Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) HY2016 Interim Report

first_imgBychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Industrial holding sector has released it’s 2016 interim results for the half year.For more information about Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Bychemex Limited (BYCH.mu)  2016 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileBychemex Limited is a subsidiary of Harel Mallac & Co. Limited and specialises in the manufacturing and sale of specialized chemical products and auxiliaries for the textile industry in Mauritius. Bychemex Limited handles its operations through the segments of textile auxiliaries, bleaching and dyeing chemicals, and scouring chemicals, where the company produces detergents, wetting agents, anti-crease agents, sequestrates, dispersants, and softeners, hydrogen peroxide, brine solution and caustic solutions. Bychemex Limited is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius’ Development and Enterprise Market.last_img read more

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Camelot Ghana Limited (CMLT.gh) 2018 Abridged Report

first_imgCamelot Ghana Limited (CMLT.gh) listed on the Ghana Stock Exchange under the Paper & Packaging sector has released it’s 2018 abridged results.For more information about Camelot Ghana Limited (CMLT.gh) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Camelot Ghana Limited (CMLT.gh) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Camelot Ghana Limited (CMLT.gh)  2018 abridged results.Company ProfileCamelot Ghana Limited is a security printing company involved in the design, processing, printing and finishing of security print orders, business forms and documents and identity products. The company provides a service to governmental departments, financial institutions and multi-national organisations. Security stationary issued by Camelot Ghana Limited ranges from cheque books and banker’s drafts to share certificates, dividend warrants and lottery tickets. The company produces continuous and cut sheet stationary for insurance company forms, optical character recognition (OCR) forms, pre-prints for laser printers, listing paper and airline boarding passes. Company printing solutions range from magstripe encoded cards to UV cured cards, access control cards and ID cards. Government printing solutions for range from council tax forms to utility billing cards, electoral ballot papers and revenue collection tickets. Subsidiaries of Camelot Ghana Limit offer services ranging from holograms, holosealing, embossed hotfoiling to watermarked cheque paper, chemically-sensitive security paper, solvent sensitive inks, tri-thermochromic inks and microtext printing. Camelot Ghana Limited services governments and institutions in Togo, Burkina Faso, Liberia, Benin, Côte d ´Ivoire, Ethiopia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria. The company headquarters are in Accra, Ghana. Camelot Ghana Limited is listed on the Ghana Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Archbishop on the Communion’s challenges and the way forward

