council. This ismade up of eight representatives each from the UK and France. It meets twice ayear and basically supplements the UK company council which meets six times ayear. There are no limitations on the agenda within any of these, sorepresentatives are free to debate anything they wish between themselves. In the UK we already have the situation where a lot of our consultationoverlaps anyway. This is partly because of the 1999 Employment Relations Actand because we have formed a strong partnership with the T&G since 2000.The existing partnership mostly discusses pay and conditions, and there are nolimitations on what they can talk about. It meets six times a year to deal withcompany issues. Eurotunnel is also developing a plan to mix the T&G andworks council together so there is even wider consultation. The Act may bring a degree of rationalisation to this consultation, but itwill not change too much because the company is owned by shareholders and wealready have a fairly transparent approach to financial and company business.We are already far more open than the majority of UK firms as we are run in thesame way as a French company. The one worry that exists arises from the phrase “with a view toreaching an agreement”. This phrase could cause problems depending on howit is interpreted as we have always relied on traditional consultation. Likemost companies, we make a decision at board level, then pass the detailsthroughout the organisation to gain feedback. The board then decides whether itshould act on the feedback or not. If the phrase has teeth, it could well mean the company has to restructure –particularly as we might be obliged to leave important plans on hold whilepeople make their minds up. Other than this, I cannot see that the Act is goingto make radical changes to the way we consult or the degree of transparency wehave within the company. Jill CrowtherHead of HR practice, MicrosoftWe are waiting to see what furtheramendments will be made to the Act and are consulting with the CBI to preparefor it. We are worried that rigid formalisation of the communication processmay cause us to lose some of the engagement we have worked so hard to develop.Our global staff survey currently has a 93 per cent response rate, forinstance, and this may be adversely affected by any changes to the two-wayrelationship. In particular, we are concerned the legislation may force thecompany to take a step backwards. Our fear is that it may negatively affectcompanies that have been more progressive. Despite this, we think it isbrilliant for companies that haven’t placed such an emphasis on consultationbefore.Kate JopsonPrincipal consultant, KPMG people servicesWe have anticipated futuredevelopments by introducing an Employee Business Forum. We hope this will be amechanism for information and consultation and help promote employeeinvolvement in the business. It is composed of elected employee representativesand members of management, who attend regular meetings. To ensure everything isas transparent as possible, there are published agendas that employeescontribute to. The forum will be used for both formal and informal consultationand is designed to engage KPMG people in dialogue about relevant issues. Wehope it will focus attention on key issues for the firm, and create a way ofharnessing employees’ ideas and creativity, as well as promoting understandingof the business.Len AspellGroup head of employee relations, HSBCUntil the draft regulations arepublished, it is difficult to be precise about how they may apply to currentarrangements. We already have information and collective consultationprocedures in place for our management grades (a National Council Forum) andclerical staff grades (through a trade union) and do not know how these will beaffected. We also communicate directly with employees through various channels.It is important the regulations allow employers and employees the opportunityand flexibility to determine the most appropriate framework. We would beconcerned if the regulations dissuaded companies from direct communication withemployees and relied entirely on indirect communication through employeerepresentatives.Sue GriffinHead of employment relations, Ceridian CentrefileWe are in the process of changing ourpension scheme for people on defined benefits schemes and have electeddelegates to voice the opinions of those concerned. Ceridian also handles a lotof TUPE transfers and this involves a huge amount of consultation at both endsof the spectrum. We believe this will change slightly in the future becauseinstead of electing people for a specific purpose, we are likely to havepermanent elected representatives. Ideally, these people would hold theposition for between 2-3 years – it takes some time for them to get to gripswith everything that’s involved. But at the moment, nothing has been set out indefined terms as we are still waiting for the legislation to be finalised. Related posts:No related photos. Waiting for the Big OneOn 1 Jul 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more

