Cuco Is Making A Different Kind Of Latin Pop

first_img Celia CruzPhoto: M. Caulfield/WireImage Cuco Is Making A Different Kind Of Latin Pop cuco-making-different-kind-latin-pop Esperanza Spalding Is Making Waves In Her Own Lane Esperanza Spalding Is Making Waves In Her Own Lane Inside Maluca Mala’s Daring Sound Amara La Negra Photo: Mike Pont/Getty Images Meet the 20-year-old artist making dream pop straight out of Southern California.Jennifer VelezGRAMMYs Oct 15, 2018 – 6:25 pm “I’m like stupid emotional,” Cuco says in a Genius video wearing his signature large glasses and shaggy hair. “I think art is what keeps an artist able to express their emotions and not go crazy.” Cuco’s music is dream pop straight out of Southern California and “stupid emotional” is exactly how you’ll feel listening to his atmospheric, mellow synth, oldies-inspired beats, topped with emotional lyrics.  On “Lo Que Siento” he sings “And nobody’s touch and nobody’s lips can make me feel like yours do/Our hands in a lock, nuestros labios se conocen (Our lips meet).” Hispanic Heritage Month 2018 Amara La Negra On Her Afro-Latina Identity SUPP BABYYYYY CHECK IT OUT https://t.co/IZ6Gb0qfU6— CUCO (@Icryduringsex) May 4, 2018The Hawthorne, Calif. native is a self-produced multi-instrumentalist who grew up listening to Chicano rappers like Lil’ Rob and MC Magic, both smooth rappers that jump from English to Spanish throughout their verses. MC Magic’s music stands out for his use of synthesizers. You hear bits and pieces of the genre’s influence in Cuco’s music, who himself is Mexican-American. Other influences include Tame Impala. He launched into the spotlight with a cover of Santo & Johnny’s “Sleepwalk” and has since garnered a following of thousands on social media.”I will never underestimate the strength of a fan-girl ever again. They’re wild,” his manager Doris Munoz told the L.A. Times about the rise of his following. The 20-year-old artist’s sentimental vibe connects mostly with young Latinas and thus has been dubbed a “heart-throb.”Rolling Stone captured Cuco’s role in the music industry well: “In a music industry that’s been cashing in on more urban genres like reggaeton and Latin trap, acts like Cuco represent an alternative dimension of Latin pop that’s picking up steam in United States.”But, Cuco doesn’t want to be pigeon-holed. “It’s cool, like I’m super open to doing things for like my people, my own culture, but ultimately I make music for everybody,” he told the Fader.  Cuco is currently recovering from an accident that happened in early October and has canceled the rest of his 2018 tour.Learn more about Cuco’s sound:”Lover Is A Day””Lover Is A Day” is the song Cuco is most proud of. The song “did so well like I never even though it would do so well, it kind of got me out there,” he told Teal magazine.”Lo Que Siento””Lo Que Siento” or “What I Feel” was inspired by Chicano rappers Lil’ Rob and MC Magic. I just heard the chord progression for “Lo Que Siento” in kind of a way where it’s mixed with a lot of Chicano rap. But then there’s also that indie side of it with guitars and all that other bullshit. It was just in the moment,” he told Genius.”Amor De Siempre”This all Spanish-language song has Cuco singing about waking up next to his lover and looking into her eyes. “When I look at those eyes, that’s where I want to live/ If you kiss me, that’s where I want to die.” 7 Artists Who Have Added New Life To Reggaeton Prev Next How Bad Bunny Is Putting Latin Trap On The Map Bad BunnyPhoto: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images 7 Artists Who Have Added New Life To Reggaeton IbeyiPhoto: David Wolff – Patrick/Redferns Inside Maluca Mala’s Daring Sound Amara La Negra Photo: Mike Pont/Getty Images Facebook Ibeyi Are Leaving Their Mark On U.S. Pop Culture IbeyiPhoto: David Wolff – Patrick/Redferns Ibeyi Are Leaving Their Mark On U.S. Pop Culture Esperanza SpaldingPhoto: Noam Galai/Getty Images Princess Nokia Is Making Space For The Voiceless IbeyiPhoto: David Wolff – Patrick/Redferns Bad BunnyPhoto: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images Cuco Is Making A Different Kind Of Latin Pop Amara La Negra Photo: Mike Pont/Getty Images Amara La Negra On Her Afro-Latina Identity Amara La Negra On Her Afro-Latina Identity Ibeyi Are Leaving Their Mark On U.S. Pop Culture Twitter Email Maluca MalaPhoto: J. Grassi/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images Celia CruzPhoto: M. Caulfield/WireImage Princess Nokia Is Making Space For The Voiceless Princess Nokia Is Making Space For The Voiceless Karol GPhoto: Alexander Tamargo/Getty Images Bad BunnyPhoto: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images Inside Maluca Mala’s Daring Sound How Bad Bunny Is Putting Latin Trap On The Map Princess Nokia Photo: Burak Cingi/Redferns Celia CruzPhoto: M. Caulfield/WireImage The Latinas Of ‘Women Who Rock’ Read more News Maluca MalaPhoto: J. Grassi/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images Maluca MalaPhoto: J. Grassi/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images The Latinas Of ‘Women Who Rock’ Esperanza Spalding Is Making Waves In Her Own Lane 7 Artists Who Have Added New Life To Reggaeton Princess Nokia Photo: Burak Cingi/Redferns Karol GPhoto: Alexander Tamargo/Getty Images Esperanza SpaldingPhoto: Noam Galai/Getty Images Princess Nokia Photo: Burak Cingi/Redferns The Latinas Of ‘Women Who Rock’ How Bad Bunny Is Putting Latin Trap On The Map Karol GPhoto: Alexander Tamargo/Getty Images Esperanza SpaldingPhoto: Noam Galai/Getty Imageslast_img read more