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Harry W Shipps says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion, Archbishop of Canterbury Christopher Epting says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Leila DIAB says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Posted Nov 17, 2014 November 17, 2014 at 4:33 pm We indeed have a man for the times and for this moment in history in our Archbishop Justin Welby.“Hear what the Spirit is saying to the church. Amen” Emily Wren says: Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby addresses the Church of England’s General Synod, meeting in London. Photo: Church of England[Lambeth Palace] In his presidential address to the General Synod on Nov. 17, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby spoke about the issues faced by the Anglican Communion and possible ways forward.Read the full text of the address below:During the last eighteen months or so I have had the opportunity to visit thirty-six other Primates of the Anglican Communion at various points. This has involved a total of 14 trips lasting 96 days in all. I incidentally calculated that it involves more than eleven days actually sitting in aeroplanes. This seemed to be a good moment therefore to speak a little about the state of the Communion and to look honestly at some of the issues that are faced and the possible ways forward.A Flourishing CommunionFirst of all, and this needs to be heard very clearly, the Anglican Communion exists and is flourishing in roughly 165 countries. There has been comment over the last year that issues around the Communion should not trouble us in the Church of England because the Communion has for all practical purposes ceased to exist. Not only does it exist, but almost everywhere (there are some exceptions) the links to the See of Canterbury, notwithstanding its Archbishop, are profoundly valued.  The question as to its existence is therefore about what it will look like in the future.   That may be very different, and I will come back to the question.Secondly, Anglicanism is incredibly diverse. To sit, in the space of a few months, in meetings with the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, the Primate of Australia, the Primate of South Africa, the Moderator of the Church of South India, the Primate of Nigeria and many others is to come away utterly daunted by the differences that exist.  They are huge, beyond capacity to deal with adequately in the time for this presentation.  Within the Communion there are perhaps more than 2,000 languages and perhaps more than 500 distinct cultures and ways of looking at the world.  Some of its churches sit in the middle of what are literally the richest parts of the globe, and have within them some of the richest people on earth.  The vast majority are poor. Despite appearances here, we are a poor church for the poor. Many are in countries where change is at a rate that we cannot even begin to imagine.  I think of the man I met in Papua New Guinea who is a civil engineer and whose grandfather was the first of his tribe to see a wheel as a small aircraft landed in a clearing in the forest.At the same time there is a profound unity in many ways. Not in all ways, but having said what I have about diversity, which includes diversity on all sorts of matters including sexuality, marriage and its nature, the use of money, the relations between men and women, the environment, war and peace, distribution of wealth and food, and a million other things, underpinning us is a unity imposed by the Spirit of God on those who name Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour. This diversity is both gift and challenge, to be accepted and embraced, as we seek to witness in truth and love to the good news of Jesus Christ.Thirdly, the potential of the Communion under God is beyond anything we can imagine or think about. We need to hold on to that, there is a prize, the quest for which it is worth almost anything to achieve. The prize is visible unity in Christ despite functional diversity.  It is a prize that is not only of infinite value, but also requires enormous sacrifice and struggle to achieve.  Yet if we even get near it we can speak with authority to a world where over the last year we have seen more than ever an incapacity to deal with difference, and a desire to oversimplify the complex and diverse nature of human existence for no better reason than we cannot manage difference and dealing with The Other. Yet in Christ we are held together.  In Christ the barriers are broken, peace is held out to us as a gift established, which needs living. In Christ there is hope of a life that provides hope of peace.Fourthly, the Communion is extremely active. Let me give you a few examples. In Mexico, a small community abandoned by all, of people who had lost their homes and were living in the bad lands, where a priest (otherwise unoccupied apart from a full-time career in a professional area and running another church, as well as being unpaid) was sent by his bishop, to start a church, something he thought might well cost him his life. But there he went, to the poorest of the poor, and a community has been established with numerous baptisms, growing spirituality and a love and concern and compassion for one another that speaks of the living presence of Jesus among them.Another example, a conference in Oklahoma City, in which from people around The Episcopal Church, with patience and courtesy to one another, there was discussion over the issues around the use of firearms and the meaning of the Second Amendment, the right to bear arms, in practice in the modern-day USA.The South Sudan, and after a day spent burying the dead of a great massacre, the Archbishop stood up with extraordinary courage and called for reconciliation.  