The French League studies a common loan to help the clubs

first_imgThat decision can be a serious blow to the clubs, which in France receive 36% of their income in the first division from television broadcasting rights. Another threat comes from the fact that the transfer market may be severely affected by the slowdown. French clubs are traditionally vendors and they obtained a significant part of their income from this section. In the 2018-2019 season there were some 635 million euros in transfer surpluses, essential to balance their accounts, and according to the French financial control body, the clubs still need about 200 million euros until the end of the season to not end it in negative. Most of the clubs have resorted to partial unemployment mechanisms for their workforce or to salary reductions for their stars. But, even with these solutions, the coffers of the clubs must support up to 84% of the players’ net salary, not covered by the partial employment regulation files. The LFP is in negotiations with the soccer union to reduce wages 50% globally. The crisis is affecting most of the clubs, even the big ones.The main threatened is Olympique de Marseille, who already had red numbers before the arrival of the coronavirus and was in the spotlight of UEFA for that reason. Monaco, another of the greats, has put all its workers on technical unemployment and negotiates with the staff to reduce their wages. The club can benefit from the support of the Principality’s authorities and studies whether it can also receive help from the French State, since it plays in that league. The Paris Saint-Germain (PSG), for its part, despite having the largest budget, is also the one with the most losses linked to the pandemic. It is estimated that you can stop entering about 215 million euros. The French Professional Football League (LFP) is considering creating a community credit fund to help clubs overcome financial difficulties they may have due to the slowdown in competitions due to the COVID-19 pandemic. According to sources of the organization, it would be a credit of between 200 and 250 million euros that would be requested with the guarantee of future television income, both the current ones, from the BeIN Sports channel, and those of the following seasons, bought by the Spanish Mediapro. In this way, the aim is to allow entities to meet expenses during these months, when they have seen their income decrease due to the lack of ticket sales and all the benefits associated with the parties’ dispute. To this is added that Canal Plus has decided to freeze the payment of 110 million euros that it had to make on April 5, as it could not broadcast the games.last_img read more

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Match-winner Morris looking to reignite career

first_imgSubstitute Ricardo Morris was the difference between title aspirants and former champions Harbour View when both teams met in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) Monday night highlight game at the Harbour View Mini-Stadium. The win improved Portmore United’s tally to 40 points, two more than Arnett Gardens and sole leadership on the league. Morris, gifted enough to be invited to the Reggae Boyz squad as a 17-year-old – but has found himself out of the Portmore starting team – rose from the bench in the 60th minute to add the quality that was sadly lacking but for the flashes shown by the now lighter-hued Paul Wilson. After a number of moves, which failed to get the desired result, it came off for Morris in the 72nd minute as he collected a lovely pass, and dribbling at pace, he cut open the defence, rounded the goalkeeper, and steered home from a narrowing angle to light up the previously dull Harbour View atmosphere. ELATED PLAYER “I feel very happy knowing that I am the one who went on and gave my team the winnings,” the elated player said after the game. While not happy with the amount of time he has spent on the bench so far this season, Morris said that he was happy for the opportunity. “No, no no! The bench is not where I should be, but I am happy that I am in the squad because I had to go home to keep my daughter’s birthday party on Saturday, and I am very happy that I got even a minute this evening. This goal is dedicated to my daughter for sure. She turned four on Saturday,” said the man who starred for St James High School in the daCosta Cup competition alongside Allan Ottey and Fabian McCarthy. Morris opened the season with a double strike in a win over Montego Bay United and scored his third goal of the season a few games after that in a win over Waterhouse but had to wait until the 20th game of the season to get his fourth. “This is my fourth goal of the season. I scored two in the opening game and one against Waterhouse, which was about the fourth or fifth match of the season, but I have not played consistently since then. “I see myself trying to leave the country again to go overseas – anywhere. My desire is to play professionally abroad. I am always putting in the work, but no offers have come as yet, but I am confident it will come,” added the 23-year-old, who had a brief stint with the Tampa Bay Rowdies in 2014. “I am so happy that we are leading the league now. We just have to keep working hard to stay up there. What you will see from now on is me commanding a place in the starting 11,” he promised.last_img read more

