Edwards to undergo surgery

first_imgLONDON (CMC):Ex-West Indies speedster, Fidel Edwards, will undergo surgery today to deal with a broken ankle sustained here last week during a freak accident.The right-armer, who was expected to spearhead Hampshire’s attack in the English County Championship which bowled off earlier this month, broke his ankle while playing football in warm-ups ahead of the final day’s play against Yorkshire last Wednesday.He was attempting to kick the ball when his foot got stuck in the turf, causing him to fall over in pain.”Unfortunately Fidel has had a serious break and will have to undergo surgery on Tuesday,” Giles White, Hampshire’s director of cricket said.”It’s a real shame for him, he has been unbelievable since he has been with us and has become an extremely popular member of the club.”We will support him through his recovery and look forward to having him back in a Hampshire shirt as soon as possible. He is a class act and the team will miss him.”The 34-year-old Edwards was brilliant for the club in just a handful of matches towards the end of last season, snaring an amazing 45 wickets.Hampshire on Monday announced that Edwards’ former Windies teammate, Tino Best, would be brought in as cover.last_img read more

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Clutch Fonacier shoots NLEX past San Miguel

first_imgNLEX 103 – Fuller 26, Quiñahan 17, Fonacier 16, Mallari 10, Tiongson 8, Alas 7, Soyud 7, Baguio 5, J. Villanueva 3, Lastimosa 2, Al-Hussaini 2, Taulava 0.SAN MIGUEL 100 – McKines 28, Lassiter 19, Santos 19, Cabagnot 19, Fajardo 6, Ross 4, Ganuelas-Rosser 2, Espinas 2, Heruela 1, Tubid 0.Quarters: 25-24, 48-39, 68-70, 103-100.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Facing a four-point lead in the final minute, Alex Cabagnot didn’t want the game to slip away from San Miguel, banging a corner three in the last five seconds of the game.The window remained open for the Beermen after Alex Mallari muffed his freebies, but Fonacier and Fuller stifled Cabagnot’s last-second jumper to preserve the victory.Wendell McKines topped San Miguel with 28 points, 14 rebounds, and six assists, while Cabagnot, Marcio Lassiter, and Arwind Santos all had 19 markers apiece in the loss.NLEX broke the game open early, 25-10, but San Miguel kept coming back before the Road Warriors finally took the driver’s seat late in the third quarter, 70-68, setting up the nip-and-tuck battle to the finish.The scores:ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ ‘Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance PLAY LIST 01:30’Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance00:50Trending Articles04:31Suu Kyi appeals to ICJ not to impose int’l justice01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite Hotdog’s Dennis Garcia dies Police seize P68-M worth of ‘shabu’ in Pasay National Historical team rescues Amorsolos, artifacts from Taal Marcosian mode: Duterte threatens to arrest water execs ‘one night’ Yap, Rain or Shine finally beat Star Search on for 5 Indonesians snatched anew in Lahad Datu LATEST STORIES Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to give up royal titles Larry Fonacier. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netLarry Fonacier drilled the two clutch 3-pointers in the last two minutes to help NLEX escape Grand Slam-seeking San Miguel Beer, 103-100, in the 2017 PBA Governors’ Cup Sunday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.The veteran marksman drained the go-ahead triple with 1:46 to play and followed it up with another three from the top of the key to put the Road Warriors up, 101-97, with 23.9 left.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. “Larry is vintage from eight years ago. He’s playing well for us, not only the leadership but also the scoring,” said NLEX head coach Yeng Guiao.Fonacier unleashed eight of his 16 points in the fourth period as he went 4-of-5 from beyond the arc, on top of four rebounds and three assists.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’Aaron Fuller led NLEX with 26 markers, 22 boards, two steals, and two blocks, while JR Quiñahan got 17 points, 10 rebounds, and one assist — that being the tip that led to Fonacier’s backbreaking three-pointer.“It’s so hard to believe that we beat San Miguel in a tight game. We are developing some maturity and composure in the end game and it’s a good sign for us,” he said. “The more important thing is we got our sixth win which, in our calculation, makes us clinch a spot the quarterfinals.” Britain’s Prince Harry and Meghan Markle to give up royal titles Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Bishop Baylon encourages faithful in Albay to help Taal evacuees View commentslast_img read more