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Postdoctoral Associate – Metabolic Engineering for Crop Improvement (62760)

first_imgIndividuals wishing to apply should go online to http://apply.interfolio.com/77321and submit:Cover letter that states applicant’s interest in the positionand qualifications relative to the credentials listed aboveCurriculum vitaeContact information (including email addresses) for 3individuals willing to serve as references The successful candidate will apply established transformation andCRISPR-Cas9 protocols to validate targets for crop improvement anddevelop multiplex genome editing and transgenic strategies formetabolic engineering. Characterization of genetically modifiedevents under controlled environment and field conditions will allowto select best performing events similar in scope to our earlierpublications.Selected publications related to this position:Parajuli, S., Kannan, B., Karan, R., Sanahuja, G., Liu, H.,Garcia‐Ruiz, E., Kumar, D., Singh, V., Zhao, H., Long, S.,Shanklin, J., Altpeter, F. 2020 (in press). Towards oilcane:Engineering hyperaccumulation of triacylglycerol into sugarcanestems. Global Change Biology – Bioenergy https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1111/gcbb.12684 Selected candidate will be required to provide an officialtranscript to the hiring department upon hire. A transcript willnot be considered “official” if a designation of “Issued toStudent” is visible. Degrees earned from an education institutionoutside of the United States are required to be evaluated by aprofessional credentialing service provider approved by National Association of CredentialEvaluation Services (NACES) .Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work in the US. TheUniversity of Florida is a public institution and subject to allrequirements under Florida Sunshine and Public Record laws.If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771 (TDD). Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to workin the US. Searches are conducted in accordance with Florida’sSunshine Law.#category=64The University of Florida is committed to non-discrimination withrespect to race, creed, color, religion, age, disability, sex,sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, marital status,national origin, political opinions or affiliations, geneticinformation and veteran status in all aspects of employmentincluding recruitment, hiring, promotions, transfers, discipline,terminations, wage and salary administration, benefits, andtraining. The Institute of Food andAgricultural Sciences is committed to creating an environmentthat affirms diversity across a variety of dimensions, includingability, class, ethnicity/race, gender identity and expression. Weparticularly welcome applicants who can contribute to such anenvironment through their scholarship, teaching, mentoring, andprofessional service. We strongly encourage historicallyunderrepresented groups to apply.If an accommodation due to a disability is needed to apply for thisposition, please call 352-392-2477 or the Florida Relay System at800-955-8771 (TDD) or visit Accessibility at UF .The Crop Biotechnology Research Program at University of Florida,headed by Fredy Altpeter ( http://agronomy.ifas.ufl.edu/faculty/fredy-altpeter/) is seeking a highly motivated postdoctoral research associatewith experience in modular assembly of recombinant DNA constructs,plant genetic engineering, molecular biology and project managementto join our team. The research program focuses on designing biomasscrops for enhanced productivity and production of value addedproducts using the “plants as factories” concept in collaborationwith the recently funded U.S. Department of Energy’s BioenergyResearch Center https://cabbi.bio/research/feedstocks-theme/ Altpeter F. et al. 2016. Advancing Crop Transformation in the Eraof Genome Editing. Plant Cell. 28: 1510-1520. http://www.plantcell.org/content/early/2016/06/22/tpc.16.00196.full.pdf+html Kannan, B., Jung, J.H., Moxley, G. W., Lee, S.‐M. Altpeter, F.2018. TALEN mediated targeted mutagenesis of more than 100COMT copies/alleles in highly polyploid sugarcane improvessaccharification efficiency without compromising biomass yield.Plant Biotechn. J. 16: 856–866. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pbi.12833/full Zale, J., J.H. Jung, J.Y. Kim, B, B. Patha, R. Karan, H. Liu, X.Chen, H. Wu, J. Candreva, Z. Zhai, J. Shanklin, F. Altpeter. 2016.Metabolic engineering of sugarcane to accumulate energy-densetriacylglycerols in vegetative biomass. Plant Biotech. J. 14:661-669. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/pbi.12411/epdf.A PhD. in plant molecular biology or related field is required.Extensive background in molecular genetics is essential, includingdesign and construction of multi-gene vectors using modular cloningplatforms like Golden Gate assembly, analysis of RNAseq data, planttissue culture, biolistic gene transfer, molecular and phenotypiccharacterization of transgenic plants under greenhouse and fieldenvironments and statistical analysis of data. Knowledge in plantmetabolism, physiology and genomic regulation is desirable. Thiswork requires excellent interpersonal and communication skills inEnglish as well as excellent writing skills as demonstrated by astrong publication record in peer reviewed journals. Recentgraduates are encouraged to apply.For full consideration, candidates should apply and submitadditional materials by August 6, 2020. The position will remainopen until a viable applicant pool is determined.last_img read more