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Ebola: The Unforgettable Story

first_imgWhat began as a single case of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) in Guinea, quickly spread to neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia. A small number of cases, mostly travel-associated, occurred in Nigeria, Senegal, Spain, Mali, and the United States. The outbreaks in Nigeria, Senegal, and Spain have been declared over.      In West Africa, a lack of healthcare services, governments weakened by decades of civil wars, and grossly inadequate infection prevention procedures and Personal Protective Equipments (PPE’s) have hampered efforts to contain/curb the spread of the disease. Citizens distrust of the government, misconceptions about how Ebola spreads, and in some cases, myths and misconceptions about the virus existence have prevented efforts to restrain the malady. Critical for health workers and community dwellers has been to isolate those who have come in contact with the virus.Every day and night, in hot, moist, and really difficult environments, healthcare and social workers performed critical tasks that saved lives and prevent further spread of the virus. For healthcare workers, using PPE’s is one source of discomfort and stress, let alone, being at a health post saving lives is petrifying and sometimes relatives, friends and contacts fear closer contacts whenever they (healthcare workers) are not in such risky environments. Stigmatization and discrimination of communities, families of dead Ebola victims, as well as Ebola survivors are pervasively high; thereby, posing serious challenge to government and partners in containing and decontaminating the outbreak of the virus.   While attention was being given these, shortage of more health facilities and workers, beds, supplies and land to carryout safe burial became international concern.  Patients were left to die in the streets because there was nowhere to put them and nobody to help them. Protest by some communities forbidding burial of Ebola victims in or near their environment, as well as, from families and relatives who felt their deceased members died of something else, other than Ebola, most times brewed conflicts. In Liberia, protest for the government to pay the few brave health workers their risk benefits for working during the height of the Ebola crisis amidst an economy crisis became a concern.As Ebola intensified, Liberia had to forgo most traditional practices (handshaking, hugging, kissing, washing the bodies of the dead ones, burial rites, etc). For example, it was painful for Liberians to see their loved ones being cremated as the usual burial rites – embalming, wake keeping, touching the body and putting the body in the grave – became associated with spreading Ebola rapidly.To-date, some 152 healthcare workers have been infected and 79 have died. When the outbreak began, Liberia had only 1 doctor treating nearly 100,000 people in a total population of 4.4 million people, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) factsheet of August, 2014. Every infection or death of a doctor or nurse significantly depleted the response capacity in Liberia.As of September, 2014, Liberia registered the highest deaths ever in world history, with regards to the EVD.  WHO, later reported on 8th September, 2014, that of all Ebola-affected countries, Liberia stood the most cumulative in figures of reported cases and recorded deaths, tolling  to nearly 2,000 reported cases and more than 1,000 recorded deaths. The case-fatality rate of Liberia stood at 58% (also among the highest-according to the WHO 2014 report). Just about the same time Liberia had lost several of its nurses and few doctors who were willing to stand in the gap of lifesaving duties.Trepidation loomed over the entire country, Africa and the World when WHO declared World Emergency to curb EVD. But hope came when U. S. President Barack Obama said at the UN General Assembly on 25th September, 2014: “Ebola is a horrific disease. It’s wiping out entire families. It has turned simple acts of love and comfort and kindness — like holding a sick friend’s hand, or embracing a dying child — into potentially fatal acts. If ever there were a public health emergency deserving an urgent, strong and coordinated international response, this is it.”Recognizing the heavy burden of the virus, countries worldwide scaled up personnel, equipment, financial and technical support to decimate Ebola in West Africa and stop its spread to other parts of the world.Although it was difficult to break its chain, today the story around its deadly manipulation has positively changed with people in the world, including health practitioners residing in Africa and Africa’s Oldest Republic, Liberia, now welcoming news that the country will soon be freed from the hands of the all-powerful, inhuman and deadly EVD, if Liberia maintains its status of reporting zero new cases of Ebola scourge.Liberia has made significant strides in response to EVD. On Thursday March 8, 2015, the nation released what was thought as her last diagnosed Ebola patient- Beatrice Yardolo – from a Chinese run-Ebola Treatment Unit (ETU). For Beatrice, three of her five children died from the virus before