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UST rules UAAP Season 80 poomsae

first_imgCoco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Reyes, on the other hand, won the male individual event with 8.435 points, besting Ateneo’s Marvin Gabriel Vidal (8.270) and De La Salle’s McAvyngyr Alob (8.130).The two joined forces to earn the gold in the mixed pair after registering 8.395 points. De La Salle’s Angelica Gaw and Raphael Enrico Mella (8.250) finished in second while UP’s Janna Oliva and Jayboy Buenavista (8.235) came in third.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSBack on the throneThe Green Archers, who were the champions last season, settled for second overall with a 1 gold, 2 silvers and a bronze medal while Far Eastern University was the other podium finisher after bagging one gold and one bronze.Meanwhile, the men’s and women’s Taekwondo will begin on Wednesday, 9 a.m. at the same venue. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Herndon comfortable at Star: ‘I feel I belong here’ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’center_img Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? MOST READ LATEST STORIES It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson UNIVERSITY of Santo Tomas ruled UAAP poomsae once more.University of Santo Tomas banked on seniors Jocel Ninobla and Rodolfo Reyes to regain the title in the UAAP Season 80 poomsae competitions Tuesday at Blue Eagle Gym.Ninobla scored 8.250 points to rule the female individual category, edging Rinna Babanto of De La Salle and Patricia Jubelar of University of the Philippines, who registered an 8.165 and 8.115, respectively.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funnylast_img read more

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Dual Citizenship: Taxation and the Right to Vote

first_imgThe issue of dual citizenship has generated a lot of commentary and heat here in Liberia as well as in the Diaspora, especially in the United States. Those who support it are exercised about the righteousness of their cause. Their argument goes something like this. Commencing with the coup d’etat mounted by M/Sgt Samuel Doe and his 17 compadres in 1980, Liberians started leaving the country involuntarily in large numbers, fleeing persecution and political instability.The second wave came in 1985 in the wake of the abortive Quiwonkpa failed coup. The atrocities, especially those perpetrated against the Gio and Mano populations, have been amply documented in such books as “A Promise Betrayed” by Bill Berkeley of the Lawyers’ Committee on Human Rights.The civil war followed in 1989 and a third wave ensued, all the way through Octopus, April 6, 1996 and World War III in 2003. Those who were forced to leave Liberia to avoid slaughter, rape, maiming, displacement or such other horrors of war argue that they should not lose their right to Liberian citizenship because they opted to take citizenship of another country while they were in the Diaspora.  They feel that they should be entitled to recover their Liberian citizenship, along with all the rights and privileges that go with citizenship now that peace and harmony reign. They want to be dual citizens, i.e. citizens of Liberia and of the United States or whatever other country they have adopted as their new home. They want to have their cake and eat it too.Those opposed to the notion of dual citizenship are equally adamant that they don’t want people with one foot in Liberia and another foot elsewhere. Citing the case of Ellen Cockrum, they fear that dual citizens will commit crimes in Liberia, then hop on a Brussels Airlines flight to avoid prosecution. Emotions are raw.The issue of dual citizenship is a complex one. First, foreign citizenship is a matter of choice. A personal example will illustrate the point.I fled Liberia in 1986 because C-I-C Samuel Doe was after my hide. My dear friend Jim Holder, Ellen Sirleaf, my father Harry Sr., Tuan Wreh, Jackson Doe, Gabriel Kpolleh and a number of other political figures had been arrested and incarcerated in the aftermath of the Quiwonkpa debacle. Because they had not gotten up soooon in the morning, Doe and his henchmen did not get me. I was hiding right under their noses in Monrovia. But when my mother-in-law, Justine Nimley, asked her brother, G. Alvin Jones, what would happen to me if I turned myself in, the clip response was that “They would skin me alive”. Understandably, I was not brought out of my hiding place.Instead, I journeyed to the United States and applied for political asylum. If ever there was a person for whom the asylum laws of the United States were created, it was me. I had a “well founded fear of persecution”. So, when the time came and I became eligible for US citizenship I chose not to obtain US citizenship. I did so because I knew that eventually I would come back to Liberia and I didn’t want to lose my Liberian citizenship. My wife at the time and eldest daughter, both of whom were born in Liberia, chose to become US citizens. I settled instead for a Green Card.I lived in the United States for 16 years and missed out on a lot of the benefits of citizenship. But that was my choice. Life is like that. You make choices and you have to accept responsibility for the consequences of the choices you make. That goes for citizenship as it does for many other things. You cannot have your cake and eat it too.Proponents of dual citizenship focus on the benefits of citizenship but often forget about its obligations. One of the privileges of citizenship, which many proponents of dual citizenship are eyeing, is the right to vote in elections in Liberia. But if you do not live here and consequently have to live with the consequences of the choices you make at election time, is it fair for you to be given the right to vote here?Another of the obligations of citizenship is supporting the cost of government through taxation. Under American law, a US citizen must pay taxes on their income wherever it is earned. Would dual citizens accept to pay taxes in Liberia as well as in, say, the United States even though they may not live in Liberia? If the answer is no, then how would they be contributing to upkeep of the government in Liberia in the way that those living in Liberia do?The writer is a businessman. He can be reached at hagreaves49@gmail.com. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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The Need for an Arts Institute in Liberia