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Oxford fall short at Twickenham

first_imgWith the first of four tries after only three minutes, two drop goals and a nail-bitingly close finish, the 126th Varsity Match was a highly entertaining game which, right until the final whistle, could have gone either way. In the end it was the resilience of the Light Blue forwards and staunch defending that gave Cambridge the edge, seeing them bash through to their 60th Varsity win. Just seconds after kick-off, Cambridge turned the ball over and a sharp offload from the tackle allowed them to gain momentum. When the Oxford winger Tom Tombleson was bundled into touch after gathering a kick, a 5m lineout put the Light Blues in a very strong attacking position with only 3 minutes on the clock. As had been predicted, the Cambridge pack kept it tight with a fierce drive for the line and Jon Dawson, former Harlequins and Wasps hooker, grounded the ball. A good strike from the Cambridge fly-half fell just short of the cross-bar. With a 5-point deficit after just 3 minutes, pre-match favourites Oxford would have to strike back fast to gain some momentum after conceding a soft try. When a great incisive run by their winger soon brought Cambridge up into Oxford’s half again, Oxford managed to settle themselves and turned the ball over. But a penalty against Oxford for offside allowed the Tabs to put 3 more points on the board. After the Dark Blues won a lineout, it was their captain, former Wallaby Joe Roff, who brought his team off the back foot in this, his last ever competitive game. Some silky running into the opposition’s 22m gave the Oxford forwards a chance to finally made their mark, grinding away to push closer to the line. The ball came out to McMahon in the pocket, who slotted a drop goal coolly between the posts to bring the Oxonians back into the game.The three points gave the Dark Blues the lift they needed, and after Cambridge’s Murray kicked the ball out on the full, Oxford demonstrated a solid attacking lineout. The ball was handled well through the backs and McMahon put Boto in space on a previously unexploited blindside. Cutting inside towards the line and stepping a missed interception by Cambridge’s Broadfoot, Boto offloaded to Chris Mahony who rolled with the tackle over the try line to sink the ball into the turf. McMahon’s conversion took Oxford into the lead 10-8 with ten minutes remaining in the first half. Unfortunately, Mahoney’s run also resulted in an ankle injury so Gregory came on at centre and Roff moved back to 15, a change that would have a significant impact on the game. Just minutes after Oxford’s first foray on the try line, Roff cut a line past Tombleson on the inside with space enough to see Dark Blue spectators jump to their feet in anticipation. However, fumbling the ball in what was surely a try-scoring opportunity, the half-time whistle blew with the score still at 10-8 to Oxford. After the break, Cowie and Davis replaced Rosen and Allusen in the front row. More kicking began the second half, with the ball flying back and forth as it had in the early stages of the match. Once again taking control, Roff tried an up-andunder which resulted in a penalty for Oxford. McMahon stepped up to the occasion to seal the three points, taking the score to 13-8. When an injury to Cambridge’s flyhalf forced a reorganisation in the Light Blue backs, Oxford seemed to have the run of play, with solid work from the pack keeping the momentum moving forward. Re-playing a tactic that had worked in the first half, McMahon dropped a second goal (the third player to do so in the history of the Varsity match) and propelled his team to an 8-point lead. Matthews then replaced Lutton to complete a new front row for the Dark Blues. Penalised for being off their feet, with 20 minutes left Oxford found themselves once more defending a 5m lineout. Like an action replay of the beginning of the match, the Cambridge forwards proved their strength, remaining on their feet to charge over the line. A successful conversion meant that the rivals were one point apart, and a bout of tussling after the whistle made the tension palpable. Reinvigorated by the score, Cambridge continued to use the strength of the rolling maul and made fast yards. After an impressive passage of play the ball was passed through the backs until a change of direction when the number 8 charged through Oxford’s defence to ground the ball once more. Duly converted, Oxford would need to respond quickly, with Cambridge in the lead 23-15 and the clock running down. Having had difficulty making a mark on the game since his move to full-back, Roff found himself knocked to the ground after a kick in an overzealous late tackle by his opposite number. Referee Tony Spreadbury awarded Oxford a penalty from where the ball landed, and it was the Dark Blues’ turn to attack the 5m lineout. However, there was miscommunication and messy ball, and unlike the Light Blue forwards, Oxford did not stay on their feet. The last five minutes of the match were played in the Cambridge half, tantalisingly close to the line, but Cambridge’s defence sessions with Wasps coach Saun Edwards seemed to have paid off. In their very last campaign for victory, with 50 seconds on the clock and the ball a metre from the line, the Oxford forwards bashed through player after player with dogged determination, fighting for inches. When the ball came out into the backs, players were lining up in space to score, but with no margin for error this was not Oxford’s day. The pass did not link up; the stadium erupted into a multitude of Light Blue cheers. Despite a significantly more successful season than their rivals, a captain with a World Cup win under his belt, and an 8-point lead after 50 minutes, for the third successive year Varsity victory has eluded the Oxford Blues. After the match the Oxford players were ready to commend Cambridge’s defensive effort in the final minutes of the game, which was by all accounts, outstanding. That the match was so close will surely be no consolation for the players, but for those watching it was testament to the prestige and competitive spirit of this unique fixture.by Stephanie Hardwicklast_img read more

