Saint Mary’s resident assistants create safe spaces posters for display in Le Mans Hall

first_imgA piece of white computer paper stands out amidst a sea of bright decorations taped to Saint Mary’s residence assistant (RA) Ivol Frasier’s door in Le Mans Hall, reading, “My room is hate free,” and “Please help me keep Le Mans Hall safe for everyone.” Stickers of the LGBTQ pride flag and transgender pride flag, as well as the accessibility and feminist movement symbols, surround the message. Similarly decorated posters are tacked to other doors in the hallway. Maeve Filbin | The Observer Ivol Frasier, a junior RA at Saint Mary’s whose door is pictured here, recently helped begin a campaign whereby Le Mans Hall residents display signs on their doors encouraging tolerance and acceptance of underrepresented groups. Frasier has been working in collaboration with fellow RA Dorothy Le.These posters were the result of a project led by Frasier, a junior RA, and other members of residence life.“My room is hate free,” she said. “And so it’s just kind of enforcing that this is a safe space for me and for everyone else.”RAs are asked to construct four programs exploring the core values of the College — learning, faith and spirituality, community and justice — over the course of the semester. Frasier said she and senior RA Dorothy Le decided to collaborate in a project highlighting diversity and justice in residence life.“We were thinking, ‘What are some ways that we can promote diversity and justice that hasn’t really been done before?’” Frasier said. “Because there have been projects with cupcakes and diversity and you just decorate your cupcakes and that doesn’t really work.”While scrolling through Pinterest boards, Frasier and Le found templates for dorm posters that read, “My room is hate free. Please help keep ____ Hall safe,” and were inspired to adapt them for their own project. They invited their residents to decorate the posters with stickers representing symbols of their own identity.“And so we just thought it’d be a great way to get the overall feel of Le Mans to feel a little more welcoming and inclusive because I know that for me, as a member of the LGBT community, I know that coming here, I was very scared and very afraid and didn’t know if I’d be able to find my people,” Frasier said. “So I think it’s really important to have that visibility of the people who are safe and that Saint Mary’s is safe. And so we’re like, ‘OK, door decs, that’s a great idea.’”The sticker sheets offered different designs with symbols for feminism, coexist and disability accessibility, Frasier said.“One of my favorites is this world that’s held up by hands of different colors,” she said. “And so we tried to just include as many different areas of diversity as we could in these sticker sheets. And [the residents] could just pick and choose which ones they wanted to use. And almost everyone who came picked one of everything, and I’m like, ‘Look at you guys, spread the love.’ I love it.”Frasier said she’s not exactly sure what a safe Le Mans Hall looks like, but hopes it would feel inclusive and accepting, while promoting the visibility of diverse populations on campus.“So making it known that there are people of color who live here, or LGBT students who live here and just — not necessarily going out of your way — but making it visible and known that you’re safe to be who you are here,” she said.At Saint Mary’s, a Catholic college with a predominantly white undergraduate enrollment, this inclusion has to be intentional, Frasier said.“At least for me coming in as someone who’s a little different, it’s like, ‘Oh, I don’t know if I’m going to be OK here’ to just kind of having that visibility and that awareness that other people are here,” she said. “They’re welcome here and they belong here.”As a psychology major, Frasier said she has studied the dynamics between an “in” group and an “out” group.“And so when you feel like you’re singled out or you feel like you’re different and everyone else sees you as different, you’re more likely to underperform,” Frasier said. “So it’s really important to celebrate and accept diverse populations, but then also let them know that that doesn’t define them. It’s really important to make sure that even though you are a little different than the stereotypical Belle, you still can be successful here and we see you and we support you.”The posters began as an invitation to heightened awareness, and have now started conversations about safe spaces on campus, Frasier said.“If you don’t know where a safe space is, you don’t know that it exists,” she said. “So even if it’s just another student or just a resident or just a friend, at least you know, you have that one place where you can go and celebrate yourself and be safe. And so even if you feel unsafe in the classroom, you know that you have one person you can go to and then I know having on my door I hope that it will bring people to me who feel unsafe or that they need help, so that I can direct them to resources and help them have a better college experience.”Junior KatieBeth Hollman, sitting beneath the bisexual pride flag hanging over her desk, said the posters encourage acceptance in Le Mans Hall.“I’m a member of the LGBT community … so personally, I like seeing all of the ‘Keep Le Mans Hall safe’ things because they’re really welcoming,” Hollman said. “And like I know a bunch of them have pride stickers on them, and so it kind of makes me feel welcome and makes me like not feel prejudiced against.”Hollman and her roommate Mary Blake tacked their versions of the sign to their door to project that same sense of welcome to others in the hall, Hollman said.“I put it on my door because I want other people to feel the same way,” she said. “So like if there’s someone else — and not even necessarily gay or bi or whatever — but even just like different beliefs or different mental illnesses or different disabilities, I want them to know that I’m supporting them, and that they aren’t being prejudiced against.”Frasier said she thinks Saint Mary’s has made a lot of pushes towards inclusion, and highlighted clubs such as the Black Student Association and Sexuality and Gender Alliance. However, the College could do more to promote these groups on campus and make sure they are receiving the proper resources, Frasier added.“But of course, there’s always room for improvement,” she said. “There’s always room for more.”Tags: Hate Free, Le Mans Hall, Residence Life, Resident Assistant, safe spaces, visibilitylast_img read more