she became ill and was taken to the treatment center on February 18. The released of Beatrice, a 58-year old and class room teacher, in the words of many Liberians and health experts, marked a major milestone of the Africa-West Africa and partners’ response to the deadly Ebola virus.However, while all hopes were very high, following more than 10 days of no new cases reported, an outbreak of the virus in the Caldwell Community came to the fore and speculations are still being held over how Ruth Tugbeh, a 44-year old woman contracted the illness. Ruth is said to have contracted EVD from her boy friend that had earlier contacted the virus but survived the EVD. Unfortunately, efforts to restore her life did not materialize as of Friday, March 27, 2015. Since the last reported death, Liberia has gone more than 15 days without a new case.The WHO has announced that while the number of new patients in Liberia is declining, numbers are still fluctuating in both Guinea and Sierra Leone. A total of 30 confirmed cases of Ebola virus disease (EVD) were reported in the week to 5 April. This is the lowest weekly total since the third week of May 2014. Case incidence in Guinea decreased to 21, compared with 57 confirmed cases the previous week. Liberia reported no confirmed cases. Sierra Leone reported a fifth consecutive weekly decrease from 25 confirmed cases in the week to 29 March, 9 cases in the week to 5 April, WHO told the world.Many thanks to international efforts, including the UN and its organizations, the EU, AU, MSF, the US Center of Disease Control, other international organizations and NGOs, foreign countries (for example Britain, USA, China, Canada, Australia, Cuba and many others unnamed) who have been of great help to Africa; and people who are praying for the Continent and helping those residing in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.However, it is inarguable that the EVD has been a malady teacher to the continent of Africa. It gave Africans a staid test and now it’s out of bed for lessons learned. It taught not only Africans a lesson, but everyone, including global policy makers and multilateral donors.Research has shown that Africa is the world’s richest continent for resources — full of crude oil, coal, diamonds, uranium and timbers. These are just few among the many natural resources that Africa has; yet, it is widely known that the continent languishes in depletion of its resources.Unprecedented wasteful spending of resources continues to undermine growth and development. Basic social services like education, health, roads, electricity, and water, which should be prioritized, are usually not in most African nations. Thus the ordinary masses become underprivileged and languish in pains and sufferings for the most part of their lives. No wonder Ebola practically met Africa, especially the West Africa’s health delivery system, ill prepared. Hence the question: Are Africa natural resources a curse or blessing?In Liberia, Ebola met the continent’s oldest independent state without needed human resources and lack of better facilities, ambulances, medical equipment and supplies (as simple as GLOVES) to care for infected and affected populations, resulting in the deaths of thousands of people, including the ordinary, doctors and nurses, religious leaders and you name it; despite millions of US dollars being generated as revenues from the national resources sector or infused into the economy from multilateral donors.The EVD crisis in the three Mano River Union (MRU) countries of Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea has left public officials and health practitioners with no alternative but to begin rethinking their strategies, and utilizing their resources for the general good of every citizen.Regionally, one lesson that the EVD outbreak has taught us in the sub-region is that the three governments should begin to plan ahead to meet future health disasters by investing in training of more health workers, building and equipping of regional epidemiology centers, investing resources in scientific research, and promoting botanical gardens as a source for the provision, growth and manufacturing of medicines for local consumption. The reason for such collaborative efforts by the MRU countries is that if they ‘do not scratch their stomachs first; no one will scratch their backs’; that is they must make substantive efforts first before outsiders will come to help them. For these countries saw how the WHO, in its own admission, said it was late in responding to the calamity in West Africa. For had it not been for MSF-France after its persistence that a calamity that could cause havoc in the world was occurring in West Africa, even the world body, UN, would have remained silent. Another lesson learned is that, in an emergency response, there is need to work together with communities, taking into consideration their norms. The social mobilization to communities suffered in the beginning because community mobilizers or social animators did not consider the people’s norms when planning to carry out the mobilization. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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The Power Is in ‘We The People’, Not The Government