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Robber targets Waterfields

first_imgWaterfields bakery staff fear they could be the next target of an armed robber, who has raided six of the company’s shops in the north west.The man has already struck at Clock Face, Sutton, Whiston, Rainhill and Allerton in the last few weeks and, in the last raid, forced the safe to be opened before locking two staff members and a delivery man in a room.The chain has 47 shops in the region. No-one was hurt in the incidents, but staff were left shaken and varying amounts of cash were stolen. Owner Richard Waterfield said: “We’ve no idea who this person is or why he is doing this there have been no dismissals or staff grievances that could be connected. We also trade in towns against Greggs and Greenhalgh’s, which have similar banking procedures.”The chain has introduced new security measures, including reducing the float in its shops.last_img read more

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Press release: UK calls on the international community to prioritise long-term support for the Rohingya people on the anniversary of the crisis

first_imgGet our latest press releases, free-to-use photos, embeddable videos and case studies online • Provides counselling for sexual violence survivors and makes sure the most vulnerable in the camps are protected from people traffickers; UK calls on the international community to prioritise long-term support for the Rohingya people on the anniversary of the crisisOne year on from the devastating man-made crisis which saw the mass exodus of 700,000 persecuted Rohingya men, women and children fleeing Burma to Bangladesh, the UK is calling on the international community to provide long-term support to keep the Rohingya people safe in the years to come, both in Bangladesh and in Burma.This time last year the watching world looked on at the scale and speed of this forced movement of people which triggered one of the largest international aid responses in 2017. The UK has been at the forefront of that response and has contributed £129 million to support the displaced Rohingya since 25 August 2017.The Government and people of Bangladesh have also shown enormous generosity in opening their borders and providing a safe haven for those fleeing violence.Now the focus is on making sure that the Rohingya people have access to further support while they are living in the camps. UK aid will provide immediate access to learning opportunities in a safe environment for Rohingya children and also local children living in communities near to the camps, as well as providing skills training to improve the livelihoods for Rohingya men and women, better equipping them for the future.International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt said:“The roots of this crisis go back decades, but 12 months ago we saw an unprecedented campaign of terror by the Burmese military, resulting in 700,000 people fleeing across the border into Bangladesh.“There is no doubt that this is a protracted crisis and the British public have enabled hundreds of thousands of lives to be saved through their taxes, and through huge sums raised in voluntary donations. I want to thank all who have stepped up and donated or worked to bring hope to so many.“It is clear what the international community must now do, and what Burma must do. These people need their lives back and their rights guaranteed.“On this anniversary of such barbarism we should recommit ourselves to ensuring that Burma cooperates with the asks of the international community and that nations work to meet to needs of these vulnerable people.”To date UK aid has provided life-saving food, water, shelter and medication to almost a million Rohingya who now live within the camps in Bangladesh.Our support: For breaking news, follow us on Twitter: @DFID_Press • Helps traumatised children be reunited with their parents; • Has helped build sturdy, protected shelters during the rainy season. The monsoon and cyclone season is expected to last until November and UK aid will ensure that 10,000 upgraded shelter kits, 90,000 tarpaulins and ropes, 100,000 