Read More
Tix Now On Sale to See Vanessa Hudgens-Led Gigi on B’way

first_img Based on the 1944 novel by Colette, Gigi was first adapted for the Broadway stage in 1951 by Anita Loos, with an unknown Audrey Hepburn in the title role. Subsequently Alan Jay Lerner (screenplay and lyrics) and Frederick Loewe (music) adapted the material for the 1958 movie musical, winner of nine Academy Awards, including Best Picture. In 1973, the tuner played 103 performances on Broadway with Karin Wolfe as Gigi and Daniel Massey as Gaston, earning a Tony Award for Best Original Score. Related Shows Set during the turn of the 20th century, Gigi tells the story of a free-spirited teenage girl living in Paris who is groomed (in the custom of her family) to serve as a companion to a bored, wealthy playboy until the pair realize they have fallen in love. The show features the memorable tunes “Thank Heaven For Little Girls,” “I Remember It Well,” “The Night They Invented Champagne,” “It’s a Bore,” “Say a Prayer for Me Tonight” and more. Thank heaven! Tickets are now available to see the Vanessa Hudgens-led Gigi on the Great White Way. The tuner, which played a pre-Broadway engagement at the Kennedy Center, will begin previews on March 19 at the Neil Simon Theatre and officially open on April 8. The Eric Schaeffer-helmed production, adapted by Heidi Thomas, also stars Corey Cott, Howard McGillin, Steffanie Leigh, Victoria Clark and Dee Hoty. Check out Gigi’s stars talking about the revival in Broadway.com’s video below. The cast also includes Cameron Adams, Kathryn Boswell, Max Clayton, Madeleine Doherty, Ashley Blair Fitzgerald, Hannah Florence, Alison Jantzie, Brian Ogilvie, James Patterson, Justin Prescott, Jeffrey C. Sousa, Manny Stark, Tanairi Sade Vazquez, Richard White, Amos Wolff and Ashley Yeater. Show Closed This production ended its run on June 21, 2015 View Comments Gigilast_img read more

Read More
Study: New York State regulators are ignoring battery-storage trends

first_imgAcker said that the study had its merit in showing that there is an opportunity for energy storage to replace traditional peaker plants, even under 2013’s conservative load profile assumption.“We are at a point where energy storage can replace peakers in many, many situations. We want make sure that we do get this right, so that we’re able to really take advantage of the benefits of the storage technology,” Acker said.More: New York peaker study underestimates storage potential FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Utility Dive:The New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium (NY-BEST) on Friday submitted comments criticizing state regulators’ July 1 unit-by-unit peaker study, saying it underestimated how many peakers could be replaced by battery storage.The Department of Public Service’s study identified at least 275 MW of peaking units, or about 6% of the total rated capacity of New York’s peaking fleet, as potential candidates for replacement with six‐hour energy storage. This number increases to over 500 MW when using eight-hour duration storage.“There’s a lot of momentum right now for the replacement of large-scale assets on the grid with storage, and that’s why these studies are so important,” Bill Acker, executive director of NY-BEST, told Utility Dive.NY-BEST, a nonprofit trade association representing 175 member organizations, identified three major concerns with the methodology of the peakers study, according to its filing:The study ignores the temporal characteristics of traditional peakers that are more restrictive and less flexible than energy storage resources, and assumes that peaker operation is solely determined by system reliability needs;It is examining snapshots of individual units in isolation without a system model, or taking into account other operational factors at a given time, can create misleading results; And load shapes and peaking needs will change dramatically as renewable energy increases, making the Study’s use of 2013 data inappropriate to analyze future New York peaking needs. Study: New York State regulators are ignoring battery-storage trendslast_img read more