first_img“We should recognize the role of creative and expressive culture in nationalintegration or reintegration, national reconciliation and national unity. Literature, poetry, music, dances, paintings, plays, folktales, proverbs and parables are all critical assets in nation building.”-Dr. D. Elwood Dunn, speaking as national orator during Liberia’s 165th Independence day celebrations in 2012.In a bid to showcase Liberia’s rich cultural heritage through visual arts, I opened the Art of The Heart Galley on November 24, 2008, a move that would later give birth to the Liberia Visual Arts (LIVARTS) Academy on September 6, 2010. LIVARTS is doing fairly well today having successfully graduated hundreds of students over the past four years; some of them are now giving artistic services to other organizations. Thanks to supports from several embassies in Monrovia as well as a number of international Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) working in the country, we have managed to sustain our operations.Despite this support and our existing partnerships, there is a need to raise more awareness among Liberians to see art as an honorable career that can contribute immensely to national development and encourage private sector entrepreneurship. More concrete, visible steps need to be taken by Liberian artists to provide this impetus.The art gallery was a good step where works by some of the country’s fine artists were showcased for sale and exhibitions were mounted that featured these artists. Hardly a week went by without an international visitor walking into the gallery and purchasing a piece, or without a call (or email) asking for a collaboration. One such collaborations came in 2009 when the gallery was approached by the World Bank in Washington DC to coordinate Liberian artists in order for Liberian artwork to be represented at the “Africa Now!” art exhibition. Today, LIVARTS is on that same path. From June to August 2014, during the height of the Ebola epidemic, the academy collaborated with the Benetton Foundation in Italy. This collaboration led to the publication of a book on contemporary art in Liberia and Sierra Leone following an intense four-day workshop for practicing artists along with students of LIVARTS. Moataz Safty, an Egyptian artist who is the curator for the Benetton Foundation, made it a priority for Liberia to be included in the publication titled: “Contemporary Arts from Liberia and Sierra Leone – The Everyday Struggle”. Besides collaborations with institutions, individual collaborations from abroad are also on the rise. I am inclined to believe this base will go a long way if we now begin to put in place the rightful mechanisms.Many great painters, sculptors, writers, poets, musicians, dancers and dance troupes, have come and gone from the Liberian art scene. Today we continue to enjoy the works of these artists be it R. van Richards’ relief mural panels adorning the Edward J. Roye building on Ashmun Street; the tragic love story of Tenneh and Gotokai; Zack and Gebah’s warning song about a civil war that would eventually erupt and go on for fourteen years; the Liberian ‘V’ ring that was never patented; or the etching of agricultural produce on a dollar coin used in the country in the 70s and 80s, etc. Many of these artists were self-taught while others took the time to develop their talents at formal art institutions. While these artists are remembered today by many, the state remains rather aloof to the tremendous positive impacts they have on the life of the nation. That was then. Today, there are hundreds, if not thousands of talented Liberians of all ages in all disciplines of the arts, from fine art to music, theatre and craft-making in all of our fifteen counties from Cape Mount to Cape Palmas. Why is it then that our national leaders are not interested in the arts, to the extent that the subject no longer exists in our national school curriculum? Up coming artists in Liberia need to be assured that art is a noble career. They need not only believe but know that they can make a decent living from art, as is done in other countries. Art has to be institutionalized in Liberia. This is the only way cultural centers like famous Kendeja will not be traded for a multi-star hotel in the name of ‘development’ in the future.In July of 2012, the national orator for Liberia’s 165th independence day celebrations, Dr. D. Elwood Dunn, an internationally acclaimed scholar, historian and author, underscored the need for a National Arts Council to be established in the country. Despite all efforts by leading artists and art organizations, that finally drafted submitted