blankets and 100,000 floor mats are accessible and can be immediately provided to those in need. The UK will continue to help all vulnerable communities remaining in Rakhine State, including 600,000 Rohingya. Our humanitarian work and support to education, nutrition, livelihoods and health are designed to address inequalities between different groups and promote progress on the recommendations put forward by the Kofi Annan led Rakhine Advisory Commission.We continue to press for the conditions to be put in place for the Rohingya to be able to return voluntarily, safely and with dignity to their homes. Such conditions do not yet exist and any returns process will take considerable time.UK aid, the crisis in twelve months:August: Reports of violence and cross border movements triggered our preparations for a rising number of arrivals in Bangladesh.September: The UK stepped up its existing assistance in the camps and provided £30 million in extra funding which helped to provide food, water and shelter for the new influx of people. In Burma, following the events of the 25 August 2017, DFID funded the distribution of clean water and food and the provision of healthcare services to affected communities.October: The Disaster Emergency Committee (DEC) launched its appeal. DFID announced it would match donations pound for pound up to £5million. In the same month we also pledged a further £12 million of humanitarian assistance at the landmark UN pledging conference.November: International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt visited the Cox’s Bazar camps where she witnessed first-hand how UK aid was having an impact on the ground. She also announced an additional £12 million in support for additional food and to increase access to psychosocial support and counselling for victims of sexual and gender based violence.December: Following the outbreak of diphtheria in the camps, the UK aid funded Emergency Medical Team (EMT), made up of the UK’s top medical professionals, was deployed in the days after Christmas to help stem the spread of this deadly disease.January: The BBC ran a full day of live radio and TV coverage from Cox’s Bazar and announced the UK was playing a significant role in halting the spread of diphtheria within the camps by vaccinating 350,000 children between the ages of six months and 15 years.February: After six weeks in the camps the EMT returned home having triaged more than 3,000 people and treated almost 500 people for diphtheria. Had it not been for British help, many people could have died. An important part of their legacy was training local Bangladeshi medical professionals in disease prevention.March: The International Development Committee visited the camps and witnessed how UK aid was saving lives.April: The Evening Standard reported on the number of babies that were due to be born in the midst of the monsoon and cyclone season. In an interview with the paper the International Development Secretary highlighted how more than 16,000 births were imminent and set out how UK aid was helping to train midwives.May: Ahead of the looming monsoon and cyclone season the UK announced continued support to the Rohingya people. The additional £70 million support package is destined to provide immediate support in the form of shelter, food and medication, and longer-term support in the form of livelihood opportunities.June: UK support helped with the important process of shelter preparations before the looming rains began. New shelters were built and existing shelters strengthened.July: A flurry of activity in this month saw the final repairs to roads and pathways in the camps. UK support provided to undertake this task will ensure that vital food, medicine and water can to get through into the camps if there is significant flooding. July also saw a meeting between the International Development Secretary and UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Cate Blanchett, where they discussed how UK aid is saving lives and what more needs to be done to ensure that the Rohingya people are cared for.Contact our Media Team: 020 7023 0600 (Overseas +44 20 7023 0600)last_img read more