Read More
JNC Notices

first_img August 1, 2001 Regular News JNC Notices10th Circuit seeks judicial applicants The 10th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications to one new circuit judgeship and one new seat on the Polk County bench. Applicants must be registered voters, members of the Bar in good standing for the preceding five years and residents of the territorial jurisdiction of the court. Applications are available from Robert J. Antonello, JNC Chair, Post Office Box 7692, 240 Security Square, Winter Haven 33883-7692, phone (863) 294-2898, or from the Bar’s website. An original and nine copies of the completed application must be returned to Antonello no later than 5 p.m., August 23. Sixth Circuit seeks judicial applicants The Sixth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications for one circuit, one Pasco and one Pinellas County judgeship. Applicants must be registered voters, members of the Bar in good standing for the preceding five years and residents of the territorial jurisdiction of the court. Applications are available from Elise K. Winters, JNC Vice Chair, 600 Cleveland Street, Suite 940, Clearwater 33755. The completed application must be returned to Winters no later than 5 p.m., August 20. Ninth Circuit seeks judicial applicants The Ninth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications for one new circuit judge and one new Orange County judge position. Applicants must have been members of the Bar for the preceding five years, registered voters, and reside in the territorial jurisdiction of the court. Applications are available here, and will be available at the office of The Florida Bar, 1200 Edgewater Drive, Orlando 32804-6314; from the Office of Court Administrator, Orange County Courthouse, at 425 North Orange Avenue, Orlando; at the Office of Court Administration, 1 Courthouse Square, 6th Floor, Kissimmee 34741; and at the office of Mary S. Townsend, JNC Chair, 520 Emmett Street, Kissimmee 34741, telephone (407) 846-2500 The original application and nine copies must be received by Townsend’s Office by noon August 20. 11th Circuit seeks judicial applicants The 11th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications for a newly created judgeship on the circuit bench. Applicants must be residents of Dade County, registered voters, and have been members of the Bar in good standing for the preceeding five years. Application forms may be picked up at the offices of H.T. Smith, JNC chair, 1017 N.W. 9th Court, Miami 33136. Applicants should note that this JNC requires certain information not contained in the application form available on The Florida Bar’s website. An original and nine copies of the completed application and the applicant’s e-mail address for notification purposes must be received by Smith no later than 5 p.m., August 13. 12th Circuit seeks judicial applicants The 12th Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications to fill a seat on the Sarasota County bench, which was recently created by the legislature. Applicants must be registered voters, have been members of the Bar in good standing for the preceding five years, and reside in Sarasota County. Applications are available at the offices of James H. Burgess, Jr., JNC chair, 1776 Ringling Blvd., Sarasota 34236, telephone (941) 366-3700; Roger L. Young, 1800 Second Street, Suite 819, Sarasota 34236, telephone (941) 906-1980; or Robert J. DeBoer, 227 Nokomis Avenue South, Venice 34284, (941)485-1571. Applications also can be downloaded from the Bar’s website. Ten copies of the completed application must be received by Burgess no later than 5 p.m. August 17. 20th Circuit JNC to fill two judgeships Applicants are being sought for two judicial positions, one on the Circuit Court for the 20th Judicial Circuit and one on the Lee County Court. Applicants must be registered voters, members of the Bar in good standing for the preceeding five years and residents of the territorial jurisdiction of the court. Application forms may be obtained by calling Edward K. Cheffy, JNC chair, at (941) 261-9300 or writing him at Cheffy Passidomo Wilson & Johnson, 821 Fifth Avenue South, Suite 201, Naples 34102. Each applicant must return 10 copies of the completed application by August 27. Interviews with the JNC will be conducted during the first week of September. Seventh Circuit seeks judicial applicants The Seventh Judicial Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is accepting applications for a new circuit judgeship created by the legislature earlier this year. Applicants must be registered voters, a member