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Bengaluru water crisis will only worsen as governments chase wrong policies

first_imgDay Zero in Bengaluru.ReutersBengaluru’s water shortage is a topic that has grabbed intense focus over the years. Everyone agrees that rapid expansion of India’s Silicon Valley has led to alarming depletion of water sources. Yet very little has been done over the years to address the basic problems. The latest projections say Bengaluru will run out of groundwater by 2020 due to the fast pace of growth and urbanisation. However, the authorities are turning a blind eye to the core issues even as the ‘Day Zero’ is almost here. A quick examination of the mess reveals that misplaced policy priorities have worsened the problem over the years. A conversation the International Business Times had with the Indian Institute of Science Professor TV Ramachandra reveals that governments have missed the bus when it comes to preventing the looming water crisis.Professor TV Ramachandra, who is part of the Energy and Wetlands Research Group, was the first to warn that Bengaluru is likely to be the next Cape Town due to the water crisis. He reveals that the situation at hand is critical. As much as 81 percent of the 746 sq km area of Bengaluru is concretised currently. In comparison, during the 1970s, 68.7 percent of the city was covered in green. Between 1973 and 2017, concretised areas have increased 1,028 percent, while 88 percent of green cover and 79 percent of water bodies have been lost. Government should take up cost-effective measuresWhile it’s clear that rampant development has led to the depletion of water sources and the deterioration of the environment, what’s more disturbing is the fact that the proposed solutions are not the right ones. According to Prof Ramachandra, Bengaluru receives 700-800 mm of rainfall but rainwater harvesting is not being implemented adequately. Nearly 15 TMC of water can be saved through rainwater harvesting, but instead of looking at these options governments have been chasing multi-crore projects like Mekedatu, Sharavati and Yetinahole.The most efficient way to conserve water is to rejuvenate the lake and retain the rainwater. If the lakes in Bellandur and Varthur region are desilted 5.4 TMC of water can be stored in the region Corruption The solution for burning civic issues mostly runs into bureaucratic and political corruption. Not just Bengaluru but 370 districts in the country are under drought. The mismanagement of water sources and unplanned urbanisation have taken people to the brink. Water for daily use is getting costlier every year and the tanker mafia is choking city dwellers. At the same time, the government is not looking at cost-effective measures but taking up multi-crore projects.Desilting of lakes, watershed management, recycling and reusing of wastewater should be implemented widely by the government, according to experts. Water contamination affecting healthNot just the quantum of water but the quality of it is also a problem in large urban areas. Vegetable and fish samples taken from lakebeds reveal a high level of contamination. “We took food samples from Bellandur area including fish, spinach and mint. All had the presence of heavy metal and it gets reflected in health in the form of cancer or kidney failure. The environmental literacy in Bengaluru is only 3.5 percent although we have educated people all around the city and the ecological degradation is linked to it,” says Prof Ramachandra. KSPCB monitor displaying water qualityAmal RasheedaliHe also highlights the fact that the BBMP data on water quality is all but flawed. When asked about the water quality data shown on LED screens installed around the city, the expert pointed out that the data could be flawed. “The BWSSB secondary treatment plant cannot remove the nutrients or heavy metals, in the inflow it shows the presence of these nutrients but in the outflow, it is zero,” he said.Who will address Bengaluru’s water woes? It’s estimated that as much as 98.5 percent of the city landscape will be concretised by 2025. Will a solution be in place by then? Only if the government acts quickly and adopts the right strategies.  IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:01/1:26Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-1:25?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading … Closecenter_img The Mekedatu project in Ramanagara district aims to enhance the supply of drinking water to Bengaluru and recharge the groundwater table in the region. The project cost is around Rs 5,900 crore, according to the DPR. On top of it, nearly 52.5 sq km of forest land will be submerged if the controversial project goes ahead.The objective of Sharavati project was to bring the river water to Bengaluru from Linganamakki reservoir in Shivamogga district. But according to studies, the water retention in the catchment has come down and the dam there is silted. To make it worse, people living downstream Sharavati did not have water during the summer, raising questions if it was feasible to transfer water to Bengaluru. Yetinahole is a similar case and comes with a revised cost of Rs 13,000 crore. The authorities say it harnesses 24 TMC of water but in reality, only 9.85 TMC is available.Prof Ramachandra tells IBT Media that rejuvenation of lakes and propagation of water harvesting are the more efficient ways to conserve water than implementing big-budget projects. However, even when many of these government projects are failing and public money is wasted, not many seem to be questioning the wrong policies. “The most efficient way to conserve water is to rejuvenate the lake and retain the rainwater. If the lakes in Bellandur and Varthur region are desilted 5.4 TMC of water can be stored in the region. But the BDA has an objection against removing the silt as they said that only 20 per cent will be desilted,” said Prof Ramachandra.The BWSSB secondary treatment plant cannot remove the nutrients or heavy metals, in the inflow it shows the presence of these nutrients but in the outflow, it is zero The largest water body & the most polluted lake in Karnatakalast_img read more