Those from the rebel group would already have opposed him, those from his own group would not necessarily have been impressed. To do that puts any of our struggles into a real perspective.In England a church in the middle of an extraordinarily mixed area of religious faith, faithful to the Gospel of Jesus Christ, active in its worship, lively in its preaching, yet being the centre and focus of religious leadership in the area so as to enable difference to be handled well.There are so many others that merit a presentation of its own.We live in a community that exists, that is deeply engaged with its world almost everywhere, that is diverse and argumentative and fractured, but yet shows in so many places both known and unknown the power and love of Christ through His Spirit at work in our world. We live in a Communion which merits celebration and thanksgiving as well as prayer and repentance.A flourishing Communion but also a divided Communion.I do not want to sound triumphalist. There are enormous problems. We have deep divisions in many areas, not only sexuality. There are areas of corruption, other areas where the power of the surrounding culture seems to overwhelm almost everyone at one point or another.Our divisions may be too much to manage.In many parts of the Communion, including here, there is a belief that opponents are either faithless to the tradition, or by contrast that they are cruel, judgemental, inhuman. I have to say that we are in a state so delicate that without prayer and repentance, it is hard to see how we can avoid some serious fractures.In an age of near instant communication, because the Communion exists, and is full of life, vigour and growth, of faith and trust in Jesus Christ, and love for him, everything that one Province does echoes around the world. Every sermon or speech here is heard within minutes and analysed half to death. Every careless phrase in an interview is seen as a considered policy statement. And what is true of all Provinces is ten times more so for us, and especially us in this Synod. We never speak only to each other, and the weight of that responsibility, if we love each other and the world  as we should, must affect our actions and our words.A Communion under threatThere is persecution in the Communion, in many, many areas. We are a poor, and a persecuted Church.We are well aware of that and need to remember it constantly. In very many parts of the world, particularly parts of Africa and the Middle East, but also South East Asia, persecution comes from jihadist attacks which have killed many, many Anglicans, other Christians and in largest number Muslims, over the last few years. Not a day goes by without some report being received of the suffering and persecution of churches around the world, and of cries for help and requests for support. Not a day goes by without something which should break one’s heart at the courage and the difficulties involved.There is immense suffering in the Communion. The terrible spread of Ebola, indescribable, a Black Death sweeping through three Dioceses of West Africa, is by itself a catastrophe of historic proportions. I was briefed on it two weeks ago in Accra, and the suffering of people in the afflicted countries makes the blood run cold. We must help, pray and call for more help.In the South Sudan the human created food shortage threatens to turn into a terrible famine. In DRC the war continues with the utmost cruelty, usually including rape.The list could go on and on, especially in the Middle East, Palestine and Israel, the Levant and the Euphrates valley.Where do we go?So what do we do? Where does this extraordinary, fractious, diverse, argumentative, wonderful, united, ferocious, peaceful, persecuted, suffering  body that is the Communion go, and what is the impact on us here in the Church of England?First, as I have said nothing we say is heard only by us.Secondly, we should rejoice in being part of this monumental challenge, of this great quest for the prize of being a people who can hold unity in diversity and love in difference.  It is almost unimaginably difficult, and most certainly cannot be done except with a whole-hearted openness to the Holy Spirit at work amongst us. It comes with prayer, and us growing closer to God in Jesus Christ and nothing else is an effective substitute. There are no strategies and no plans beyond prayer and obedience.Thirdly, the future of the Communion requires sacrifice.  The biggest sacrifice is that we cannot only work with those we like, and hang out with those whose views are also ours.  Groups of like-minded individuals meeting to support and encourage each other may be necessary, indeed often are very necessary, but they are never sufficient.  Sufficiency is in loving those with whom we disagree.  What may be necessary in the way of party politics, is not sufficient in what might be called the polity of the Church.In this Church of England we must learn to hold in the right order our calling to be one and our calling to advance our own particular position and seek our own particular views to prevail in the Church generally, whether in England or around the world. We must speak the truth in love.In practice that has to mean the discipline of meeting with those with whom we disagree and listening to each other carefully and lovingly. It means doing that as much as when we meet with those with whom we do agree, whether it is during sessions of General Synod or at other times. It means celebrating our salvation together and praying together to the God who is the sole source of our hope and future, together. It means that even when we feel a group is beyond the pale for its doctrine, or for its language about others or us, we must love. Love one another, love your neighbour, love your enemy. Who in the world is in none of those categories?All of us prefer being with those whose tradition we know and in which we were brought up. I am as much part of that as anyone else here. But I have gained far more in my own walk with Jesus Christ through being willing to meet with others whose traditions I did not find sympathetic, and be as transparent with them as I am with my closest friends, as from anything else that I have ever done.And for the future of the Communion? I have not called a Primates’ Meeting on my own authority (although I could) because I feel that it is necessary for the Anglican Communion to develop a collegial model of leadership, as much as it is necessary in the Church of England, and I have therefore waited for the end of the visits to Provinces.If the majority view of the Primates is that such a meeting would be a good thing, one will be called in response.  The agenda for that meeting will not be set centrally, but from around the Primates of the Communion.  One issue that needs to be decided on, ideally by the Primates’ meeting, is whether and if so when there is another Lambeth Conference.  It is certainly achievable, but the decision is better made together carefully, than in haste to meet an artificial deadline of a year ending in 8. A Lambeth Conference is so expensive and so complex that we have to be sure that it is worthwhile. It will not be imposed, but part of a collective decision.The key general point to be established is how the Anglican Communion is led, and what its vision is in the 21st century, in a post-colonial world? How do we reflect the fact that the majority of its members are in the Global South, what is the role of the Instruments of Communion, especially the Archbishop of Canterbury, and what does that look like in lived out practice?  