WeWork will accept Bitcoin for membership fees

first_imgWeWork CEO Sandeep Mathrani. (Getty, WeWork)WeWork will begin to accept cryptocurrency, including Bitcoin and Ethereum, as a form of payment for its workspaces.The company announced Tuesday that customers can use the currency to pay for memberships; it will then use the cryptocurrency to pay its landlords and other vendors whenever possible, the Commercial Observer reported.“WeWork has always been at the forefront of innovative technologies, finding new ways to support our members,” CEO Sandeep Mathrani said in a statement to the publication. “It only makes sense for us to expand on the optionality we provide by adding cryptocurrency as an accepted form of payment for our members.”ADVERTISEMENTRead moreKent Swig launches his own cryptocurrencyBig on Bitcoin: Caruso now largest real estate firm to accept rent in cryptocurrencyWeWork in talks to go public via SPAC Message* Full Name* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Unsurprisingly, the cryptocurrency exchange platform Coinbase will be the first WeWork member to use that method of payment. WeWork will process the funds using the platform BitPay.In recent weeks, several other real estate companies have announced a newfound acceptance of cryptocurrency. Rick Caruso’s eponymous real estate firm announced that it will begin accepting rent payments in Bitcoin across its retail and commercial properties.Real estate investor Kent Swig recently secured $6 billion in gold reserves to back his new cryptocurrency, DIGau.[CO] — Sasha JonesContact Sasha Jones Email Address* Share via Shortlink Tags Commercial Real EstateCryptocurrencyWeWorklast_img read more

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Aerobic endospore-forming bacteria from geothermal environments in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago, with the proposal of Bacillus fumarioli sp. nov

first_imgAerobic endospore-forming bacteria were isolated from soils taken from active fumaroles on Mount Rittmann and Mount Melbourne in northern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and from active and inactive fumaroles on Candlemas Island, South Sandwich archipelago. The Mt Rittmann and Mt Melbourne soils yielded a dominant, moderately thermophilic and acidophilic, aerobic endospore-former growing at pH 5.5 and 50 degrees C, and further strains of the same organism were isolated from a cold, dead fumarole at Clinker Gulch, Candlemas Island. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis, SDS-PAGE and routine phenotypic tests show that the Candlemas Island isolates are not distinguishable from the Mt Rittmann strains, although the two sites are 5600 km apart, and 16S rDNA sequence comparisons and DNA relatedness data support the proposal of a new species, Bacillus fumarioli, the type strain of which is LMG 17489T.last_img read more

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NATO kicks off new operation Sea Guardian

first_img NATO kicks off new operation Sea Guardian Authorities November 9, 2016 View post tag: Sea Guardian Back to overview,Home naval-today NATO kicks off new operation Sea Guardian center_img View post tag: NATO Three NATO ships and two submarines began a new NATO maritime security operation in the Mediterranean Sea on Wednesday.Italian frigate ITS Aviere, Bulgarian frigate BGS Verni, Turkish frigate TCG Gemlik, Greek submarine HS Papanikolis and the Spanish submarine ESPS Mistral – will conduct the first patrols in the central Mediterranean under the new operation named Sea Guardian.Air support to operation Sea Guardian will include rotational patrols by maritime patrol aircraft (MPAs) from Portugal, Spain, Italy, Greece and Turkey.According to NATO, these first patrols will run through the 17th Nov 2016, with other patrols on the forge and to occur according with approved schedule of operations.At the Warsaw Summit in July, NATO announced the transformation of operation Active Endeavour into this new operation in response to the evolving security environment. Operation Sea Guardian has a broader scope adapted to a wider range of maritime security threats.The operation has three core missions: maritime situational awareness, counter-terrorism and capacity building. NATO said additional tasks could be added if decided by the allies, including upholding freedom of navigation, conducting interdiction tasks, countering proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and protection of critical infrastructure. Share this articlelast_img read more