of The Florida Bar for the previous five years, and live within the Seventh Circuit. Applications are available from JNC Chair Charles Tindell, 406 North Wild Olive Ave., Daytona Beach 32118-3938, phone (386)258-1930, or on the Bar’s website. Applications must be submitted no later than 4 p.m. August 31. The new judge will take office January 2. Fourth Circuit seeks judicial applicants The Fourth Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications for two new judgeships, one on the circuit bench and one on the Duval County bench. Applicants must reside within the territorial jurisdiction of the court, be registered voters, and have been members of the Bar in good standing for the preceding five years. Applications are available from Joshua A. Whitman, JNC chair, The Butler Pointe Building, 4500 Salisbury Rd., Suite 340, Jacksonville 32216, telephone (904) 996-1111. The original and 10 copies of the completed application must be returned to Whitman no later than noon August 31. Second Circuit JNC to fill two judgeships The Second Circuit Judicial Nominating Commission is now accepting applications to fill two newly created seats on the Second Circuit bench. Applicants must be registered voters, must have been members of The Florida Bar in good standing for the preceding five years, and must reside in the territorial jurisdiction of the Second Circuit. Applications are available at the offices of Mary L. Sweet, JNC Vice-Chair, 1024 East Park Avenue, Tallahassee 32301 and at the Bar’s website. The original and nine copies of the completed application must be received by Sweet no later than 5 p.m., Friday August 10. Workers’ comp. deputy chief needed The Statewide Nominating Commission for Judges of Compensation Claims is now accepting applications for the position of deputy chief judge of worker compensation claims. Pursuant to Chapter 200l-91, Laws of Florida, the current term of the chief judge expires October 1, and effective October 1, the position of deputy chief judge of compensation claims is created. Candidates desiring consideration for the position must demonstrate prior administrative experience and possess the same qualifications for appointment as a judge of compensation claims. No person may be nominated unless he or she has been a member of The Florida Bar in good standing for the previous five years and is experienced in the practice of law of workers’ compensation. Qualified applicants must submit the original completed application and one copy to G. Bart Billbrough, commission chair, 1390 Brickell Avenue, Third Floor, Miami, FL 33131, telephone (305) 350-5358, fax (305) 373-2294, and one additional copy must be submitted to each commission member by 5 p.m. August 7. Applications may be obtained from the commission chair. A public hearing will be held August 21, commencing at 9:30 a.m., at the Marriott Orlando World Center, 8701 World Center Drive in Orlando, for the purpose of conducting interviews of the applicants for this position. Written commentary concerning any applicant by any person is welcome and must be submitted to the chair and a copy to each commission member no later than August 16. Names and addresses of commission members are also available from the chair. Applicants sought for comp. claims JNC vacancy The Board of Governors is seeking applicants for the following vacancy to be filled during its August 23, 2001 meeting: Statewide Nominating Commission for Compensation Claims Judges: One attorney from the territorial jurisdiction of the Secomd DCA to serve a four-year term commencing immediately. All applicants must have been admitted to The Florida Bar at least five years prior to application. No attorney who appears before any judge of compensation claims more than four times a year is eligible to serve on the statewide nominating commission. Commissioners are also not eligible for state judicial vacancies filled by the JNC on which they sit for two years following the expiration of their terms. Commissioners are also subject to Florida financial disclosure laws. Partners and associates of Board of Governors members are not eligible to apply. Persons interested in applying for the JNC vacancy should contact The Florida Bar at (850) 561-5600, ext. 6802, to obtain the proper application form. Applications may also be obtained by writing the Executive Director, The Florida Bar, 651 E. Jefferson Street, Tallahassee 32399-2300. Completed applications must be received no later than the close of business August 10. Resumes will not be accepted in lieu of the required application. JNC Noticeslast_img read more

