Cim Financial Services Ltd (CIM.mu) 2012 Prospectus

first_imgCim Financial Services Ltd (CIM.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Financial sector has released it’s 2012 prospectus For more information about Cim Financial Services Ltd (CIM.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Cim Financial Services Ltd (CIM.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Cim Financial Services Ltd (CIM.mu)  2012 prospectus Company ProfileCim Financial Services Limited (Cim Group) is headquartered in Mauritius that is regulated by the bank of Mauritius as a non-banking deposit taking institution and licenced by the Financial Services Commission as a credit financing institution offering a range of credit.  The company avails individual consumers, SMEs and large corporates with financial services such as consumer finance, crediLimited t card, forex, leasing and factoring. Cim Financial Services is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

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The power of Pentecost

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] Editor’s note: This piece was first published in Faith & Leadership.I’ve always loved Pentecost, the day when language barriers fall and Christians rejoice that the gospel of Jesus Christ is the same in every tongue. In part, this affection comes from growing up bilingual near Montreal, moving constantly between two linguistic worlds.Perhaps nothing epitomized that unceasing back and forth more than my family’s two newspaper subscriptions. Every day, my Scottish immigrant mother read The Gazette, and my French-speaking father, La Presse. As my parents finished their respective papers, they handed them, section by section, to me.At the time — the turbulent 1970s and ’80s — majority-francophone Quebec was debating whether to remain a Canadian province or break away to form an independent republic. Reading the daily news from two perspectives, I could see the danger of being aligned too closely with any political authority that could rise or fall overnight.From the time I started school and learned “O Canada” in both official languages, I knew that earthly power was always contested, overtly or discreetly. Although national anthems are intended to unite citizens, I was surprised to discover that English-speaking and French-speaking Canadians sing completely different songs to the same tune.The English version celebrates “the true North strong and free” (from American domination), while the French lyrics laud the Roman Catholic faith for sustaining our ancestors after Great Britain conquered New France in 1760.My parents never dwelled on that amusing difference or the deadly serious political debates that swirled around us. Instead, they reassured me that our family could live peacefully as citizens of either a united Canada or an independent Quebec, and they ensured that I would have the linguistic skills to build relationships across their two cultures.When I joined the church as an adult, I found that my parents’ suspicion of earthly power had prepared me well for life as a Christian. I could readily affirm the gospel claim that the true citizenship of Christ’s disciples is in God’s kingdom, to which every other loyalty — to country, culture or clan — is subordinate. In a world where powers and principalities seek to pit one group against another, our only hope of living into our divine citizenship is the unsettling and sustaining power of the Holy Spirit.That is the power we celebrate on Pentecost. When we recite our multilingual liturgies, we evoke that long-ago day in Jerusalem when citizens of Rome and subjects of its territories, Jews born to the faith and new converts, all understood the apostles’ message without a human interpreter.Multilingual Pentecost services always gladden my heart and remind me of home. But they also make me wonder, what are churches doing the rest of the year to break down cultural barriers? Often, the answer is very little. Even when we try, we typically approach the issues in ways that ignore the power dynamics at work among us, relics of the idolatries of race, culture and nation.It happens with the best of intentions. A white church in a small town wants its black counterpart down the street to “end segregation” by closing its doors and joining the white church — because, after all, “our