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Launch of first Cornish pasty festival

first_imgOne of Cornwall’s greatest bakery exports is being celebrated this month with its first dedicated UK festival.Taking place on 21-23 September in Redruth, the Cornish Pasty Festival will celebrate the traditional bakery snack, which gained Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) status last February, under European Union law.Festival organisers have said the event will welcome seven representatives from Mexico, who host similar pasty celebrations on an annual occasion, highlighting Redruth’s twinned-town links with Real del Monte, an area located in the Central American country and also known as Little Cornwall.The festival will also combine two existing events, Miners’ Day on 21 September and Pasty Day the following day, in which Cornish bakers will host a street market in Redruth town centre and invite locals to sample products.Lee Dunkley, town development manager for Redruth Town Council, told the West Briton newspaper: “Redruth’s Miners’ Day and Memorial Day have continued to remind us of our mining heritage along with the part the town played during the booming mining heyday. We believe that the Cornish Pasty Festival will become an annual event attracting locals and visitors to the town centre, making this an extended cultural weekend for all the family.”last_img read more

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Slimy secrets

first_imgBy rethinking what happens on the surface of things, engineers at Harvard University have discovered that Bacillus subtilis biofilm colonies exhibit an unmatched ability to repel a wide range of liquids — and even vapors.Centimeters across yet only hundreds of microns thick, such slimy bacterial coatings cling to the surfaces of everything from pipes to teeth and are notoriously resistant to antimicrobial agents. The researchers now suspect they know the secret to a biofilm’s resiliency.Published in the Jan. 5 early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), the study holds promise for both creating bio-inspired nonwetting materials and developing better ways to eliminate harmful biofilms that can clog pipes, contaminate food production and water supply systems, and lead to infections.“By looking at biofilms from a materials perspective rather than a cellular or biochemical one, we discovered that they have a remarkable ability to resist wetting to an extent never seen before in nature,” says lead author Alex Epstein, a graduate student at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS). “In fact the biofilm literally resisted our initial efforts to study it.”The finding came about serendipitously, as the original intention of the researchers was to study the structure of the biofilm. To image the interior of the biofilm, the team had to soak it with liquids such as ethanol and acetone, which normally spread and seep easily into a surface.“But to our surprise, it was impossible. The liquids kept beading up on the surface and wouldn’t infiltrate the colonies,” says Epstein, who is a member of the laboratory of Joanna Aizenberg, Amy Smith Berylson Professor of Materials Science at SEAS, Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute, and a core member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard.As the Aizenberg lab studies materials and wetting, the engineers immediately recognized the significance of what they were observing. It turns out that biofilm has an unprecedented liquid-repellent surface, thereby revealing a critical clue to what may be responsible for its broad antimicrobial resistance.Nature offers numerous examples of water-resistant surfaces, such as the lotus leaf, a longstanding inspiration for creating synthetic materials. Until now, however, no model natural systems have been found for broadly repellent materials.While such surfaces can be manufactured, the top-down process is costly, labor intensive, and reliant on toxic chemicals and brittle structures. A biofilm, however, is living proof that only the simplest and most natural of components are required—namely, a resilient meshwork made from proteins and polysaccharides assembled into a multiscale, hierarchical structure.At the same time, the finding offers a new perspective on how biofilms are immune to so many different types of biocides. Even the most sophisticated biochemical strategy will be ineffective if a biocide cannot enter the slime to reach the bacteria. In short, the antimicrobial activity of alcohols and other solvents becomes compromised by the strongly nonwetting behavior at clinically relevant concentrations.The team expects that their newfound knowledge will help alert researchers to the need to consider this requirement when designing ways to destroy harmful biofilms.“Their notorious resistance to a broad range of biocide chemistries has remained a mysterious and pressing problem despite two decades of biofilm research,” says Aizenberg, a pioneer in the field of biomimicry. “By looking at it as a macroscopic problem, we found an explanation that was just slightly out of view: antimicrobials can be ineffective simply by being a nonwetting liquid that cannot penetrate into the biofilm and access subsurface cells.”Aizenberg and her colleagues speculate that such strong liquid repellence may have evolved in response to the bacteria’s natural soil environment where water can leach heavy metals and other toxins.Moreover, the property may underlie the recent success of the use of biofilm as an eco-friendly form of biocontrol for agriculture, protecting plant roots from water-borne pathogens.Looking ahead, the Harvard team plans to investigate precisely how the biochemical components of biofilms give rise to their exceptional resistance and to test the properties of other bacterial species.“The applications are exciting, but we are equally thrilled that our findings have revealed a previously undocumented phenomenon about biofilms,” says Aizenberg. “The research should be an inspiring reminder that we have only scratched the surface of how things really work.”Just as with biofilm, she adds, “It has been a challenge to get deep into the core of the problem.”Epstein and Aizenberg’s co-authors included Boaz Pokroy, a former postdoctoral fellow in Aizenberg’s group and now a faculty member at Technion (the Israel Institute of Technology), and Agnese Seminara, a postdoctoral fellow at SEAS and participant in the Kavli Institute for Bionano Science and Technology at Harvard University.The research was funded by the BASF Advanced Research Initiative at Harvard.last_img read more