Read More
Pariente wages battle against breast cancer

first_img Pariente wages battle against breast cancer Associate EditorFlorida Supreme Court Justice Barbara Pariente has never been the shy type, a legal dynamo quizzing lawyers with a barrage of questions during oral arguments.But when 54-year-old Pariente joined her colleagues during oral arguments October 7, she communicated plenty without saying a word.Taking her place at the polished bench next to other justices, she donned her familiar black robe — and exposed her unfamiliar bald head.In Pariente’s very public job, flinging off her wig was a visible declaration to the world that she is fighting breast cancer and there’s no reason to feel ashamed.Chemotherapy may have temporarily robbed Pariente of her brunette hair, but it hasn’t taken away her spirited will to live.During Pariente’s courtroom debut sans wig, there was a Supreme Court ceremony to induct new members to The Florida Bar. In his speech, Bar President Miles McGrane made references to heroes in the law, Atticus Finch and Chesterfield Smith, and then with a nod to Justice Pariente, he added that on this day she was his hero, too.“He said something about standing up for your personal cause, and I was very touched by that,” Justice Pariente said.“The main thing is I’m not going to go out and tell other people how to live their life. But I’m here to tell you that not only is there life after breast cancer, but there is life during breast cancer.”While she has been dealing with the shocking diagnosis since March, she only recently concluded there is nothing to hide. Actually, she said, she wasn’t intending to hide her cancer, but she wanted to keep it low-key while ensuring she could continue with her work while concentrating her energy on her treatment regimen, as well. Seven months after her diagnosis, that time had come to go public with her cancer fight.“I told one of the justices today that by the end of oral argument I felt like I was in this altered state, but I was very comfortable. Women don’t know how lucky men are without hair,” Justice Pariente said October 10, sounding upbeat.“People told me I had a cute head. And the first person to say that was my husband (Fourth District Court of Appeal Judge Fred Hazouri). He has just been wonderful.”With support from family, friends, and what she calls “my court family,” she is fighting for her life with everything she has — and her arsenal includes strength from those she loves.“You don’t go through these types of battles by yourself. No matter who you are, you can’t do it without family and friends and colleagues at work. It’s been really gratifying to have all those special people to be there, when it’s tough, not just in the good times,” Pariente said.“When you are a patient, in a selfish way, no matter what anyone says, you feel like a victim. Anyone who’s sat in a doctor’s office and heard those words knows what I’m talking about.”When she was ready to ditch the hot and distracting wig, she said she did it for “the right reasons: It’s personally comfortable and to let women feel it was a choice for them.”Another choice Pariente has made is to try to have a positive attitude about a scary disease.“We can’t go through life without being touched by adversity. Looking at people I really admire, I realized you either give into it or you face it and realize that your life can go on,” Pariente said. “Once I understood it, I was determined to do everything I could to battle it. I always heard about the mind-body connection. And it’s important to get control of it and have a positive attitude about it.”When she first heard the diagnosis in March, that dreaded c-word left her feeling “totally shocked.”“Certainly, somebody my age grew up at a time, back in the ’60s when breast cancer, or any type of cancer, was a death sentence. Secondly, having cancer involving that part of the body, that is a shock,” Pariente said.“It was something I always feared, but I had no history in my family. I watched what I ate. I exercised regularly. And I felt like I’d done everything in my life to minimize the risk. The shock was the initial feeling.”Following the advice of doctors, Pariente has had yearly mammograms since she was 40, advice she urges other women to follow. A routine mammogram in March revealed calcium-like deposits called “cluster micro-calcifications” that showed up on X-rays but were undetected by touch. A biopsy concluded she had the most common kind of noninvasive breast cancer called ductal carcinoma in situ.At first, doctors thought it could be controlled with a lumpectomy and six weeks of radiation. But that treatment plan proved overly optimistic. After the lumpectomy procedure, a small amount of cancer was present in her lymph node. She ended up going through a second lumpectomy, but a mastectomy was eventually required on one side, and then she chose to also do a mastectomy on the other side.“I wanted as much information as possible. As you can imagine, I have files of research and consulted with many, many doctors,” Pariente said.“What women faced with this diagnosis don’t realize is that doctors want to put the treatment options back with the woman. They want to give you that control, but there is a lot of uncertainty. I didn’t really think about what treatment would follow the mastectomy until June. After a lot of research and consulting, I elected for the more aggressive chemotherapy. And it was a difficult decision.”Every two weeks, Pariente has received high dosages of cancer-fighting drugs.“I was concerned I’d be extremely fatigued and have a lot of side effects. But having been through three-fourths of it—six of the eight treatments—I really found I was able to carry on my normal activities.“It’s not the way I worked and exercised or lived before March, but I’ve been pleasantly surprised,” she said. “I was planning for the worst. One of the questions I was asked by a doctor, is when you think of risk of reoccurrence, you want to be satisfied you did everything you can do to optimize long-term survival. And I feel like I’ve done that.”Along the way, she kept working at her demanding job. But she was grateful for the flexibility the job affords. She took full advantage of the court’s summer break, and while she usually is a sociable fixture at the Bar’s Annual Meeting, this year she was noticeably absent as she underwent the mastectomy.Being able to keep working on cases and opinions since March has helped bind her shattered routine together into a sense of normalcy. And she is glad she didn’t miss any oral arguments.But while she strove for normalcy, she also is working on changing things for the better.“I think I have a calmer view about events,” Justice Pariente said. “Among my friends, they know I am the ultimate planner. It’s my lifestyle.”Now, she said she is “much more understanding that you don’t have to plan every minute of your life.” She is limiting personal appearances on her once-crowded agenda and learning to live more spontaneously and go with the flow.“Trivial things that get us upset don’t seem to matter. Someone said you know things are back to normal when everything makes you upset. I do think you end up with a sense of appreciation of what is truly important. I like to think I have always had that appreciation, but definitely there has been that heightened perspective.”Instead of a vigorous exercise workout wedged into a rigorous day, Justice Pariente is learning how to relax with yoga. She takes deep breaths. She pauses longer to reflect. She writes her insights in a journal.And she tries to do what her friends tell her: “Slow down and take time for yourself.” Pariente wages battle against breast cancer November 1, 2003 Jan Pudlow Associate Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