building is bigger.” Or the exhausted African-American or Latino parishioner is asked to serve on every committee, no matter what his or her particular gifts for ministry might be, because “we need a minority perspective.” Anyone will do.These examples, both unfortunately real, make me wince. They make me wonder, what invitations from the Holy Spirit am I missing in my ignorance or declining in my arrogance?The biblical witness tells me the Spirit sends them: invitations to listen for truths spoken in an unfamiliar accent, to sing a familiar song to a new melody, to hear a Bible story narrated from a perspective I’d rather ignore because it threatens my understanding of the world.God offers these invitations not because the church is one more diversity program to be tweaked according to the latest census data but because the messianic age has come. The reign of Babel has ended, and Jesus Christ’s followers are called to proclaim that reality.Possibilities for proclamation abound wherever creative, faithful witnesses are open to the Spirit’s prompting. When I lived in Louisville, Ky., a white Presbyterian pastor in town told me about a partnership he had started in the 1990s between his congregation and a much larger neighboring African-American church.“I approached a church that was twice the size of ours, with a far better choir, because I didn’t want our folks to have any excuse to harbor delusions of superiority,” the pastor told me.Grounded in such canny humility, a relationship between the two churches took root and thrived. They exchanged preachers and choirs, co-hosted picnics and studied Scripture together.One particular practice, however, was designed to make discussions of power inevitable. Every week, one pair from each church would visit the local courthouse together to observe criminal proceedings. The four sat with each other, taking notes about what they saw.Afterward, they discussed their observations over lunch and prayed together for everyone they had watched in the courtroom that day — victims, defendants and their families, prosecutors and defense attorneys, judges and court employees. Every day, they witnessed the disproportionate impact on black Americans of the stricter drug laws and mandatory minimum sentences that were then taking effect.Over time, as their trust in one another deepened, their discussions grew richer. Soon, they were praying together for guidance about how else to embody God’s healing love in a city that desperately needed it.Who knows where such projects might lead? If we believe the promise of Pentecost, then perhaps nothing less than “turning the world upside down” (Acts 17:6). As our first-century ancestors discovered, we can expect resistance if we start down that road — from the civil authorities, maybe from the church, and certainly, from time to time, from our own fearful hearts.But what alternative do we have if we are to be citizens of the kingdom? Try to confine the power of Pentecost to one day a year? Turn our sanctuaries into tombs, seeking to seal the Spirit inside? We know what God does when human beings try that.God offers us resurrection and new life. Or, as we say in Montreal, Il nous offre la résurrection et une nouvelle vie.The same gifts, through the same power, in any language.— The Rev. Rhonda Mawhood Lee is associate rector of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Durham, N.C., and an independent scholar and a spiritual director. A bicultural native of Montreal, she has lived in the United States since 1992. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs By Rhonda Mawhood LeePosted May 29, 2012 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Press Release Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Susan Butler says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (1) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Press Release Service Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The power of Pentecost TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 30, 2012 at 8:01 am Thank you very much for the image of the court house observers reflecting together. Going out together with the purpose of bringing God’s justice and compassion cements the unity we have as Christians and lets our differences bring richness the prayer and action we undertake together. Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