These are great decisions, that must be taken to support the ongoing and uninterrupted work of ministering to a world in great need and in great conflict. Whatever the answer, it is likely to be very different from the past.So, the good news. The Communion exists and is doing wonderful things. The bad news.  There are great divisions and threats. The challenge. There is a prize of being able to develop unity in diversity and also with deeper and deeper ecumenical relations demonstrating the power of Christ to break down barriers and to provide hope for a broken world. We must grasp that challenge, it is the prize of a world seeing Christ loved and obeyed in His church, a world hearing the news of his salvation. So let us here, in the Church of England and above all in its General Synod, be amongst those who take a lead in our sacrificial, truthful and committed love for the sake of Christ for His mission in His world. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Music Morristown, NJ Comments (12) Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Jeremy Bates says: Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events PJ Cabbiness says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel David Benedict says: November 21, 2014 at 6:29 pm “Thirdly, the future of the Communion requires sacrifice. The biggest sacrifice is that we cannot only work with those we like, and hang out with those whose views are also ours…. What may be necessary in the way of party politics, is not sufficient in what might be called the polity of the Church.”Come now, Archbishop. There is no such thing as a worldwide Anglican Church. So do not speak as if there is. Nor should there be. The Anglican Communion is a family of independent churches. And if you try to make it anything more — if you try to establish a worldwide Anglican polity — then you will go too far. And on a fool’s errand, to boot.A lot of us Episcopalians will remember, for very many years to come, that with the Anglican Covenant, your predecessor sought to throw us, and Canada too, under a bus driven by the majority of the Communion.So we are very mistrustful of any effort to centralize power in any sort of London-based structure, no matter how it is administered.The Episcopal Church is autonomous. We are not going to sacrifice that autonomy. It just proved the salvation not only of our church but also of the dignity that we seek to respect in every human being. Comments are closed. November 17, 2014 at 10:37 pm Thank you, Archbishop. Very well said. The glory of our Anglicanism must be exactly what you say, we must stay together in unity through diversity. The energy to do that is through grace and the Holy Spirit. It is up to us to respond to that grace and Spirit, incorporate that energy into our lives and not be afraid to step out and meet the other in the midst of our differences. Jesus calls us to build up the Beloved Community together. Martin Luther King described the Beloved Community as one of redemption and reconciliation. Jesus desires it. Tags Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska November 17, 2014 at 5:05 pm I think the Archbishop has shown very well where our prayers and actions are needed. Thanks you all those who struggle. Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Mark P. Fisher says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Selena Smith says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img November 17, 2014 at 4:13 pm Well stated, Justin. (I do wish he had mentioned the ACC since it too is one of the “instruments of Communion.) The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books November 18, 2014 at 12:05 pm Thank you for this wonderful remark. It is very encouraging. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York December 1, 2014 at 7:53 pm Jeremy Bates speaks with as much wisdom as does the Archbishop, I think. While Jeremy Bates writes that “a lot of us Episcopalians will remember, . . . sought to throw us, and Canada too, under a bus . . .” that is what the Episcopal Church has done to many of its bishops, other clergy and laity, who have been picked up by others. They also will remember the use of that implemented centralized power by the Episcopal Church. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Tampa, FL An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Dennis Delman says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL November 17, 2014 at 4:25 pm Thank you Archbishop for giving us the much needed and unbiased ‘big picture’. Your overview is both encouraging and challenging.+HarrySavannah, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Archbishop on the Communion’s challenges and the way forward Owen Hoskin says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Richard W. Murphy says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ November 18, 2014 at 3:38 pm Thank you for your honest appraisal of the Anglican Communion. I agree with the comment that the ACC – the most representative of the four “instruments” – needs not only to be mentioned, but to beequal participants in decions about the Communion’s future. November 17, 2014 at 8:51 pm Beautiful and heartfelt article. As all parents worry about and work to keep their different children – siblings – together in one family so too does the church worry and work to keep its different children in Christ together and loving one another. I do not find the differences to be so difficult as the anxiety over those differences. In that is a commonality that can be nurtured. Compassion is a desire to unite at the point of differences. Love is ignoring differences which facilitates unity. To find Christ in each other we need to stop defining each other by our material circumstances and see past the catagories and classifications. We are more than the sum of our parts. We are the Holy Family of Christ. We all have the same last name. November 25, 2014 at 12:38 pm Well thought out and well presented by the Archbishop. Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN November 17, 2014 at 9:32 pm I would bet that such an honest, thoughtful, and yet exploratory assessment of the state of the church could be similarly expressed by many communions in Christendom, further extending the universal unity Christians have in an incredible diversity. Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA last_img read more