Read More
Salt Festival in Ston, the oldest saltworks in Europe

first_imgThe oldest European saltworks, the one in Ston, will host the first Salt Festival from 27 August to 2 September, where visitors will be able to enjoy creative workshops, a fair of craftsmen from Ston, Pelješac and the Dubrovnik littoral, lectures and music evenings.The idea of ​​creating a festival in the Ston area was prompted by the story of salt and the Republic of Dubrovnik, which based its progress, among other things, on the production and trade of this important spice and article in human nutrition. The Ston saltworks, unchanged since the 14th century, was a strategic economic point of the Republic of Dubrovnik, while today it is an important economic entity and a unique cultural monument and tourist attraction, according to the Ston Tourist Board. “We planned to start this event last year, but due to a combination of various circumstances, we are only starting this year with the Salt Festival. This year, the Association Amoreta from Dubrovnik accepted this idea and started the realization of the event, which we believe will interest visitors. We have a few more shows in September. From September 7 to 10 is now the traditional, Kionookus Film Food Festival. We also have a part of the Baroque Festival that is held in Korcula every year. This year, part of their program will be held on September 10 in the newly renovated tower “Kaštio” and it will be performed by the Vocal Ensemble Antiphonus, which performs music by Claudio Monteverdi. The tenth StonWallmarathon will be held on September 24.9.2017, XNUMX. and is part of this year’s program of events organized or co-organized by TZO Ston”, Says Marijana Franušić from the Ston Tourist Board.On the first day, jazz lovers will enjoy jazz performances by Maja Grgić and Igor Vlahinić, the second day is dedicated to Marin Držić, who was employed as a clerk in the Solana in Ston in 1553, the third is Olive Oil Day, and the fourth is Honey Day. . It is the fifth day of the fair with a music program and continues with the Day of Ston shells and a rich music program.This year, Ston records an increase in tourists, so this year until August 20, 24 guests visited the sights of Ston, which is 976 percent more than last year, and in the same period there were 14 overnight stays or 136 percent more than 925. Marijana Franušić from EU funds, but the Municipality is responsible for that, which launched the project “History on a grain of salt” and successfully completed it. “TZO Ston is one of the partners in this project through which we will try our best to use the funds to promote Ston and the values ​​that Ston has ”, concluded Marijana Franušić.The sun, sea, wind and man still combine today to produce extraordinary ecological salt and salt flower, and about 2000 tons of salt are produced annually in the saltworks. A story about the tradition, way and culture of living, which is certainly the motive for coming and an authentic story that we must tell our guests.last_img read more