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‘Dazzling’ fall fellows invade Shorenstein Center

first_imgThe Joan Shorenstein Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, located at Harvard Kennedy School, has announced its fall fellows.“This semester’s group of fellows is truly dazzling, with superb people at the cutting edge of politics, journalism, and scholarship — and with Vivek Kundra — perhaps the top person in the nation to illuminate where all these disciplines meet digital technology,” said Alex S. Jones, director of the Shorenstein Center.Neal Gabler, Vivek Kundra, Renee Loth, Frederick “Fritz” Mayer, Gina Glantz, and Mark McKinnon will spend the semester researching and writing a paper, and interacting with students and members of the Harvard community.Read full biographies of the fellows.last_img read more

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Warren Alpert Foundation honors 5 pioneers in cancer immunology

first_imgThe 2017 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize has been awarded to five scientists for transformative discoveries in the field of cancer immunology.Collectively, their work has elucidated foundational mechanisms in cancer’s ability to evade immune recognition and, in doing so, has profoundly altered the understanding of disease development and treatment. Their discoveries have led to the development of effective immune therapies for several types of cancer.The 2017 award recipients are:James Allison, professor of immunology and chair of the Department of Immunology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterLieping Chen, United Technologies Corporation Professor in Cancer Research and professor of immunobiology, of dermatology and of medicine, Yale UniversityGordon Freeman, professor of medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical SchoolTasuku Honjo, professor of immunology and genomic medicine, Kyoto UniversityArlene Sharpe, the George Fabyan Professor of Comparative Pathology, Harvard Medical SchoolThe honorees will share a $500,000 prize and will be recognized at a day-long symposium on Oct. 5 at Harvard Medical School.The Warren Alpert Foundation, in association with Harvard Medical School, honors trailblazing scientists whose work has led to the understanding, prevention, treatment or cure of human disease. The award recognizes seminal discoveries that hold the promise to change our understanding of disease or our ability to treat it.“The discoveries honored by the Warren Alpert Foundation over the years are remarkable in their scope and potential,” said George Q. Daley, dean of Harvard Medical School. “The work of this year’s recipients is nothing short of breathtaking in its profound impact on medicine. These discoveries have reshaped our understanding of the body’s response to cancer and propelled our ability to treat several forms of this recalcitrant disease.”The Warren Alpert Foundation Prize is given internationally. To date, the foundation has awarded nearly $4 million to 59 scientists. Since the award’s inception, eight honorees have also received a Nobel Prize. Read Full Storylast_img read more

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Notre Dame provost to step down next July