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From Down Under – Doubling Down on OpenStack

first_imgDell EMC is excited about OpenStack Summit happening in Sydney. As Australia is known as the “Land Down Under”, I’d like to provide a peek under the covers of our OpenStack strategy.Since our last release and announcement of the Dell EMC Ready Bundle for Red Hat OpenStack Platform, Dell EMC has strengthened our OpenStack team to build scaled and hardened solutions for communications and cloud service providers. SP use-cases provide the right foundation to enable robust feature sets for large enterprise, higher education, and government workloads.Our OpenStack strategy is built around integrating physical and virtual infrastructure into platforms best able to address the complex technical and operational challenges facing the SP industry. These include IaaS, CaaS, SaaS, NFV and the increasing role that containers, bare metal and cloud native technologies play. Today, there are four areas I would like to provide updates on:Dell EMC NFV Ready Bundle for VMware with Integrated OpenStackDell EMC Ready Bundle for Red Hat OpenStack PlatformDell EMC NFV Ready Bundle for Red HatUpdate and Priorities for Dell EMC OpenStack SolutionsDell EMC NFV Ready Bundle for VMware with Integrated OpenStackIn September, at MWC Americas, Dell EMC announced the Dell EMC NFV Ready Bundle for VMware. This solution extended Dell EMC’s thought leadership and commitment to the Communications Service Provider (CSP) industry by enabling a fully-integrated platform of Dell EMC infrastructure with VMware vCloud NFV.Today, we have extended that platform to support VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) providing an option for SPs to capitalize on the accessibility of OpenStack by using the open APIs to integrate with VMware infrastructure. This carrier grade Ready Bundle provides a strong foundation for SPs to reduce time to service while offering multi-tenancy, dynamic scalability, high-availability, integrated containers support and In-Service-Software-Upgrade.Dell EMC Ready Bundle for Red Hat OpenStack PlatformAt the same time, we’re announcing an update to the Dell EMC Ready Bundle for Red Hat OpenStack Platform to enable support for the Dell PowerEdge 14th generation server family.Release 10.1 of the Ready Bundle supports the PowerEdge R640 and R740xd rack servers and runs Red Hat OpenStack Platform 10 and Red Hat Ceph Storage 2 software.  The PowerEdge 14th generation servers bring a scalable architecture, intelligent automation, and deeply integrated security, as well as increased performance and density for this Ready Bundle.This release includes the Dell EMC JetPack Automation Toolkit, which delivers rapid and reliable automated deployment and life-cycle management capabilities for OpenStack in less than half the time of current methods.More information can be found at dell.com/openstack and all technical documentation, including the Architecture Guides, can be found in the Dell EMC Tech Center community.Dell EMC NFV Ready Bundle for Red Hat In addition to the standard platform, Dell EMC introduces availability of our next Dell EMC NFV Ready Bundle for Red Hat which is a pre-integrated and pre-validated joint Dell EMC + Red Hat solution optimized to simplify and help CSPs accelerate production deployments of business critical virtualized network functions (VNF) and operationalization of NFV.This NFV Ready Bundle provides enhancements on the core platform to include deployment of NFV-specific enhancements in an automated fashion with JetPack. Such enhancements include NUMA pinning, SR-IOV, DPDK support, and Huge Pages – all capabilities that Virtual Network Function (VNF) providers rely on for delivery of their network workloads.Update and Priorities for Dell EMC OpenStack SolutionsGoing forward, Dell EMC has created a single organization to develop both the strategy and the solutions for OpenStack across our partners. As a result, we are better able to serve our customers and our partners (VMware, Red Hat, Canonical, SuSE and Mirantis) and markets. As an example, this team just delivered the Dell EMC Canonical Mitaka OpenStack Reference Architectures for PowerEdge and DSS 9000 rack scale infrastructure. Our core objective is to deliver a simplified and converged platform, continue investment in JetPack as a common automation layer, expanding the networking options available to include SDN, 25 Gigabit networking integrated with Dell EMC Open Networking, and create a comprehensive infrastructure assurance suite across the entire stack.Dell EMC is committed to OpenStack as a platform for multiple workloads, and will continue to invest to bring industry-leading OpenStack solutions that address our customers’ challenges to market. Be sure to visit Dell EMC at OpenStack Summit (Dev & Ops Lounge sponsored by Dell EMC on Level 4) and join many of the speaking engagements in which Dell EMC is participating:Mon 6, 2:00pm-2:10pm Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre – Level 2 – Parkside 2 Foyer Baremetal Server Management – Like Shooting Redfish in a Barrel Automated NFV Deployment and Management with TripleO Tue 7, 5:50pm-6:30pm Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre – Level 3 Convention Center – Cockle Bay Room 1Fast and secure Clear Containers on OpenStack. A winner! Wed 8, 3:30pm-4:10pm Sydney Convention and Exhibition Centre – Level 3 Convention Center – C3.6What’s Your Workflow?last_img read more