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Want to support veterans? 4 tips for finding good charities

first_img Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your name here Brian Mittendorf is a Distinguished Professor and Chair, Department of Accounting & Management Information Systems (MIS) at the Fisher College of Business – The Ohio State University. He researches and teaches courses in nonprofit financial statements and financial management. The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your comment! TAGSNon-Profittheconversation.comVeterans Previous articleApopka dentist hosts free dental day for Veterans todayNext articleFlorida 60 days after Hurricane Irma Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Many Americans donate to charities that help military veterans as a way to honor them for their service to the country. It can, however, be daunting to choose from the more than 8,000 such groups operating nationwide.Donor trepidation is magnified by the scandals that have embroiled vets’ groups. In fact, more than 10 percent of the charities tagged as “America’s Worst Charities” by the Tampa Bay Times and the Center for Investigative Reporting in 2013 focus on veterans.As a professor who researches nonprofit organizations and teaches about their finances, I have observed that while some veterans’ charities do squander donors’ dollars, others make the most of donations in meeting their mission. Fortunately, a little research goes a long way toward spotting the difference between a good cause and a lost cause.The following four tips will help you vet these charities.1. Learn what exactly the charities doBe wary of vague statements about a group’s activities. While language indicating that a charity “supports” or “honors” veterans does not always signal a problem, it does mean you should seek more specific information. Many of the veterans’ charities that have faced criticism, such as Paralyzed Veterans of America and National Veterans Services Fund, have had vague mandates to educate the public about what veterans need. It’s hard but not impossible to decide which veterans’ charities deserve a thumbs-up – and your donation. Reuters/Kevin LamarqueA detailed description of a group’s mission and activities can instill confidence that veterans truly benefit from its work. An exemplary charity is the Honor Flight Network, which flies veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit military monuments and honor fallen colleagues. The benefits are self-evident, as I’ve seen firsthand as a flight volunteer. Fisher House Foundation, which provides temporary housing to families of veterans receiving treatment at VA facilities, is another good example. There are many ways that organizations can and do directly serve veterans. To find them, look for clear-cut programs you find meaningful and significant.2. Find out what share of the money raised for organizations actually supports themAnother common pitfall: for-hire fundraisers that siphon too much of the donated funds.Michigan’s attorney general determined that only 39 percent of funds raised by professional solicitors for charity in the state in 2016 actually supported those groups. The fundraising contractors kept the rest of the money. The picture is even more lopsided for veterans’ charities in the state, with only 23 percent of donations making it into their coffers. The track record in Michigan is no anomaly – New York, Massachusetts and other states have found similar patterns.Operation Homefront, which Consumer Reports named as one of the best veterans’ charities last year, clearly states on its website how much it spends supporting its mission. Operation HomefrontProfessional solicitation is not inherently problematic – but outsourced fundraisers keeping most of the money raised for a charity is a real concern. The federal government does not track this information but most offices of state attorneys general maintain databases that indicate how the organizations raising funds in their states stack up.Since national campaigns also show up in these databases, even if your own state doesn’t make all the details easily accessible, you can use the online tools other states offer to evaluate different charities. New York’s database is especially user-friendly.3. Check out IRS 990 formsOK. I know perusing IRS forms is not everyone’s favorite activity. But it’s the best way to discover how donor dollars are actually spent. Finding a charity’s tax form is easy, even if groups don’t post them on their own websites, thanks to databases like Propublica’s Nonprofit Explorer and the Foundation Center’s 990 Finder.The Semper Fi Fund 990 form from its 2016 fiscal year suggests that the group does not spend an excessive amount of money on fundraising and administration. Semper Fi FundIf you do check out a 990 form, be sure to go to page 10. That’s where nonprofits classify their expenses, both by function and type. There, you can see where donated money primarily goes. If the organization has a stated focus on providing financial assistance to veterans, for example, you should see lots of grants to individuals on line 2, and not so much in the way of advertising, travel and postage listed on the other lines.Consider how the Semper Fi Fund, a group that provides financial and other aid to injured and ill post-9/11 veterans and their families, stated its functional expenses for its 2016 fiscal year. The numbers indicate that the group spends over 90 percent of its funds on its mission. Three-fourths of that mission spending is direct grants to individuals – a good sign.4. Inquire about donor privacy policiesWhen you make charitable donations, you give away both money and personal information. What charities do with your personal data is part of the picture and how they handle this information varies widely.Consider how the Wounded Warrior Project, among the nation’s most visible veterans’ organizations, has handled donor data. The group came under fire in 2015 and 2016 for alleged waste, as well as routinely selling personal information culled from its donors to other nonprofits and defending this practice. The controversy resulted in a shakeup at the top.Other groups do a better job of protecting donor privacy. Fisher House Foundation, which clearly states a policy of not sharing or selling donor lists, offers a good example of how to do this. If an organization doesn’t state its privacy policy on its website, take the time to ask.When it comes to vetting charities, a little work goes a long way. These four steps should help you find veterans’ charities with goals that match your own and that you can trust to make the most of the money you give away. By Brian Mittendorf of the Fisher College of Business and first published in theconversation.com Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