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Hoosier Homestead and National Ag Day Celebrations at Statehouse

first_imgDeKalbWidney – Carpenter1836Sesquicentennial RipleyMerkel1864Centennial & Sesquicentennial By Eric Pfeiffer – Mar 18, 2019 SHARE Facebook Twitter DecaturFry1916Centennial BartholomewFranke – Thompson1898Centennial WabashDennis Keith Gilbert1919Centennial AllenMarshall1855Sesquicentennial PulaskiLeonard Farms Incorporated1868Sesquicentennial DuboisRauscher – Thieman1838Centennial & Sesquicentennial ClarkRichard M. Myers, Sr. & Larry N. Myers1848Sesquicentennial TippecanoeKirkpatrick1841Sesquicentennial ClarkMartin1907Centennial RipleyJager1866Centennial & Sesquicentennial VigoKessel1901Centennial FayetteSykes1845Centennial & Sesquicentennial Hoosier Homestead and National Ag Day Celebrations at Statehouse CrawfordSharp – Stephenson – Mohr1819Bicentennial CarrollCarnell – Brown – Stone1836Sesquicentennial WellsKreigh1869   Sesquicentennial SpencerLueken1868Sesquicentennial VermillionRedman1914Centennial MadisonBlake1866Sesquicentennial HarrisonStoner – Watson – Yates1859Centennial & Sesquicentennial Farm CountyAward NameHomestead DateType of Award SpencerAdolph Hurm1869Sesquicentennial DuboisJochum1912Centennial HowardAlice L. Maish & Myron E. Maish1860Sesquicentennial HowardPeters1908Centennial ClarkMcKinley/Roberts/Hoke1877Centennial MiamiVincent1865Sesquicentennial NoblePiper/McLallin1869Sesquicentennial LaPorteShurte Family Farm1854Centennial & Sesquicentennial BartholomewRobert & Barbara Pruitt1919Centennial Hoosier Homestead and National Ag Day Celebrations at StatehouseLt. Governor Suzanne Crouch, ISDA Director Bruce Kettler, Indiana’s Family of Farmers Jeanette Merritt, with Essay Winner Josie Butler, 5th Grader at Tipton ElementaryThe past few days at the Indiana Statehouse has been a celebration of agriculture. On Friday, Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch and Indiana State Department of Agriculture Director Bruce Kettler celebrated farm families by presenting Hoosier Homestead Awards. Kettler says it’s one of his favorite days of the year.“We celebrated 55 families that have had farms in their family for at least 100 years. With that award, we celebrate the 100, 150, and we actually even had two bicentennial awards celebrating 200 years.”Those celebrating 200 years were the Sharp, Stephenson, and Mohr families in Crawford County and Fred Wilson, Jr. from Vigo County. The list of recipients can be found below.On Monday, Indiana’s Family of Farmers, which is made up of many ag commodity groups and ag organizations in the state, celebrated National Ag Day in Indiana at the Statehouse. There was an essay contest held for 4th-6th graders that focused on this year’s Ag Day theme, “Agriculture: Food for Life”. Josie Butler from Tipton Elementary School was this year’s winner.“My teacher told me that I could win 10 extra credit points by doing this essay, and I decided to do it, and now I’m here!”She got more than just those extra credit points. She was awarded $200 for her essay. Butler does not live on a farm or have an ag background. Kettler says he’s happy that Butler’s teacher offered the extra credit and that Indiana’s Family of Farmers are looking to engage students not necessarily familiar with agriculture.“They wanted to make sure that we could get students aware of agriculture and I think it’s a pretty safe to say, especially with her and with really with both essay winners that we recognized today, we’re making an impact and getting young people to think about what our industry is all about.”Butler’s essay revolved around her noticing the words “locally grown” on items at the grocery store. She also has a deep interest in weather, so she researched the impacts the weather can have on farmers.“Farmers depend on the weather because if it’s too hot their cops can die and if there’s too much rain their crops can get too much water and also die.”She’s still young and didn’t want to sign a contract today, but she didn’t rule out replacing Ryan Martin at some point as Hoosier Ag Today’s Chief Meteorologist. MiamiGraham – Scott1893Centennial Facebook Twitter VermillionHughes1834Sesquicentennial WellsWhite’s Tangelwood Farm1837 Sesquicentennial ParkeThomas D. Thompson & Vera M. Lear1886Centennial AdamsJacob & Mary Henschen1913Centennial PutnamAlcorn1918Centennial WarrickLamar1916Centennial RipleyRaab1866Sesquicentennial ClintonRothenberger1867Centennial & Sesquicentennial SpencerLloyd1848 Sesquicentennial SpencerRichard & Loyce Gries (Arnold)1902Centennial SpencerLloyd, Linegar & Richards1909Centennial DuboisWinkenhofer – Thieman1841Centennial & Sesquicentennial ClintonSkiles/Oliver1908Centennial HuntingtonFelton1917Centennial JasperWortley1911Centennial TiptonNewlon1849Centennial & Sesquicentennial NewtonWilliam Frederick Stath1890Centennial Home Indiana Agriculture News Hoosier Homestead and National Ag Day Celebrations at Statehouse CarrollChilders1919Centennial HarrisonEisenmenger1869 Sesquicentennial MontgomeryGoff – Clark1912Centennial LaGrangeFoster – Oliver1881Centennial DecaturS & G Seeds, LLC.1918Centennial RushHodson1913Centennial SHARE VigoFred L. Wilson, Jr.1817Sesquicentennial & Bicentennial Previous articleEPA Moving Slowly Toward New Clean Water RuleNext articleRyan Martin’s Indiana Ag Forecast for March 19, 2019 Eric Pfeifferlast_img read more

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Weekly threatened by court order confiscating its earnings in four-year old libel case