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Notre Dame Dublin program integrates service learning with study abroad experience

first_imgRosie McDowell, the director of international community-based learning outreach for the Center of Social Concerns (CSC), shared her research regarding the community engagement of Notre Dame students in Dublin on Tuesday morning at the Geddes Hall Coffee House. McDowell discussed how Notre Dame’s Dublin program integrates service learning with the study abroad experience.While students study at host universities like Trinity College and University College Dublin, McDowell said they also have the opportunity to become involved in the community.“Once in Dublin, the students are placed in a variety of social service organizations, serving at-risk youth in after school programs, young adult refugees, the elderly, those who are homeless and individuals with special needs,” McDowell said.McDowell said the idea behind this program is supported by research, particularly that of Robbin Crabtree, dean of the Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts at Loyola Marymount University.Crabtree’s research has shown that “service learning and study abroad get students out of their comfort zone and also get them the support they need to understand their experiences,” McDowell said.McDowell said the research of Barbara Parker additionally emphasizes how service learning can complement any study abroad program.“Students’ effective and cognitive content learning is impacted similarly by study abroad and service learning, but their connective learning, their personal road to development and solidarity to others is enhanced and more strongly impacted by service learning,” McDowell said, summarizing the findings of Parker’s research.Such an integrated program is of particular importance for students studying in Europe, McDowell said, because many Americans’ image of Europe is “composed of Disney representations.” This program provides students with a more realistic view of European life.“When a study abroad program is intentionally designed to give students opportunities to encounter the different facets of the community, the students contradict this imagined ideal that they carry with them,” she said.The service opportunities offered by the Dublin program confront students with the very real social issues present in Ireland, McDowell said.“They see firsthand the diversity of the immigrant families that are there and in need, the needs of the Irish homeless families, the growing need for after school programs for at-risk youth and the isolation of the elderly whose families may have all emigrated in search of better economic opportunity,” she said.“These encounters and engagements contrast greatly with the mythical, intoxicating images that students may have in mind on arrival,” McDowell said.For this reason, “adequate space is provided for unpacking these dissonances and contrasts” through reflection, she said.This reflection occurs in the form of six journals spread throughout the semester, McDowell said. These journals allow McDowell to see the effect this integrated study abroad and service-learning experience has on students.“Students gain insight into Irish culture and politics, they make comparisons between Ireland and the United States, they develop some compassion and understanding for those that they serve, and they reflect on the importance of developing relationships and understanding people through dialogue,” McDowell said. “They experience spiritual growth, they experience feelings of belonging, and they begin to think about their long term aspirations and how they might stay connected to the issue they worked on while they were there.”Tags: service learning, Trinity College, University College Dublinlast_img read more

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Frozen Duo Robert Lopez & Kristen Anderson-Lopez Tapped for Oscars

first_img View Comments The Oscar win for the Frozen megahit made The Book of Mormon and Avenue Q composer Lopez a member of the exclusive EGOT Club. Lopez and Anderson-Lopez are currently working on a new tuner, Up There. It’s time to see what they can do…for the Oscar ceremony! Frozen husband and wife songwriting team Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez, who won the Academy Award last year for “Let It Go,” will write a number for host Neil Patrick Harris. The 2015 Oscars will air on February 22. As previously reported, along with Harris and Lopez, mega-producers Craig Zadan and Neil Meron have tapped some of Broadway’s best for the show. Rob Ashford (Thoroughly Modern Millie) will choreograph, with production design by Derek McLane (33 Variations) and musical direction by Stephen Oremus (Kinky Boots, The Book of Mormon). “It won’t be a song called “Let It O” with a big giant Swarovski “O” crystal in the background,” joked Tony winner Harris in a video about the news. Does this mean there’ll be no Adele Dazeem either?last_img read more