a a very comprehensive proposal under the guidance of Dr. Dunn on the establishment of such art council with hundreds of signatures of Liberian artists and art promoters at home and abroad, that effort received nothing but lip service from our national leaders. Only the University of Liberia (UL) offers art as an elective to students and the art department is headed by a non-Liberian who is bending over backwards to keep the program alive. In a country where more than fifteen different newspapers appear on the newsstands daily, only one has a weekly column highlighting local Art and Culture (thanks to the paper you are reading). Why do Liberian stakeholders continue to understimate the role of the arts in national development?The main reason is because art, unlike law, medicine, politics, sociology, etc., is not institutionalized in the country. This is why there is a need for an art institute to be established in the country at this time. I have plans to open Liberia’s first art institute. It will offer all of the disciplines in the arts from fine art to dance, literature, music, performing arts, sculpture, etc. A number of our neighboring countries have art institutes which bring immense benefit to the people in those countries:Cote d’Ivoire, for example, has LINSAC, or the National Institute of Science, Art and Culture. Some of the graduates from LINSAC teach arts in the various high schools throughout the country as well as in other Francophone countries. Others work in government institutions such as museums as curators while a good number of these graduates take to full studio life, working and selling their works through local and international galleries. I know a sculptor in Abidjan who buys local woods and treats them for several months before setting out to start his carving. He would take another 4-6 months creating wood carvings representing different facets of the Ivorian culture. Once completed, he ships his art works to Europe where a gallery is waiting to exhibit them! A musician will travel from Cameroon or Congo to France or Belgium respectively with his or her dance troupe for a mega concert! Their works are celebrated both at home and abroad. Burkina Faso holds FESPACO — a biannual international film festival! Ghanaian artists are winning national and international awards around the clock, not to mention the huge gallery of Professor Ablade Glover which has been opened in the heart of Accra since 1993, a move that brought international attention to traditional and contemporary African art.What is the trick?The trick lies in the walls of reputable art institutes. It is time Liberians begin to support their children in art schools, see performances by art students, documentary films being made by art students, songs, books, etc., all by art students from a recognized art institute in the country that is fully equipped and staffed with qualified professors. Establishing such an institute is not a thing that can be done with the stroke of a pen. It will require research, resources, commitment, partnership, and collaboration with other art institutes around the globe. While it is a fact that not everyone coming from the walls of an art institute will become a full-time studio artist, the trainings and skills acquired at such institution will guide all graduates for a life time in any other filed they may wish to pursue from banking to medicine; from law, politics, to governance, etc. Kindly take 3 minutes to watch a recent video about our art academy on Youtube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVXR6PHdLBQ (July 2015) made by American documentary film maker Jim Tuttle.Feel free to contact us via email at: livartsacademy2010@gmail.com or visit the academy on 15th. Street & Payne Avenue in the compound of Alliance Francaise in Sinkor on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 2:00 – 5:00 PM.Thank you for your support and believing in our vision.About the author:Leslie Lumeh is the founder and Executive Director of the Liberia Visual Arts (LIVARTS) Academy. He holds a diploma in architectural drafting from the Booker Washington Institute (BWI). He was recently selected by the French based organization African Artists for Development (AAD) to represent Liberia among 54 other artists, each from an African country, featured in the “Lumieres d’Afrique” art exhibition slated for November 2015 in Paris. He is the resident cartoonist at the Daily Observer newspaper in Monrovia. Contact Leslie Lumeh via email at: leslie@leslielumeh.com Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Region 6 spent $2M in 7 days to transport children to Georgetown