first_imgNews Organisation RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance September 27, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Weekly threatened by court order confiscating its earnings in four-year old libel case RSF_en Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa News April 28, 2021 Find out more News Help by sharing this information Hunger strike is last resort for some imprisoned Moroccan journalists June 8, 2021 Find out more Morocco / Western SaharaMiddle East – North Africa to go further Follow the news on Morocco / Western Sahara Receive email alerts NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say News Reporters Without Borders voices concern about a court order that is clearly designed to put Le Journal Hebdomadaire, one of Morocco’s leading independent weeklies, out of business. Reporters Without Borders today condemned a court order confiscating the earnings of Le Journal Hebdomadaire, saying it was clearly designed to put one of Morocco’s leading independent weeklies out of business.The newspaper was told on 18 September that its earnings and those of Assahifa, an Arabic-language weekly belonging to the same group, are to be seized as a result of a libel action brought by foreign minister Mohammed Benaïssa in 2001. Benaïssa obtained a summary judgment ordering payment of 700,000 dirhams (63,000 euros) in damages, although the case is pending before the supreme court.Reporters Without Borders said it was “very concerned” that the threat to the Journal Hebdomadaire’s survival has come at moment when the monarchy is very upset by its critical reporting and its revelations about Hicham Mandari, a Moroccan citizen murdered in Spain in August who had access to the palace under the late King Hassan II and who claimed to know state secrets.”The only solution that would respect press freedom and at the same time show that Morocco’s judges are independent would be for the court of cassation to point out the procedural shortcomings in the appeal court ruling and thereby overturn the confiscation order that could put the newspaper out of business,” the organisation said.Reached by telephone, Journal Hebdomadaire editor Ali Amar recalled that the authorities had originally banned his newspaper in December 2000, when it was called Le Journal, and it had reappeared three months later under its present name.Since then, “the authorities have no longer dared attack us frontally,” he told Reporters Without Borders. “Instead, they now always proceed in the same way. First, a smear campaign orchestrated by the regime’s security agents in certain newspapers. Then the real problems start : an exhaustive tax review or an advertising boycott. This time the authorities decided to revive a four-year-old libel suit in order to strangle us financially.”Amar said the smear campaign against him and the Journal Hebdomadaire began after it published an interview with Mandari at the end of July 2003. A special issue entitled “Five years without him,” giving a critical assessment of the first five years of King Mohammed VI’s reign also irked the authorities.In the Benaïssa libel case, Amar and Aboubakr Jamaï, the newspaper’s managing editor, were originally fined 2 million dirhams in February 2001 and were given a suspended prison sentenced. The fine was reduced on appeal to 700,000 dirhams. April 15, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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54 waiting on trolleys threatens patient safety in Limerck

first_imgTwitter Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSfeaturedlimericknursespatientstrolley watchUHLuniversity hospital limerick WhatsApp Advertisement Email Vanishing Ireland podcast documenting interviews with people over 70’s, looking for volunteers to share their stories Linkedin Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” center_img Print Facebook Previous articleChamber to announce new directorsNext articleIAG commitments do little to allay Limerick’s business concerns Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie THE number of people waiting on trollies at a Limerick hospital is “threatening patient safety”, according to a Limerick TD.Willie O’Dea TD has expressed concern following another dramatic rise in the number of people waiting on trolleys in University Hospital Limerick’s Emergency Department. The latest figures from the Irish Nurses and Midwives Organisation show there are 54 people awaiting admission at University Hospital Limerick.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The trolley watch figures for UHL, the highest throughout the country for this Tuesday, showed that 39 patients were in the hospital’s Emergency Department with a further 15 on trollies in the hospital’s wards.Deputy O’Dea commented, “Once again, we see the situation in University Hospital Limerick’s Emergency Department reaching critical levels. Despite having predicted a worsening of the situation, Minister Leo Varadkar’s response has been unbelievably muted. The Emergency Department Taskforce has only held three meetings to date, despite the escalating crisis.Hospital management has blamed an increase in the prevalence of flu virus and the additional numbers presenting to the ED for the surge.However Deputy O’Dea has claimed that “any measures which were being considered when the crisis had reached its peak in early January appear to have stalled, and now the trolley figures are on the rise once again. We cannot afford to have a repeat of the scenes which were witnesses last month, when people were being deprived of privacy and dignity, being treated in chairs or on trolleys in corridors in busy Emergency Departments. This is not the quality of care that patients should be faced with, when they are unwell and vulnerable.”A statement issued by the UL hospitals group said that the number on trollies had fallen by 50 per cent, but admitted the numbers “still remain above what we would like”.“The UL Hospital Group has seen an increase in patients waiting in their Emergency Department at University Hospital Limerick (UHL), due to a high volume of patients presenting to the ED. The Hospital Group has also seen an increase in the prevalence of the flu virus,” read the statement.The contingency plan put in place to deal with over-crowding in the ED at UHL has been enacted, to assist in reducing numbers in the ED to the targeted thresholds.Management had recently placed a cap of 20 people to be waiting on trollies.All available beds are open across the group and where possible patients are being transferred from UHL to Ennis, Nenagh and St John’s for ongoing treatment.Deputy O’Dea said however that “The Minister has failed to take adequate steps to address Emergency Department overcrowding, despite a range of measures being proposed by nursing and medical unions. The simple fact of the matter is there are not enough step-down beds, hospital beds and frontline medical staff to treat the increased number of patients creating an intolerable risk to patient safety.“Additional resources must be allocated without delay if this situation is to be contained and managed effectively. If these measures are not forthcoming, the appalling situation facing patients in University Hospital Limerick’s Emergency Department will continue to get worse”. NewsBreaking news54 waiting on trolleys threatens patient safety in LimerckBy Staff Reporter – February 3, 2015 735 Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed livelast_img read more