first_imgDear Liberians,I greet you with peace, love, and above all else, the chi of oneness. I have been deeply confounded on what my next piece to you would concentrate on, considering there are series of issues affecting our country Liberia. I have given it some thought, and resolved to submit this op-ed as a baseline instrument to streamline our habitual political character in the upcoming 2017 elections. I would like to begin by explicitly stating that the intent of this paper is not to cast bad judgment(s) on governments of the past, neither our present leadership. I begin by stating that the exercise of true democracy lies not within the confines of the government, but in its citizenry. Thus, the vesting of our power through which we consciously or unconsciously give to our leaders via the casting of our votes, is a clear indication of what our standards, beliefs, and expectations are and/or should be. At this point, I am reminded of an adage that categorically sums up my prologue, and further projects a meaningful outline of the subject matter: “You’ve sold your land and accepted payment; therefore you must live with the consequences”. This metaphorical phrase is core to the reality of us accepting and living with the vices of the decisions we make. Amidst the everyday debates, the naming and shaming of our government leaders, I am inclined to mention that we fail to see ourselves as the problem we seek remedy for, when in fact we are the best remedy. If the government fails, it’s because we the people with the ultimate power have failed in the delegation of our national duties, and living with the ensuing effects can only be considered a fair judgment.Before Liberia today, our country could boast of men with moral up rightness, grit, and resilience; and the acuity and passion with which they served in lifting Liberia to a precipice amongst the League of Nations, remains unmatched in today’s Liberia. In Liberia today, a contrast in the protocol of service is drawn against history by our politicians, when instead they should use the past as a benchmark to challenge themselves against the marks upon which our forbearers have made.Circa July 2014, during the Ebola era, I departed Monrovia with a team of colleagues traveling to five (5) counties in Liberia: Bong, Nimba, Grand Gedeh, River Gee, and Maryland. This tour aimed at identifying problems rural inhabitants were (or are) faced with. We explored the ‘nooks and crannies’ of electoral districts with a designed questionnaire which set out to probe the social vices faced by rural Liberians. Our findings were quite appalling, as we for the first time came in full sight with poverty in the eyes of children; maimed by mal-nutrition and poor health facilities, a dying quest for quality education, and lest I forget to mention, the depressing roads, given that we had to sleep along the way several nights. We visited the shrines of town chiefs, schools, worship places ofPastors & Imams, hospitals/medical institutions; held meetings with youth groups, went to market places and listened to market women tell their stories about the ebb and flow in their businesses as a result of the road network. They looked at us so sternly as if we’ve brought the panacea to their problems. I looked at them and saw depression, pain, frustration, and a struggle to accept their conditions as they distastefully told their stories. The children hung around watching their mothers play advocates for them. After collecting our information and before leaving our sites for the day, my colleagues and I would buy and share rations of bread with the children, hoping that they too will go to bed with something to eat. However demeaning this picture I paint might appear, there are existing realities from which I find reasons to draw inspiration; knowing that we can make positive impacts in our children’s lives, even though we have to some degree failed ourselves as a people. I am vividly reminded of two (2) towns we visited, that left an indelible mark on me to which the underpinning of this publication is mostly credited; the towns of Zolowee (Nimba County) and Sentrude (Grand Gedeh County) respectively. I refer to them as the “Ghost Towns”.In the town of Zolowee, which if I am not mistaken is “à côté de” Guinean border, has a population of about 100 people or more. When we initially arrived, the few people that were there came out to greet us. As we approached, they welcomed us with traditional songs and offered kola nuts. During our usual Q&A routine, something caught my attention. In the house where we sat were pictures of every presidential candidate from 2011 elections glued on the wall. Some still wore T-shirts of candidates they supported whilst expressing their grievances. The stories told by each person interviewed converged at a central point: they have lost hope in their leaders. Yet I could not bring the ironies in their stories to a rational conclusion for which they still kept pictures of these politicians who they claimed have caused them a great deal of distress and failure. Along the way to the town of erstwhile president Samuel K. Doe, we made a stop in a town called Sentrude (Grand Gedeh Co). We were given a tour of the school and facilities there. It was a half painted blue and white building, built with mud blocks; windowless, with no seating and instructional materials, as was the clinic which was completely inactive. The women from the town informed us that when someone is sick and needs medical attention, they’re carried on the shoulders of two of the town’s men walking for 2 hours before reaching the next town to be treated. Then there was a child, I noticed, sitting in the dirt crying. I reached to pick him up and was warned not to, then realized he was handicapped. I asked the whereabouts of his parents, the townsmen informed us that they were both deceased, and the lad was left uncared for. This was one out of the many cases we dealt with, all sharing similar attributes. Given the above life altering experience, I am obliged to say that in order to determine the direction of our country, “WE THE CITIZENS” must first realize “WE ARE” the keys to the powers. Hence, any decisions made in our stead that do not incorporate the interest of Liberia, only underlines our incompetence to properly discharge and/or call to order our power. If we must entrust our sovereign power into the care of a person, he/she must primarily meet our demands. They must prove themselves worthy of attaining our power. But contrarily, we denigrate ourselves as a people when we, for a petty amount, auction a thing so valuable as our votes and consciousness.The power is in us, the people, and not the government. Hence, let the exchange of our power be an investment we make for ourselves, our children, and importantly for our country Liberia. Let it not be based on reasons of temporary gains, and tiredness of the problems we ourselves have in fact created; for we could only tread the path of recidivism if we do not apply ourselves to painstaking decisions that must matter to us as a people. Let us be driven by stories as such that dare us not to be selfish but selfless, not political but patriotic; knowing that a child without a chance at a decent education, medical coverage, and a proper nutrition, is a much greater campaign than the politics of bitterness, greed, and envy that continue to imprison and set us back as a people.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Liberia, Ethiopia to Cooperate on Education, Livestock, Fisheries, Health