Read More
Wolf Administration: Allegiant Travel Company Creates 50 New Jobs, Increases Travel Options for Lehigh Valley

first_imgWolf Administration: Allegiant Travel Company Creates 50 New Jobs, Increases Travel Options for Lehigh Valley SHARE Email Facebook Twitter September 13, 2019center_img Press Release,  Workforce Development Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced that airline provider Allegiant Travel Company has been approved for state funding to expand its presence at the Lehigh Valley Airport in Hanover Township, Lehigh County, by establishing a base, creating 50 new full-time jobs.“This project is good news for Allegiant and the Lehigh Valley Airport, good news for travelers, and good news for the Lehigh Valley,” said Gov. Wolf. “It will provide the community with more jobs and more travel options while injecting more revenue into the local economy, and the sky’s the limit on new opportunities for the area.”The funding, provided under the Job Creation Tax Credit (JCTC) program, will enable Allegiant to base two Airbus A320 airplanes at the Lehigh Valley Airport, increasing the number of daily flights. The $50,000 in JCTC credits will allow Allegiant to hire pilots, flight attendants, and mechanics, and to purchase ground support equipment to accommodate increased flights. The company will hire 50 additional employees to staff the base and new routes that will be flown from the Lehigh Valley Airport.“Lehigh Valley is a perfect location for a permanent base, which will further establish Allegiant as a hometown airline in eastern Pennsylvania,” said Keith Hansen, vice president of government affairs for Allegiant. “It has been a great area for Allegiant, where passenger demand has grown steadily over the years. As a base airport, having locally-based aircraft and crews will give us a host of options for both new service and expanded operational hours. This will mean more opportunities for affordable, convenient travel for local residents, and visitors to the area.”“Excitement is sky high throughout the Lehigh Valley with the news of an Allegiant Crew Base landing at ABE,” said Thomas R. Stoudt, Executive Director, Lehigh-Northampton Airport Authority. “Since day one, Allegiant has demonstrated a strong commitment by providing air travelers affordable options and also have supported impactful regional initiatives. Now, they’ve created employment opportunities for this region which makes your neighborhood airport a more critical economic asset.”Allegiant began operating at Lehigh Valley Airport in 2005 and currently offers seven non-stop routes to Fort Lauderdale, Orlando/Sanford, St. Pete-Clearwater and Punta Gorda, Florida; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Nashville, Tennessee and Savannah, Georgia. Allegiant currently carries more than 280,000 annual passengers through Lehigh Valley.For more information about DCED, visit www.dced.pa.gov.last_img read more

Read More
Netherlands roundup: More funds seek consolidation opportunities

first_imgThe Dutch pension fund of US chemicals giant Chemours plans to transfer its pension rights for its participants to a general pension fund (APF) and an insurer.The €1bn scheme had previously decided that it wanted to move its pensions provision after following affiliated company DePont Nederland outsourced pensions for its 400 employees to Belgium.At 2018-end, Pensioenfonds Chemours had 3,400 participants, 500 of whom were workers. This was down from 900 before DuPont staff were transferred.Since the pension fund closed its average salary plan to new entrants in 2013, new employees have accrued defined contribution (DC) pensions. Low-cost DC vehicle Be Frank has been Chemours’ provider since 1 January, although the transfer of assets has yet to be completed. According to Frans Dorsten, the scheme’s chair, the decision to transfer employees’ pensions to an APF was based on the fact that this participant group had almost been fully compensated for inflation.However, deferred members and pensioners, whose pension rights were to be outsourced to an insurer, had incurred significant indexation in arrears as different rules applied to them, Dorsten said.Placing their pension rights with an insurer would make it easier to compensate for the indexation shortfall, the chairman said.Last March, the funding level of Pensioenfonds Chemours stood at 125%.Dorsten said that the transfer of the pension assets was scheduled for this year. He added that the board was still in discussions with all parties involved, and was still waiting for quotes.The scheme’s current pensions provider is Inadmin RiskCo, while asset management has been outsourced to BlackRock and Pimco.L&G’s pension fund eyes liquidationScildon, the €60m Dutch pension fund of financial services giant Legal & General (L&G), is to liquidate if its sponsor forces through a plan to switch to a DC plan.On its website, the scheme said it wouldn’t have a future if the employer picked another provider for DC arrangements.The pension fund’s accountability body has responded positively to the sponsor’s plan.According to the board, the employer wanted to make a decision in May and would to consult the scheme’s 180 active participants in June.At the end of March, the pension fund’s coverage ratio stood at 112.2%.last_img read more