first_imgUniversity provost Thomas Burish will step down July 1, the administration announced in a press release Aug. 1. The date marks the end of Burish’s third five-year term in the position.As provost, Burish is charge of all academic operations at Notre Dame, placing him at the head of all colleges, schools and institutes, as well as admissions, financial aid and advising. Provost is the second highest-ranking administrative role at Notre Dame, behind only University president.During his 14 years at Notre Dame, Burish has expanded the University’s academic offerings, with a particular focus on its research and graduate programs, the release said.From 2006 to 2017, investment in research rose from $79 million to $212 million. Likewise, investment in graduate studies “more than doubled,” helping fund 15 new programs. According to the release, this growth has contributed to a 25% increase in Graduate School applications.Need-based aid has also grown from $60 million to $154 million under Burish. The student body has become more diverse, as well — the number of undergraduates who are either international students or students of color has risen from less than a quarter to more than a third.In addition, Burish’s tenure saw the establishment of the Harper Cancer Research Institute in partnership with Indiana University-South Bend, as well as the creation of Innovation Park. The University also underwent a series of efforts to expand its global reach with the creation of Notre Dame International in 2010 and the Keough School of Global Affairs in 2014. Global Gateways were opened in Beijing, Dublin, Jerusalem, London and Rome, as well.The release named the Inspired Leadership Initiative, an academic program for retirees, as another notable achievement under Burish. The program graduated its first class in May.Board of Trustees chairman John Brennan said Burish was instrumental to a number of University initiatives during his time at Notre Dame.“It is difficult to overstate the positive impact Tom has had on our University as provost,”  Brennan said in the release. “For nearly 15 years, he has guided the strategy and investments that enhanced our faculty and strengthened our scholarship to the great benefit of our undergraduate and graduate students, created new research programs and partnerships and significantly advanced Notre Dame’s academic reputation among the nation’s leading universities.”As provost, Burish has helped make the University’s mission manifest, Jenkins said.“Words cannot adequately express my gratitude and respect for Tom’s outstanding leadership, his visionary leadership of the academy, his commitment to our Catholic mission and his tireless efforts to make Notre Dame a truly great and truly distinctive university,” he said in the release. “Tom has been a transformative provost for Notre Dame, and for 15 years an invaluable colleague. He and his wife Pam have become dear friends. We have all benefited tremendously from his intellect, judgment, determination and selfless devotion to Notre Dame and its mission.”Originally from Peshtigo, Wisconsin, Bush graduated summa cum laude from Notre Dame in 1972. Before returning to the University, he served as provost at Vanderbilt for 10 years and as the president of Washington and Lee University for three.In the release, Burish extended his gratitude for the opportunity to serve the University.“It has been a great joy and privilege to return to my alma mater as provost and to be a part of Notre Dame’s distinctive excellence as a Catholic research university,” he said. “I have been honored to work with and learn from Father John and the Trustees, and with faculty, staff and administrative colleagues who have displayed ever-rising standards of service and excellence. And it has been a labor of love to work with students whose inspiring talent and principled goals constantly renew my hope in the future. In a career filled with countless blessings, serving the Notre Dame family is a gift which has given great meaning to my life.”According to the release, the University will soon launch an international search for Burish’s replacement. A committee, chaired by Jenkins, will create a pool of potential candidates. The committee will feature faculty members and a student representative from the Academic Council.The committee will recommend a candidate to the Board of Trustees, which will then make a final selection.A version of this story was published Aug. 1.Tags: Charles and Jill Fischer Provost, provost, Thomas Burishlast_img read more

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A new day for Florida’s trial courts