first_imgLiberia and Ethiopia have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in the areas of education with emphasis on (TVET) for the development of human resource, Livestock and Fisheries, Cooperation in the field of health and medical sciences and cooperation in the field of commercial and industrial development. According to a dispatch from Addis Ababa, in the area of education, the MOU set a framework of cooperation for the Parties in the field of technical and vocational education (TVET) for the development of human resource; to encourage and strengthen their cooperation in the field of TVET by the exchange of experience and information on the sector and in accordance with their national laws, policies and strategies.In the area of livestock and fisheries, the deal seeks to encourage cooperation between interested institutions of the countries in various fields of Livestock and Fisheries, human resource development, research, and livestock and Fisheries development; encourage the establishment of livestock and fisheries developments in the private sector and taking into consideration the interests of the countries. Regarding health, the MOU is geared towards the promotion of cooperation between the Liberia and Ethiopia in the fields of health and medical sciences on the basis of equality and mutual benefit; exchange of information on health and medical science; exchange health professionals and experts with a view to share experience in designing innovative healthcare systems.Foreign Minister Marjon Kamara and Agriculture Minister Dr. Moses Zinnah signed on behalf of Government Liberia while Dr. Shiferaw Teklemariam, Minister of Education; Prof. Fekadu Beyene, Minister of Livestock and Fisheries; and Prof. Yifru Berhan, Minister of Health signed on behalf of the Ethiopian Government. Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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37 Linden youths graduate from First Lady’s ICT workshop

first_imgFirst Lady Sandra Granger attended the closing ceremony of the Information Communication Technology (ICT) Training programme in Linden, Upper Demerara-Berbice (Region Ten), which saw 37 youths receiving certificates accredited by the Board of Industrial Training (BIT).In brief remarks, the First Lady said the programme is aimed at providing young people with skills necessary for the world of work. She also praised the participants for completing the five-week programme.The programme, spearheaded by the Office of the First Lady, provides young adults with training in the areas of Information Communication Technology (ICT), literacy and numeracy, entrepreneurship, sexual reproductive health, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, micromanagement development; and soft skills, including ethics and time management.Similar workshops are slated to be held throughout the country.Director of Community Development and Social Management of the National Data Management Centre, Phillip Walcott, who delivered the feature address to the graduates, urged them to achieve all that they can as life progresses, and aspire to be innovative and motivated.“The people who will innovate are the people who are determined they will not be mediocre; they will not just be part of the crowd, but they will stand out.Do not be content to run with someone else’s vision; stand out! You are at a great starting point,” he said, as he noted that the programme is expected to be expanded.last_img read more