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WeWork will accept Bitcoin for membership fees

first_imgWeWork CEO Sandeep Mathrani. (Getty, WeWork)WeWork will begin to accept cryptocurrency, including Bitcoin and Ethereum, as a form of payment for its workspaces.The company announced Tuesday that customers can use the currency to pay for memberships; it will then use the cryptocurrency to pay its landlords and other vendors whenever possible, the Commercial Observer reported.“WeWork has always been at the forefront of innovative technologies, finding new ways to support our members,” CEO Sandeep Mathrani said in a statement to the publication. “It only makes sense for us to expand on the optionality we provide by adding cryptocurrency as an accepted form of payment for our members.”ADVERTISEMENTRead moreKent Swig launches his own cryptocurrencyBig on Bitcoin: Caruso now largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrencyWeWork in talks to go public via SPAC Message* Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Unsurprisingly, the cryptocurrency exchange platform Coinbase will be the first WeWork member to use that method of payment. WeWork will process the funds using the platform BitPay.In recent weeks, several other real estate companies have announced a newfound acceptance of cryptocurrency. Rick Caruso’s eponymous real estate firm announced that it will begin accepting rent payments in Bitcoin across its retail and commercial properties.Real estate investor Kent Swig recently secured $6 billion in gold reserves to back his new cryptocurrency, DIGau.[CO] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Email Address* Share via Shortlink Tags Commercial Real EstateCryptocurrencyWeWorklast_img read more

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Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria from geothermal environments in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago, with the proposal of Bacillus fumarioli sp. nov

first_imgAerobic endospore-forming bacteria were isolated from soils taken from active fumaroles on Mount Rittmann and Mount Melbourne in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and from active and inactive fumaroles on Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago. The Mt Rittmann and Mt Melbourne soils yielded a dominant, moderately thermophilic and acidophilic, aerobic endospore-former growing at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C, and further strains of the same organism were isolated from a cold, dead fumarole at Clinker Gulch, Candlemas Island. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis, SDS-PAGE and routine phenotypic tests show that the Candlemas Island isolates are not distinguishable from the Mt Rittmann strains, although the two sites are 5600 km apart, and 16S rDNA sequence comparisons and DNA relatedness data support the proposal of a new species, Bacillus fumarioli, the type strain of which is LMG 17489T.last_img read more

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NATO kicks off new operation Sea Guardian

first_img NATO kicks off new operation Sea Guardian Authorities November 9, 2016 View post tag: Sea Guardian Back to overview,Home naval-today NATO kicks off new operation Sea Guardian center_img View post tag: NATO Three NATO ships and two submarines began a new NATO maritime security operation in the Mediterranean Sea on Wednesday.Italian frigate ITS Aviere, Bulgarian frigate BGS Verni, Turkish frigate TCG Gemlik, Greek submarine HS Papanikolis and the Spanish submarine ESPS Mistral – will conduct the first patrols in the central Mediterranean under the new operation named Sea Guardian.Air support to operation Sea Guardian will include rotational patrols by maritime patrol aircraft (MPAs) from Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece and Turkey.According to NATO, these first patrols will run through the 17th Nov 2016, with other patrols on the forge and to occur according with approved schedule of operations.At the Warsaw Summit in July, NATO announced the transformation of operation Active Endeavour into this new operation in response to the evolving security environment. Operation Sea Guardian has a broader scope adapted to a wider range of maritime security threats.The operation has three core missions: maritime situational awareness, counter-terrorism and capacity building. NATO said additional tasks could be added if decided by the allies, including upholding freedom of navigation, conducting interdiction tasks, countering proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and protection of critical infrastructure. Share this articlelast_img read more

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Launch of first Cornish pasty festival

first_imgOne of Cornwall’s greatest bakery exports is being celebrated this month with its first dedicated UK festival.Taking place on 21-23 September in Redruth, the Cornish Pasty Festival will celebrate the traditional bakery snack, which gained Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status last February, under European Union law.Festival organisers have said the event will welcome seven representatives from Mexico, who host similar pasty celebrations on an annual occasion, highlighting Redruth’s twinned-town links with Real del Monte, an area located in the Central American country and also known as Little Cornwall.The festival will also combine two existing events, Miners’ Day on 21 September and Pasty Day the following day, in which Cornish bakers will host a street market in Redruth town centre and invite locals to sample products.Lee Dunkley, town development manager for Redruth Town Council, told the West Briton newspaper: “Redruth’s Miners’ Day and Memorial Day have continued to remind us of our mining heritage along with the part the town played during the booming mining heyday. We believe that the Cornish Pasty Festival will become an annual event attracting locals and visitors to the town centre, making this an extended cultural weekend for all the family.”last_img read more