Read More
Question unanswered at celebrations

first_img Sir Alex Ferguson confirmed on Sunday that Rooney had submitted a transfer request, although added that it had been turned down. Speaking to MUTV, Rooney did not answer directly a question about what the retiring Ferguson had done for him, and was not asked whether he would be staying or not. “He has been brilliant for us all,” said Rooney. “He is a great manager. He is a winner and to do it for so long is incredible. He is a fantastic manager and a fantastic person.” Press Association Manchester United declared they had “got their trophy back” at the end of the Premier League title-winning parade – but there was no word on whether Wayne Rooney will still be around for the start of their defence. center_img Rooney received a mixed reception when he boarded the open-top bus at Old Trafford for the start of the parade, although he did play an active part in the celebrations as it made its slow way along the route into the centre of Manchester, where huge numbers of United fans turned out to acclaim their team. With 20,000 fans packed into Sir Matt Busby Way, roads had to be closed prior to the Red Devils’ departure. And whilst there was space along the main route into the city centre, once the bus headed down the main shopping area, Deansgate, supporters found a variety of vantage points to see the team drive past. Rio Ferdinand and Ashley Young, who at times ditched the crutches he is supposed to be using to nurse an ankle injury that has ended his season, led the singing, with Ferguson also joining in. There was a moment of humour, as defender Jonny Evans was asked by MUTV interviewer Helen McConnell, who also happens to be his fiancee, whether he was going to have a good summer. “Yes,” replied Evans. “I am getting married, to you Helen.” But mainly, with the heavy rain that poured down just a couple of hours before the parade began, it was just a celebration of United’s 20th title. It is Ferguson’s 13th, and last of course. But the revelry was not enough to make the Scot think standing down in favour of David Moyes, who is also believed to have been in Manchester to witness the scenes, was a wrong move. “You always think about it (whether you are doing the right thing). But I think it is the right time. I really do,” said Ferguson, who also challenged his players to repeat the title hat-trick they last achieved between 2007 and 2009. “We have a young squad, with a lot of good young players, who are going to get better. The big test is to win it three times in a row.” last_img read more

Read More
Florida man reportedly lures police to apartment to shoot them

first_imgA Florida man is now behind bars after he reportedly lured police officers to his apartment by filing a false report then began shooting at them as they investigated the incident.The incident occurred Tuesday at an apartment on Northwest 85th Court in Doral.Authorities 34-year-old Sergio Van Kanten contacted them claiming that six men broke into his apartment.When authorities arrived, they heard several gunshots coming from inside of the apartment, and broke down the door fearing for the safety of any who may have been in the apartment. That’s when Van Kanten turned the gun on them:“Fearing for the safety and welfare of anyone who might be in the apartment, the officers conducted a forced entry and kicked down the door, at which time additional gunshots were fired in the direction of the door,” Rey Valdes of the Doral Police Department said in a news release.The SWAT team was called to the area and after several hours of negotiation, Van Kanten surrendered to police.During a police interview Van Kanten told officers that he filed the false report. He also admitted to shooting at a police cruiser that was parked outside of the apartment in April.He has since been arrested and is now facing charges of three counts of attempted murder on a law enforcement officer and one count each of discharging a firearm in public and use of a firearm during the commission of a felony.last_img read more

Read More