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Guyanese among 6 most wanted women on Interpol’s list

first_imgJulie Elizabeth Avel, 64, who has both Guyanese and German citizenship, is among six Caribbean women who have found themselves on Interpol’s wanted list, making them the Region’s most wanted women.Avel is wanted by authorities in Uruguay for murder. The others on the list are Nicole Russell, 29, of The Bahamas. She is wanted by United States authorities for aggravated assault, aggravated battery and possession of a knife during a felony.Also on the list is Maria Eugênia Olmes Garcia, 74, a Cuban wanted by Brazilian authorities for criminal association money laundering.Niurka Apolinar Pedro Silva, 53, of Guane Pinar Del Rio, Cuba is also wanted by Brazilian authorities for criminal association money laundering.In addition, Elizabeth Cleydy Peralta Marte, 27, of The Dominican Republic, is wanted by authorities in Argentina for counterfeiting money.The sixth woman on the list was identified as Patrícia Terezinha Miguel Bom, 43, of Suriname. She is wanted by authorities in Brazil for international drug trafficking.Interpol is asking anyone with information that can lead to the arrests of the six women to make contact with the local Police or the Interpol Office in the respect countries.last_img read more

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Ducks tonight

first_img – Elliott Teaford TV/Radio: Ch. 56, 830-AM Matchup: The Ducks (33-16-8) have been shut out in consecutive games and three of their past five. Their frustration boiled over late in a 2-0 loss Tuesday at Colorado, when winger Teemu Selanne barked a little too loudly about the officiating and drew a 10-minute misconduct. Selanne has nine goals and 14 assists in his past 13 games against Phoenix. The Ducks have won four of five this season against the Coyotes (25-30-2). Ducks at Phoenix Faceoff: 6 p.m., Jobing.com Arena. center_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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Sports: Places to watch and play