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Football League chooses Help for Heroes

first_imgFootball League chooses Help for Heroes Tagged with: charity of the year corporate  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1 The Football League has chosen ‘Help for Heroes’ as its Official Charity Partner for the 2009/10 season. Football fans were invited to vote for their favourite charity from five shortlisted charities – The Bobby Moore Fund, Care of Police Survivors, Everyman, Marie Curie and Help for Heroes.Twenty five thousand votes were recorded. The top two causes were then passed to the League Board who made the final decision to choose Help for Heroes.Founded in the summer of 2007, Help for Heroes raises funds for all members of the Armed Forces injured whilst serving their country. Advertisement Howard Lake | 21 September 2009 | Newscenter_img As Official Charity Partner, Help for Heroes will enjoy considerable exposure across The Football League’s clubs.The Armed Forces themselves will be honoured at the Coca-Cola Football League Play-Offs Finals at Wembley with more than 300 troops receiving VIP treatment.The scale of the response from fans has encouraged the Board to take the unprecedented step of naming Marie Curie, runner up to Help for Heroes, as the Official Partner for the 2010/11 campaign.www.football-league.co.uk About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis1last_img read more

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Pakistani man shoots ex-wife for working as journalist

first_img Help by sharing this information Organisation Arooj Iqbal was gunned down on 24 November outside her home in Lahore, the capital of Punjab province (photo provided by the family – Image: DB / RSF). to go further News January 28, 2021 Find out more News June 2, 2021 Find out more Pakistani journalist critical of the military wounded by gunfire Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the authorities in the Pakistani province of Punjab to ensure that newspaper owner Dilawar Ali is tried for murdering his ex-wife, Arooj Iqbal, after she refused to stop working as a journalist. News “When I was not married, my family was very worried about my doing journalism,” she added. “And instead of shielding me when I was under threat, they asked me to quit journalism.” According to a 2018 report by RSF’s partner organization in Pakistan, Freedom Network, fewer than 5% of Pakistan’s journalists are women. They are subjected to many forms of discrimination, including lower pay, psychological and sexual harassment, being restricted to covering “women’s” issues, and pressure from their families not to work in a male-dominated environment. December 11, 2019 – Updated on July 16, 2020 Pakistani man shoots ex-wife for working as journalist April 21, 2021 Find out more Newscenter_img “We call on the Punjabi police and judicial authorities to do everything possible to ensure that this shocking crime does not go unpunished,” said Daniel Bastard, the head of RSF’s Asia-Pacific desk. “This femicide is a damning example of the condition of women journalists in Pakistan, who need immense courage to work openly despite the constant heavy pressure from the prevailing patriarchy.” Pakistani supreme court acquits main suspect in Daniel Pearl murder “Environment of fear” Receive email alerts PakistanAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesProtecting journalists WomenImpunityViolence “Women journalists work in an environment of fear, we are harassed at every step and at every moment,” Asma Shirazi told RSF. Pakistan’s first woman war reporter, initially in Lebanon and then along Pakistan’s border with Afghanistan, Shirazi received the Peter Mackler Award for Courageous and Ethical Journalism in 2014. The owner of Anticrime, a local newspaper for which the 27-year-old Arooj Iqbal used to work, Ali shot her in the head as she entered her home in Lahore, the provincial capital, on 24 November. She died on the spot. “He wanted her to drop the idea of launching her own local newspaper,” Iqbal’s brother, Yasir Iqbal, told RSF, adding that she had recently filed a complaint against Ali because he was threatening to kill her if she did not stop working as a reporter. Her own newspaper was to have been called Choice. RSF_en Although arrested for shooting Urooj Iqbal, Ali managed to get released on bail. Iqbal’s brother plans to contest that decision at a bail confirmation court hearing on 14 December. PakistanAsia – Pacific Condemning abusesProtecting journalists WomenImpunityViolence Pakistan is ranked 142nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2019 World Press Freedom Index. Follow the news on Pakistan Pakistani TV anchor censored after denouncing violence against journalistslast_img read more