first_imgA new day for Florida’s trial courts August 1, 2004 Managing Editor Regular News A new day for Florida’s trial courts Recounting the struggle to establish the framework and obtain funding Mark D. Killian Managing Editor Court officials who labored long and hard during the regular and special legislative sessions of 2003 left Tallahassee that summer “absolutely believing” that they would never get adequate funding for Revision 7 to Art. V when the state took over trial court funding the following year.“We truly believed that short of a miracle, the trial courts would be going backward on July 1, 2004, certainly not forward, and they might not even stay the same,” Judge Susan Schaeffer, who chaired the Trial Court Budget Commission, told those gathered at the Supreme Court July 1 to mark the occasion.But thanks to the hard work of legislators, the state’s judges, court administrators, The Florida Bar, the governor, Florida’s business community, and others, the tide turned. When July 1 of this year finally came, Schaeffer said confidently that all Florida citizens now have access to the same essential trial court services no matter where they live.“This is what the citizens of Florida voted for when they passed Revision 7 to Art. V of Florida’s Constitution in 1998,” Schaeffer said, and what the entire court system worked so hard to achieve.Immediate past Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead said the implementation of Revision 7 was the judicial system’s greatest challenge since the state’s modern trial court system was created in the 1970s and proclaimed the effort was Florida’s judges’ “finest hour.”“It is the first time that [the judges] had to rise in the defense of the entire branch. . . they put aside their differences. . . they approached this issue with great passion,” Anstead said. “We have seen the strength when we stand together.”Schaeffer said when the final conference was over, and the compromises reached, the TCBC had:• Asked for 241.5 employees for court administration; and got 241.5 employees for court administration.• Asked for 212.5 case managers; and got 212.5 case managers.• Asked for 237.5 masters, hearing officers, and secretarial staff; and got 231.5 masters, hearing officers, and secretarial staff. •Asked for146.5 mediation employees; and got 117 employees, which was still 27 more employees than the counties were funding under the previous funding system.• Asked for 260.5 court reporters; and got 260.5 court reporters.• Asked for 102 court interpreters; and got 102 court interpreters.• Asked for 14 expert witness employees; and got 14 expert witness employees.“The [Office of the State Courts Administrator] said they needed 18.5 employees to take care of their extra responsibilities due to Revision 7, and they got 18.5 new employees,” Schaeffer said.In all, the courts received $22 million in expense dollars for the total budget.“We believed when we left the 2003 legislative session that we needed a miracle in 2004 to make Revision 7 work,” Schaeffer said. “As you can see, we got that miracle.”Justice Barbara Pariente said when she realized she would be taking over as chief justice on July 1, she felt a great deal of anxiety knowing it was the same day the new funding scheme would kick in.“I kept on thinking, ‘Is this going to be what Y2K did not turn out to be — a disaster?’” Pariente said. Thanks to the collective effort of everybody who toiled to make the funding transition work, a strong base is now provided that “we can now build on and make better and better for all of our citizens.”“So we stand here today together — the Bar and the Bench — to commemorate Revision 7, on this the first day of July, 2004,” Immediate Past Bar President Miles McGrane said. “It has been a successful sojourn, and the Bar is now ready to go the distance.” On January 12, 1999, Chief Justice Major Harding established what was eventually a 15-person group, called the Article V Funding Steering Committee. One of its first tasks was to inventory all of the costs the counties were presently spending, and to determine what part of those costs should become part of the state budget. Schaeffer said when the Steering Committee saw the inventory, it was the first time that judges had seen all the staffing, equipment, and programs that the other circuits had, or didn’t have.“Believe me, it was a real eye-opener,” Schaeffer said. “Some circuits had day care services provided by court employees in the courthouse; judges in one circuit had their own personal bailiffs; judges in another had two judicial assistants per judge; one circuit paid for judges’ Bar dues; another paid for judges’ robes; and another paid to have the judges’ robes dry cleaned. Some circuits were in the business of doing urinalysis testing for drug cases and even paternity cases. One even had a program for the homeless. These were the circuits we dubbed the ‘haves.’”Sadly, Judge Schaeffer said, other circuits were dubbed the “have nots” where the judges literally had to pay for their own pens.“Judge Stan Blake from Miami regularly presented Judy Pittman, chief judge of the 14th Circuit, one of the ‘have not’ circuits, all the pens he could gather up from the circuit judges conferences,” Schaeffer said.The “have not” circuits had little court administration — most of it was provided by employees of the county. The ‘have nots’ had never seen a general master. They had no meaningful case managers. They had few mediation programs.At the end of the day, Schaeffer said, the TCBC said no to day care services, personal bailiffs, more than one judicial assistant per judge, to paying Bar dues, to buying robes, and dry cleaning.“We said no to the court being involved in drug and paternity testing,” Schaeffer said. “We said while the homeless were a definite problem in every community, the courts should not be in the homeless business. We said yes to pens that don’t leak. We said yes to court administration, case managers, general masters, and child support hearing officers, and mediation.”Those elements became known as the “equity elements,” and for Revision 7 to be successful, all circuits would need an appropriate amount of employees and dollars for each of those elements, she said.In 2000, then Chief Justice Charles Wells traveled to every circuit in the state to rally the state’s judges to become involved.