first_imgYOUTH SPORTS BASEBALL Agoura PONY Baseball, (818) 707-6268 Antelope Valley Colt & Palomino League, (661) 948-2325 Burbank Hap Minor, (818) 238-5330 Camarillo PONY Baseball Association, (805) 388-0829 Canyon Country Little League, (661) 298-1451 Castaic Little League, (661) 702-0332 Chatsworth Junior Baseball League, (818) 709-6395 Crescenta Sports Association, (626) 568-4797 El Dorado Little League (Lancaster), (661) 946-2360 Encino Little League, (818) 771-5488 Glendale Little League, (818) 951-2984 Malibu Little League, (310) 317-2018 Mid-Valley Baseball Association (Encino), (818) 708-8988 Mission Hills Little League, (818) 893-0505 Moorpark Little League, (805) 529-2931 Newbury Park PONY Baseball, (805) 375-1954 Northridge City Little League, (818) 368-4654 North Valley Youth Baseball (Granada Hills), (818) 368-7663 Pacoima Youth Athletic Association, (818) 897-3388 Palmdale Little League, (661) 285-2166 Palmdale PONY League, (661) 947-7676 San Fernando National Little League, (818) 361-8317 Santa Susana Baseball (Simi Valley), (805) 526-1768 Sherman Oaks Little League, (818) 986-5003 Simi Valley Baseball League, (805) 581-3378 Sylmar Independent Baseball League, (818) 367-7211 Thousand Oaks Little League, (805) 370-8360 Tujunga Little League, (818) 352-9970 Valley Christian Athletic Association (Encino), (818) 781-8222 Westhill Baseball, (818) 346-2255 West Valley Little League (Encino), (818) 989-1566 William S. Hart PONY, (661) 254-9780 FOOTBALL Agoura Oak Park Youth Football, (818) 991-3549 Camarillo Roadrunners, (805) 388-8995 East Lancaster Jets, (661) 943-3062 Highland Bulldogs, (661) 305-7472 Moorpark Packers, (805) 529-1003 Newbury Park Steelers, (805) 498-5443 North Valley Athletic Club, (661) 257-3509 Oxnard 49ers, (805) 469-5292 Thousand Oaks Titans, (805) 289-4882 Valley Falcons, (818) 365-2961 West Valley Eagles, (818) 734-9955 GYMNASTICS Anti-Gravity Sports Complex (Valencia), (661) 702-0123 Crescenta Ca?ada YMCA (La Ca?ada), (818) 790-0123 Fun and fit (Burbank), (818) 845-0700 Fun and fit (Santa Clarita), (661) 255-7244 Golden State Gymnastics (Burbank), (818) 558-1177 Gymnastics Olympica (Van Nuys), (818) 785-1537 Gymnastics Unlimited (Valencia), (661) 257-2496 Junior Gym Home of Lyons Gymnastics Academy (Van Nuys), (818) 785-2177 Wallers’ GYMJAM Academy (Santa Clarita), (661) 251-3390 SOCCER AYSO Region 4 (Westlake, Agoura), (818) 707-8557 AYSO Region 8 (Granada Hills), (818) 325-2052 AYSO Region 9 (Thousand Oaks), (805) 497-8655 AYSO Region 29 (Winnetka), (818) 775-2929 AYSO Region 33 (Encino, Tarzana, Reseda), (818) 342-4266 AYSO Region 42 (Newbury Park), (805) 498-7284 AYSO Region 46 (Saugus, Santa Clarita), (661) 296-2976 AYSO Region 58 (Van Nuys, Sherman Oaks), (818) 907-8689 AYSO Region 68 (Camarillo), (805) 484-9982 AYSO Region 71 (Woodland Hills, west San Fernando Valley), (818) 700-2976 AYSO Region 91 (Lancaster), (661) 945-0207 AYSO Region 174 (Granada Hills, Northridge, Sylmar), (818) 366-7505 AYSO Region 254 (Burbank, Glendale), (818) 841-2976 AYSO Region 363 (Moorpark), (805) 529-7666 AYSO Region 393 (Palmdale), (661) 722-5386 AYSO Region 638 (Quartz Hill, Palmdale, Lancaster), (661) 943-7008 AYSO Region 677 (Canyon Country, Acton, Agua Dulce), (661) 252-2976 AYSO Region 678 (Valencia, Newhall, Castaic, Stevenson Ranch), (661) 255-6826 AYSO Region 795 (Chatsworth, Porter Ranch), (818) 885-1639 AYSO Region 1430 (San Fernando, Mission Hills), (818) 881-2976 SOFTBALL Camarillo Girls Softball Association (CGSA), (805) 484-5501 Crescenta Sports Association, (626) 568-4797 Glendale Little League, (818) 951-2984 Newbury Park Girls Softball League, (805) 499-5972 Northridge ASA Girls Softball, (818) 368-4654 Sylmar Independent Baseball League, (818) 833-4426 Thousand Oaks Girls Softball Association, (805) 493-2101 Valley Christian Athletic Association (Encino), (818) 781-8222 Westlake-Agoura Girls Softball League, (818) 597-8384 West Valley Girls Softball League, (818) 382-2966 Simi Valley Softball, (805) 522-0019 TRACK