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Slimy secrets

first_imgBy rethinking what happens on the surface of things, engineers at Harvard University have discovered that Bacillus subtilis biofilm colonies exhibit an unmatched ability to repel a wide range of liquids — and even vapors.Centimeters across yet only hundreds of microns thick, such slimy bacterial coatings cling to the surfaces of everything from pipes to teeth and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial agents. The researchers now suspect they know the secret to a biofilm’s resiliency.Published in the Jan. 5 early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study holds promise for both creating bio-inspired nonwetting materials and developing better ways to eliminate harmful biofilms that can clog pipes, contaminate food production and water supply systems, and lead to infections.“By looking at biofilms from a materials perspective rather than a cellular or biochemical one, we discovered that they have a remarkable ability to resist wetting to an extent never seen before in nature,” says lead author Alex Epstein, a graduate student at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). “In fact the biofilm literally resisted our initial efforts to study it.”The finding came about serendipitously, as the original intention of the researchers was to study the structure of the biofilm. To image the interior of the biofilm, the team had to soak it with liquids such as ethanol and acetone, which normally spread and seep easily into a surface.“But to our surprise, it was impossible. The liquids kept beading up on the surface and wouldn’t infiltrate the colonies,” says Epstein, who is a member of the laboratory of Joanna Aizenberg, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at SEAS, Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute, and a core member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.As the Aizenberg lab studies materials and wetting, the engineers immediately recognized the significance of what they were observing. It turns out that biofilm has an unprecedented liquid-repellent surface, thereby revealing a critical clue to what may be responsible for its broad antimicrobial resistance.Nature offers numerous examples of water-resistant surfaces, such as the lotus leaf, a longstanding inspiration for creating synthetic materials. Until now, however, no model natural systems have been found for broadly repellent materials.While such surfaces can be manufactured, the top-down process is costly, labor intensive, and reliant on toxic chemicals and brittle structures. A biofilm, however, is living proof that only the simplest and most natural of components are required—namely, a resilient meshwork made from proteins and polysaccharides assembled into a multiscale, hierarchical structure.At the same time, the finding offers a new perspective on how biofilms are immune to so many different types of biocides. Even the most sophisticated biochemical strategy will be ineffective if a biocide cannot enter the slime to reach the bacteria. In short, the antimicrobial activity of alcohols and other solvents becomes compromised by the strongly nonwetting behavior at clinically relevant concentrations.The team expects that their newfound knowledge will help alert researchers to the need to consider this requirement when designing ways to destroy harmful biofilms.“Their notorious resistance to a broad range of biocide chemistries has remained a mysterious and pressing problem despite two decades of biofilm research,” says Aizenberg, a pioneer in the field of biomimicry. “By looking at it as a macroscopic problem, we found an explanation that was just slightly out of view: antimicrobials can be ineffective simply by being a nonwetting liquid that cannot penetrate into the biofilm and access subsurface cells.”Aizenberg and her colleagues speculate that such strong liquid repellence may have evolved in response to the bacteria’s natural soil environment where water can leach heavy metals and other toxins.Moreover, the property may underlie the recent success of the use of biofilm as an eco-friendly form of biocontrol for agriculture, protecting plant roots from water-borne pathogens.Looking ahead, the Harvard team plans to investigate precisely how the biochemical components of biofilms give rise to their exceptional resistance and to test the properties of other bacterial species.“The applications are exciting, but we are equally thrilled that our findings have revealed a previously undocumented phenomenon about biofilms,” says Aizenberg. “The research should be an inspiring reminder that we have only scratched the surface of how things really work.”Just as with biofilm, she adds, “It has been a challenge to get deep into the core of the problem.”Epstein and Aizenberg’s co-authors included Boaz Pokroy, a former postdoctoral fellow in Aizenberg’s group and now a faculty member at Technion (the Israel Institute of Technology), and Agnese Seminara, a postdoctoral fellow at SEAS and participant in the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard University.The research was funded by the BASF Advanced Research Initiative at Harvard.last_img read more

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