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Good vs. bad

first_imgBiofilm forms protective coating”Over time, a biofilm, or slime layer, develops in the drains,”Doyle said. “This biofilm protects the listeria when cleaners andsanitizers are poured down the drains.”Knowing this, Doyle took a fight-fire-with-fire approach to killingthe drain-dwelling listeria. He uses the same technology hedeveloped for controlling E. coli and Salmonella.”We took samples of biofilm from floor drains in processing plantswhere there was a history of low levels to no listeria,” he said.With the help of the plant operators, biofilm samples were takenfrom dairy, poultry and infant food processing plants. Thescientists found nine different bacteria from biofilms that werehighly effective in competing with and killing listeria.”From these bacteria, we chose two strains that could grow withlisteria and ultimately outcompete it,” Doyle said.The researchers then tested these two strains in a fresh poultryprocessing plant. Working with Ecolab Inc., UGA scientists used afoaming agent to apply the bacteria to drains.”The foam adheres to the drain’s surface and gives the goodbacteria an opportunity to attach and grow in their newenvironment,” Doyle said. By Sharon OmahenUniversity of GeorgiaUniversity of Georgia scientists have found bacteria that killlisteria in processing plant floor drains, where the pathogen isknown to settle and multiply.”There are just a few thousand cases of listeria in humans eachyear,” said Michael Doyle, a microbiologist and director of the UGACenter for Food Safety in Griffin, Ga. “But, of those, about 500die. That’s a high mortality rate, and that’s why listeriainfections are a major concern in our country.”Pregnant women, cancer patients and transplant patients are amongthe most frequent cases seen. “Listeria strikes theseimmunocompromised populations hardest,” Doyle said.Luncheon meats = high riskThe U.S. Department of Agriculture identifies luncheon meats ashigh-risk products for listeria infections, Doyle said. Slicedturkey deli meats are high on the list.”Listeria can grow to billions of cells in some refrigeratedluncheon meats,” he said. “And there have been major outbreakstraced to sliced turkey luncheon meats.”The deadly pathogen is often found in processing-plant floordrains. To help fight it, representatives of the processed meatindustry asked Doyle and his UGA colleagues to help find asolution.”Listeria can be widely distributed in processing plants,” Doylesaid. “It grows where there is water in areas like floor drains,where listeria can set up a home.”Unfortunately, floor drains are one of the toughest areas toeffectively clean and treat for listeria in processing plants. Foam/biofilm mixture successfulThe drains were monitored for more than three months. Thefoam/biofilm mixture eliminated listeria in most drains toundetectable numbers for several weeks.”In some drains, where there was a continuous influx of processingwastes, we were able to bring the numbers down dramatically,” Doylesaid, “but we couldn’t totally eliminate the listeria.”Next, the UGA researchers tested the bacteria mixture in a ready-to-eat deli meat processing plant. The listeria numbers are muchlower in these plants than in fresh meat plants.Six drains were treated, and two were used as natural controldrains. After eight weeks, the scientists found five of the sixtreated drains were free of detectable listeria.Ecolab has licensed this technology from UGA and is developing aformulation that will be further tested. The company intends tomake the product commercially available after regulatory review andapproval.last_img read more

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Fungus gardening

first_imgIf you love mushrooms, learn to grow them at home by attending the mushroom gardening class set for Saturday, Nov. 12 at the University of Georgia campus in Griffin, Ga.The class will be held from 10 a.m. until noon at the UGA Research and Education Garden off Ellis Road. The cost is $27. Sarah Workman, a backyard mushroom grower and forest ecologist with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, will teach the course. To register, call (770) 233-6180 or go to www.ugagriffincontinuinged.com/home_garden.php.last_img read more

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