Chatsworth Chiefs, (818) 420-4200 Northridge Pacers, (818) 360-5769 Simi Valley Running Rebels, (805) 584-2467 United Track Club, (805) 497-2350 VOLLEYBALL Thousand Oaks Spectrum VBC (Thousand Oaks), (805) 778-0888, Ext. 207 WATER POLO Los Angeles Water Polo Club, (818) 503-2349 L.A. PARKS Branford R.C. (Arleta), (818) 893-4923 Sports offered: softball/baseball (winter-spring) D. Gonzalez/Pacoima R.C. (Pacoima), (818) 899-1950 Sports offered: baseball (spring), flag football (fall), basketball (winter), soccer (winter) Fernangeles R.C. (Sun Valley), (818) 767-4171 Sports offered: baseball (spring), basketball (spring and winter) Hubert Humphrey R.C. (Pacoima), (818) 896-6510 Sports offered: softball/baseball (spring), basketball (winter), flag football (fall) Lake View Terrace R.C., (818) 899-8087 Sports offered: basketball (winter, spring, summer, fall) Ritchie Valens R.C. (Pacoima), (818) 834-5172 Sports offered: Basketball, soccer, T-ball/softball Stonehurst R.C. (Sun Valley), (818) 767-0314 Sports offered: Basketball, soccer, baseball/softball Sunland R.C., (818) 352-5282 Sports offered: Basketball, football, wood-bat baseball/T-ball, softball Sylmar R.C., (818) 367-5656 Sports offered: Basketball, summer, winter; flag football, fall; baseball/softball, spring, summer Van Nuys Sherman Oaks R.C., (818) 783-5121 Sports offered: Karate, gymnastics (every 10 weeks); flag football (fall); basketball (summer and spring); baseball, softball (spring) Van Nuys R.C., (818) 756-8131 Sports offered: Baseball, softball (spring); boys’ soccer, girls’ soccer (fall); karate, gymnastics, ballet (every 10 weeks); ice skating (every 6 weeks) RECREATIONAL SPORTS SOFTBALL/BASKETBALL Burbank, adult league play, (818) 238-5300 Glendale, adult league play, (818) 548-2000 Lancaster, adult league play, (661) 723-6077 Palmdale, adult league play, (661) 267-5611 San Fernando Valley, adult league play, (818) 765-0284 Simi Valley, adult league play, (805) 584-4400 BASEBALL San Fernando Valley, adult league play, (818) 765-0284 HOCKEY Burbank, Pickwick Ice Center, (818) 845-5300 Panorama City, Valley Ice Center, (818) 893-1784 Valencia, Ice Station, (661) 775-8686 TENNIS Burbank, (818) 238-5300 Glendale, (818) 548-2000 Lancaster, (661) 723-6077 Palmdale, (661) 267-5611 San Fernando Valley, (818) 765-0284 Santa Clarita Valley, (661) 286-4000 Simi Valley, (805) 584-4400 WATER SPORTS Castaic Lake: fishing, swimming, sailing, skiing, (661) 257-4050 Lake Piru: fishing, swimming, skiing, (805) 521-1500 PROFESSIONAL TEAMS Los Angeles Dodgers, (323) 224-1448, www.dodgers.com Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, (714) 663-9000, angels.mlb.com Los Angeles Clippers, (213) 742-7555, www.clippers.com Los Angeles Lakers, (213) 742-7400, www.lakers.com Los Angeles Sparks, (877) 44-SPARKS, www.wnba.com/sparks Anaheim Ducks, (714) 740-2000, www.anaheimducksmightyducks.com Los Angeles Kings, (213) 742-7100, www.lakings.com Los Angeles Galaxy, (877) 342-5299, www.lagalaxy.com Club Deportivo Chivas USA, (877) 244-8271, www.cdchivasusa.com Los Angeles Avengers, (213) 480-3232, www.laavengers.com Lancaster JetHawks, (661) 726-5400, www.jethawks.com COLLEGE TEAMS University of Southern California, (213) 740-GO SC, www.usctrojans.com University of California, Los Angeles, (310) 825-2946, www.uclabruins.com California State University, Northridge, (818) 677-2488, www.gomatadors.com Pepperdine, (310) 506-4935, www.pepperdine/edu/athletics Loyola Marymount, (310) 338-5466, www.lmulions.com 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. 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Dawson Creek RCMP respond to fatal roll over

first_imgThe 27 year old male of Grande Prairie was ejected from the vehicle in the roll over. The driver was taken to hospital in Dawson Creek with head and chest trauma. The individual passed away as the result of his injuries at Dawson Creek Hospital.No further details are available.- Advertisement –last_img

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