first_imgThe Region Six Administration had reportedly spent $2 million in seven days to transport school children from the region to Georgetown for rehearsals and Independence Day flag-raising ceremony.This disclosure was made to the Region Six RDC by Zamal Hussain, a member of the Regional Tender Board (RTB), who explained that the Board was made aware of this huge sum spent only after the money had already been spent.A document seen by this publication indicated that two million and eighty thousand dollars ($2,080,000) was paid a particular person for transporting children from Berbice High School to Georgetown between May 17 and 24.The funds came from the Education Department’s budget, and were not budgeted for when the 2018 budget was prepared.Other spendingThe RTB’s Hussain said he enquired from the Regional Educational Officer about the spending, and was told that it is a policy of the Education Ministry to have Cadet Corps attend training in Georgetown for the Independence celebrations.“We at the Education Committee did not see anything in writing. I am puzzled to find out how we can get the Minister of Education to direct the Region to spend $2 million to hire buses to take students to Georgetown,” Hussain said.Regional Chairman David Armogan advised that the Education Minister should write the regional administration to justify the $2 million spending. “So that we know that it is done by an instruction of the Minister of Education, and not by discretion excised by anyone in the (Region 6) Administration.”Also commenting on the issue, Regional Vice Chairman Dennis De Roop questioned the process of hiring the buses. He noted that a large sum of money has been expended, and opined that even if the administration had to hire buses, the process should be transparent.“How many buses were hired, and what is the cost? A proper procurement transaction should have been carried out. They should have gotten quotations, and all that paperwork should have been done before the activity. You can’t utilise the buses and do the business and then after bring the documents to the Tender Board,” DeRoop noted.last_img read more