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Yanukovych commits Ukraine to authoritarian path

first_img January 20, 2014 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Yanukovych commits Ukraine to authoritarian path Crimean journalist “confesses” to spying for Ukraine on Russian TV UkraineEurope – Central Asia March 26, 2021 Find out more to go further News UkraineEurope – Central Asia News President Viktor Yanukovych promulgated Law 3879 on the evening of 17 January, just one day after parliament violated voting procedure to pass it (see below).“The international community needs to understand the full significance of this development,” Reporters Without Borders said. “This law drastically restricts freedom of information and other fundamental freedoms guaranteed by Ukraine’s constitution. “By promulgating it, the president has moved Ukraine on to a completely different, anti-democratic path. This contempt for civil society will just fuel the ongoing social tension. The repeal of Law 3879 must be an integral part of any plan for resolving the crisis.”———-16.01.2014 – Is Ukraine going to bury freedom of information?Reporters Without Borders is appalled by the Ukrainian parliament’s hasty adoption today of Law 3879, a legislative package that copies some of the most repressive provisions of recent Russian legislation.Among other things, the 130-page law criminalizes defamation, facilitates the blocking of websites without referring to the courts and defines human rights NGOs that receive international funding as “foreign agents.” It contains many other provisions restricting freedom of expression and assembly. “We urge President Viktor Yakukovych not to promulgate this law, which would represent a decisive step back from democracy,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Designed to halt the wave of opposition protests that began in early December, it increases abusive restrictions on freedom of information and other fundamental freedoms. The way it was adopted in parliament, in violation of voting procedure, reinforces the clear impression that it constitutes a major attack on civil society.”Law 3879 “amending the law on the judicial apparatus and the status of judges and establishing additional measures to protect the safety of citizens” was submitted to parliament just two days ago by two representatives of the ruling Party of the Regions and was adopted today, without any debate, on a show of hands instead of the usual electronic vote.It reintroduces an article on defamation (article 151-1) into the criminal code. When the media or Internet is used to defame, the penalty is a fine of between 50 and 300 times the minimum wage, 150 to 240 hours of public service work, or salary deductions for one year. If there are “aggravating circumstances,” the penalty can be up to two years in prison.Such penalties are clearly disproportionate and contrary to article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights, as interpreted by the European Court in Strasbourg.International experience has shown that criminalizing media offences and, even more so, making them punishable by imprisonment, helps to create a climate of intimidation that discourages journalists from tackling sensitive subjects.“The return of defamation to the penal code constitutes a 13-year backward step for Ukraine,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Moving in the opposition direction to the worldwide trend, Ukraine is blatantly violating international agreements that is has signed, starting with the European Convention on Human Rights and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights.”Ukraine decriminalized defamation in January 2001. A first attempt to roll back this victory for democracy was narrowly averted in October 2012 following concerted protests by civil society and the international community. In response to the concerns that Reporters Without Borders expressed at the time, the foreign ministry reiterated Ukraine’s commitment to freedom of information and European standards.Law 3879 also introduces prison sentences for “extremist content” without providing a clear definition of this concept. It makes gathering and disseminating personal information (including names and photos) about judges, policemen and members of the special forces punishable by up to three years in prison. It regulates online news agencies more closely and empowers the authorities to close a website without a court order.It imports the controversial provisions that Russia has applied to human rights NGOs since 2012. Those that aim to “influence state decisions, change government policy and shape public opinion” and receive international funding will now have to register as “foreign agents.”This disgraceful label, a synonym of spying in former Soviet republics, is accompanied by very strict rules and financial requirements that result in severe sanctions if violated. Also, NGOs that are “foreign agents” as not recognized as non-profits and must pay the same taxes as businesses.(Photo : Ukraïnska Pravda) Receive email alerts Newscenter_img News Organisation RSF_en Follow the news on Ukraine Ukrainian media group harassed by broadcasting authority February 26, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information Ukraine escalates “information war” by banning three pro-Kremlin media September 7, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Support for lawsuit brought against Iranian government before Montreal court