“Unfortunately, the message was boring,” Schaeffer said. “I remember telling Justice Wells and Ken Palmer [former state courts administrator] on more than one occasion that the message, good though it was, was the best sleep medicine money could buy. Even a visit from Chief Justice Wells could not stir up the trial judges to really care about Revision 7.”Schaeffer said the judges seemed to believe that the third branch of government would be well taken care of by the other two branches, if for no other reason than they were the third branch of government.In 2003, they were in for a rude awakening.Schaeffer said up until 2003, the legislature had done very little to deal with Revision 7. She recalled having lunch in Orlando with Judge Belvin Perry and then House Speaker Tom Feeney in 2002.“We asked Mr. Feeney if it wasn’t time to get going on Revision 7. His answer, ‘Not on my watch,’” Schaeffer said. “President [John] MacKay must have felt the same way. So while Revision 7 was actually supposed to be phased in over six years, that never happened.”Therefore, Schaeffer said, Revision 7 was to be on President Jim King’s and Speaker Johnnie Byrd’s watch, “whether they wanted it or not.”The 2003 legislative session was the TCBC’s first full indoctrination into a legislative session.“In our first year in Tallahassee, full-time during the session, we were, for the most part, rank amateurs when it came to lobbying.”Schaeffer said getting the legislature to agree to fund the elements the TCBC considered crucial was difficult, to say the least.“The legislators thought we didn’t need court administration — the clerk of court could provide whatever court administration we needed,” Schaeffer said. “They thought the OSCA was unnecessary — the Justice Administrative Commission could surely provide whatever services OSCA provided to the trial courts. They didn’t want to believe that we needed masters and hearing officers — they thought everyone who came to court should see a judge.”Schaeffer also said many in the legislature believed that case managers were only for specialty courts, which they had determined, except for drug court, they were not going to fund.“Fortunately, cooler heads eventually prevailed,” Schaeffer said. “Case managers, although the last element to be added, were finally included as an element of the trial courts in a compromise Revision 7 bill between the House and Senate.”the the time the 2003 special legislative sessions were over, the lawmakers had passed HB 113-A, which Schaeffer called a good Revision 7 bill that identified all of the equity elements the TCBC had proposed for state funding.“However, we had been beaten to death on our budget for that year,” Schaeffer said. “The FY 2003-04 trial court budget was a definite failure.”While Schaeffer said she could not pinpoint exactly what turned the tide the following spring, she shared some of her thoughts as to why the courts ultimately succeeded:• “Maybe I got the trial judges out of their slumber mode when I threatened all of them in a speech at both the county and circuit judges’ plenary sessions that if they did certain things, or didn’t do other things during the 2004 legislative session, I would hunt them down and strangle them.” Schaeffer commented that one judge who heard her speech evaluated it by remarking, “I just don’t think it is right for one judge to threaten to strangle another judge. I am afraid of you.”“Maybe it was fear that got the rank-and-file trial judges working harder for the cause in 2004,” she joked, adding “that was a good day.”• Chief Justice Anstead worked tirelessly for the trial courts, visiting editorial boards in both 2003 and 2004 to get the trial courts’ message to the people.• Maybe it was because the Bar got really involved in 2004. “I think the leaders of the Bar fully understood that the Bar could be mortally wounded if the trial courts were underfunded,” she said.• Maybe it was because the business community became heavily involved in 2004, finally realizing that an underfunded court system would delay their business cases most of all.“Associated Industries of Florida actually offered their very able lobbyists, and $15 million from the workers’ compensation trust fund to help the trial courts get adequate funding,” Schaeffer said. “That caused some legislative heads to turn, I can tell you.”• Maybe the Tax Watch Report caused the legislature to sit up and take notice that the courts needed more funding.• Maybe it was because the TCBC, the conferences, the chief judges, and the rank-and-file judges spoke with one voice, and didn’t go off in different directions in 2004.“Whatever the reason or reasons, the governor gave us a good start in his budget; the Senate improved on the governor’s budget; and the House improved on the Senate’s budget,” Schaeffer said.All in all, Schaeffer said, when the 2004 legislative session was over, the citizens who had voted for Revision 7 had what they voted for — adequate state funding for essential trial court services for every citizen no matter where they lived.“There are no more ‘have not’ courts — they are all ‘haves,’” Schaeffer said. “Revision 7 is fully implemented, and implemented well. We have justice for all Floridians.” The Road to Revision 7last_img read more

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Trump orders NAFCU-backed regulatory relief for economic recovery

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr President Donald Trump Tuesday signed an executive order requiring agencies to take measures to eliminate, modify, waive, or exempt burdensome regulatory requirements in efforts to help support economic recovery from the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. NAFCU has continuously advocated for regulatory relief for credit unions as they work to meet the needs of their members affected by the pandemic.The order includes independent agencies, such as the NCUA, CFPB and Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), and encourages agencies to speed up the rulemaking process by moving some proposed rulemakings to interim final rules with immediate effect.The order also directs agencies to take additional steps to provide coronavirus pandemic-related relief, practice enforcement discretion, and provide a report on their efforts to the Office of Management and Budget and others in the administration.Additionally, the order establishes a “Regulatory Bill of Rights,” 10 basic principles of fairness that will govern the administrative enforcement and adjudication process.last_img read more

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