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Indoor soccer registration kicks off today

first_imgAs per usual, the league is also looking to fill various positions, such as referees and coaches.The league will also be looking to fill executive positions for the upcoming Annual General Meeting, which is to be held in October.For full details on the needed positions, any questions can be directed to the league’s official website or log onto the league’s Facebook page for up to date information.- Advertisement -Questions can also be directed to 250-787-KICK (5425).last_img

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School, LAPD deny mayor’s claim of gang war over turf

first_imgVillaraigosa’s staff said the mayor’s comments were based on information provided to them by Williams about the four local gangs. But 16-year-old students Albert Quintero and Martin Cabrera, who both attended Villaraigosa’s speech on Wednesday night, said they felt he overstated the threat. “This territory is not a gang territory,” Quintero said. “I don’t really know what gangs are trying to claim territory at this school, so I was surprised when he said that.” “I don’t normally see gangs around this area, so it’s not true,” added Cabrera. “Sure there are fights at the school, but it’s not gang-related. “It’s making the school look bad.” NORTH HOLLYWOOD – It was news to police, school administrators and students alike when Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa declared in his State of the City address that four gangs were fighting a turf war for East Valley High. At the six-month-old campus where Villaraigosa gave his speech Wednesday night, Assistant Principal Karen Williams said Thursday that four gangs operate in the neighborhood, but that none of their members attend the school. And Los Angeles Police Department Lt. Paul Vernon said there are actually three small gangs in the neighborhood and that some of the members attend East Valley High, but there’s no battle for them to “claim” the campus as their turf, as Villaraigosa said. “There isn’t a single school in the city of L.A. that any gang controls,” Vernon said. “This gang picture is typical of many neighborhoods that we deal with on a small scale.” As president of the 15-year-old Communities and Schools, Bobby Arias has been working with the mayor’s staff on gang intervention and prevention programs. He said his staff plans to meet today to discuss whether the problem near East Valley High is as severe as the mayor implied. “The worst thing we want to do is create hysteria,” Arias said. “I’m not prepared to say it’s not real, but it was news to me.” naush.boghossian@dailynews.com (818) 713-3722160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Dawson escapes punishment for Speroni challenge

first_img1 Craig Dawson West Brom defender Craig Dawson has avoided punishment for his challenge on Crystal Palace goalkeeper Julian Speroni after the Football Association’s disciplinary committee reviewed the incident.Dawson caught Speroni in the face with his elbow at a corner as Victor Anichebe headed home West Brom’s opening goal at The Hawthorns on Saturday.Speroni subsequently had to be replaced, with Palace boss Neil Warnock describing the challenge after the match as “almost an assault”.However, it was not deemed to be a red card offence and so Dawson was spared a retrospective sanction.Speroni watched on from the substitutes’ bench as Palace conceded a late penalty and Dawson’s Baggies earned a 2-2 draw, having been 2-0 down at half-time.last_img read more

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Everton manager Martinez angered by penalty decision in loss to Man City

first_imgEverton boss Roberto Martinez was left disappointed by a soft penalty decision which cost his side a share of the points against second place Manchester City.Toffees defender Phil Jagielka was penalised for a shoulder-to-shoulder challenge on James Milner after 23 minutes at Etihad Stadium but the decision by referee Andre Marriner was a questionable one.Yaya Toure stepped up to confidently slot home from the spot, securing a 1-0 win which closed the gap on Premier League leaders Chelsea to just three points.But Martinez believes it was the wrong call.“I am really disappointed about it,” said the Spaniard.“It is clear contact but contact is allowed. I don’t think it is a penalty at all.“James Milner’s reaction tells you everything. He just gets up and tries to fight for the ball. He is not even asking for a free-kick.“It is an action that happens a lot, two bodies fighting for the ball, a coming-together of two bodies.“If Phil Jagielka had tried to win the ball and collided with James Milner’s legs, that is always a penalty but shoulder to shoulder is just part of the game and should never be given.“It was a disappointing decision from such an experienced referee.”City took a physical approach throughout the game and Martinez felt City’s Eliaquim Mangala and Fernando were fortunate to escape red cards for high challenges on Samuel Eto’o and Gareth Barry respectively, with both players receiving only yellow.“I don’t like to see players sent off but when you have got a referee that is going to give a penalty for two bodies coming together – so you are going to use the letter of the law – Mangala’s challenge is a red card every single time,” The Everton boss said of the centre-back’s kung-fu style challenge.“His foot is high, his knee is high, in a very unnatural position. Samuel has got a really strong mark in his back. That is violent conduct, a very excessive force action, should have been a red card.“Fernando’s challenge is a bit more unfortunate but it is a high boot. If that high boot doesn’t touch the head of Gareth Barry it should be a yellow card. If it touched it I think it should have been a red card.“But you learn you are going to get bad decisions and lucky decisions coming your way.”last_img read more

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