first_img News News CanadaAmericas December 3, 2009 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Support for lawsuit brought against Iranian government before Montreal court Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders is supporting the lawsuit which Stephan Hashemi has brought against the Islamic Republic of Iran before a Montreal court in an bid to obtain reparation for the detention, torture and death of his mother, photo-journalist Zahra Kazemi, in a Tehran prison in July 2003. Kazemi had Iranian and Canadian dual citizenship and lived in Montreal. After two years of legal stalling and postponements in February and May of this year, the Quebec province superior court in Montreal began hearing the case yesterday and is due to continue until 8 December. The Canadian section of Reporters Without Borders plans to attend all the hearings.The first few days are expected to be given over to the attempts of both the Canadian and Iranian governments to have the case thrown out on the grounds that a federal law called the State Immunity Act prevents lawsuits against foreign governments before Canadian courts except in certain circumstances that do not apply to this case. The two governments have list of nearly 200 precedents in which this law was applied.Reporters Without Borders points out the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees every Canadian’s right to due process according to the principles of fundamental justice that guide Canadian law. At the same time, the judge hearing the case has accepted that such a hearing would be impossible in Iran because of its highly political nature.“For the past six years, the Islamic Republic of Iran has done everything possible to ensure that Kazemi’s murderers, including former Tehran prosecutor-general Sayeed Mortazavi, go unpunished,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Mortazavi continues to enjoy the direct protection of Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei and President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. Canada and the European Union should support the Kazemi’s family’s attempt to end this impunity.”Kazemi was arrested on 23 June 2003 while photographing the families of detainees waiting outside Evin prison in north Tehran. She was tortured during detention and died on 10 July as result of the injuries she had received.In a press release on 26 June of this year, Canadian foreign minister Lawrence Cannon noted that two official investigations had confirmed that it was Mortazavi who ordered Kazemi’s arrest and detention, which resulted in her being “tortured to death.” Mortazavi is also alleged to have forged documents to conceal his role in her death.The Kazemi family’s lawyers have repeatedly condemned the judicial proceedings in Iran as a farce. Their attempts to summon senior judicial officials for questioning were never successful, with the result that key witnesses never testified. Mortazavi was never questioned, also he was person who ordered Kazemi’s arrest and was present while she was interrogated.“The government of Iran is fully responsible for the death under torture of my mother Zahra Kazemi,” Hashemi said. “It is also a very clear and proven case of cover-up by the Iranian government.” Receive email alerts Follow the news on Canada “We must impose democratic obligations on the leading digital players” On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia RSF_en center_img CanadaAmericas News November 19, 2020 Find out more News to go further January 15, 2021 Find out more Organisation Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” November 11, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Cllr Shiels – UK windfarm developers targeting Donegal are laughing all the way to…

first_img Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal By admin – March 27, 2015 Cllr Shiels – UK windfarm developers targeting Donegal are laughing all the way to the bank 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Homepage BannerNews Twitter A Donegal Cllr has claimed that UK windfarm developers targeting the county are laughing all the way to the bank.Planree Ltd have applied to An Board Pleanala to develop Irelands biggest onshore windfarm at Carrickduff Hill and Lismullyduff.The proposed windfarm could see up to 49 wind turbines built over 20 townlands from Barnesmore Gap right up to the Castlefin area.The Council is due to consider its proposed submission to An Bord Pleanala on the planned wind farm at its meeting on Monday, while submissions or objections from the public must be submitted today.Cllr Dessie Shiels says some local authority’s charge 25,000 per turbine, where as in Co Donegal developers are charged nothing:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/dessie.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firecenter_img Pinterest Previous articleDonegal make two changes for relegation battle with TyroneNext articleÚdarás na Gaeltachta to create 300 jobs in Gweedore with €4.7 million investment admin 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Google+ Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

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3 elite soldiers hospitalized after night parachute training accident in Florida

first_imgA member of the U.S. Army Golden Knights jumps out of a UV-18C during an aerial performance for the Thunder Over the Rock Air and Space Show at Little Rock Air Force Base, Ark., Oct. 27, 2018. (Rhett Isbell/U.S. Air Force) FILE(HOMESTEAD, Fla.) — Three elite soldiers from the U.S. Army Parachute Team were injured early Tuesday morning during a training accident at Homestead Air Reserve Base in Homestead, Florida, according to the Army.The soldiers were participating in a low-altitude night training operation around 4 a.m. when the incident occurred.A U.S. defense official told ABC News that two of the soldiers are in “very serious condition,” with the third soldier in “serious condition.” They are being treated at Jackson Memorial Hospital’s Ryder Trauma Center in Miami.“The incident is under investigation at this time,” the Army said in a statement.The soldiers were members of the Golden Knights, the Army’s competitive skydiving team that frequently does demonstrations at sporting events and air shows. While based at Fort Bragg in North Carolina, the team conducts its winter training at Homestead from mid-January to mid-March.The official described the Golden Knights as “the best of the best.”In November, the team parachuted into the San Francisco 49ers and New York Giants Monday Night Football game at Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara, California. And in October, they performed an aerial demonstration at the Thunder Over the Rock Air and Space Show at Little Rock Air Force Base, Arkansas.There were are record number of elite military airborne-related deaths in 2015, according to Navy Times, but that was followed by a sharp drop in the following two years.In 2015, two military parachute jumpers, including one Golden Knight, were hospitalized after colliding in midair at the Chicago Air and Water Show.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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