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Indonesia Airline plagued by safety concerns

first_imgA worker assists his colleague as an turbine engine of Lion Air flight JT610 is lifted up at Tanjung Priok port in Jakarta. Photo: ReutersIn April 2013, a Lion Air Boeing 737 missed the runway on the Indonesian resort island of Bali in bad weather and ploughed into the sea, cracking its fuselage open on the rocks.All 108 on board survived. But a September 2014 report by Indonesia’s air crash investigators highlighted errors and poor training, saying the 24-year-old co-pilot had failed to adhere to the “basic principles of jet aircraft flying.”Lion Air, struggling to get off a European Union blacklist because of “unaddressed safety concerns,” asked Airbus, which supplies part of its fleet, to help improve training.The EU removed the privately owned budget airline from the list in 2016 after it determined Lion Air met international safety standards. None of Indonesia’s roughly 100 airlines – most of them tiny – remain on the EU blacklist, with the last few coming off in June. All were banned in 2007; the national carrier, Garuda Indonesia, was the first to be removed in 2009.The crash of a Lion Air jet on Oct. 29 into the sea off Jakarta has put a spotlight back on the airline’s safety record, although the cause remains undetermined. None of the aircraft’s 189 passengers and crew survived.Lion Air’s latest crisis illustrates the challenge relatively new carriers face as they try to keep pace with unstoppable demand for air travel in developing nations while striving for standards that mature markets took decades to reach.Retired air force chief of staff Chappy Hakim, an adviser to the transport ministry, told Reuters he avoided flying with Lion Air or other Indonesian airlines, with the exception of Garuda, which has not had a fatal crash since 2007.“I know Garuda,” he said of the national carrier. “The other airlines, I don’t believe they do the maintenance and training properly.” He declined to elaborate further.Lion Air Managing Director Daniel Putut disputed any laxity in the airline’s safety culture, stressing that it conducted maintenance in accordance with manufacturer guidelines.The Directorate General of Civil Aviation, the Indonesian aviation authority, did not respond to multiple requests for comment about Lion Air’s safety record.Putut, a former pilot, also told Reuters during a visit to the airline’s training centre near the Jakarta airport that it complied with all regulatory requirements.He said Lion Air had worked hard to install an attitude of “zero tolerance” for accidents after the Bali crash, making last week’s disaster a painful eye-opener. Thousands of Lion Air flights have taken off and landed without serious incident since then.“We are also looking into what went wrong – new aircraft, experienced crews, and we have applied the zero-tolerance culture, yet another accident happened,” Putut said. “But we still don’t know the cause, so we will wait for the investigation from NTSC (National Transportation Safety Committee).”SAFETY CULTUREFrank Caron, head of a risk consulting firm who served as Lion Air’s safety manager from 2009 to 2011 after insurance companies requested a foreign expert, said that at the time he was troubled by what he regarded as the airline’s attitude that accidents were inevitable.“Safety is much more than running concepts and procedures,” he said. “Safety is a spirit, a state of mind, a way of thinking, an attitude in the daily aspects of an operational life. And that is precisely what Lion never got. They would say, ‘The airline has 250 flights a day, it is not abnormal that you have accidents.’”For example, after the 2013 Bali crash, Lion Air co-founder Rusdi Kirana told local media who asked about the airline’s safety record: “If we are seen to have many accidents, it’s because of our frequency of flights.”Caron claimed he left Lion Air after some of his safety recommendations were not implemented. Lion Air’s chief executive declined to comment on Caron’s account of his departure or his other assertions.Indonesian accident investigators made four recommendations after the Bali crash, including that Lion Air should “ensure that all pilots must be competent in hand flying” and teach proper cockpit coordination.They also urged the aviation authority to ensure all airlines under its control did the same.Putut said Lion Air embraced those recommendations.Between the Bali crash and the one last week, Lion Air had three non-fatal accidents, including one in April in which a 737 skidded off a runway, according to Flight Safety Foundation’s Aviation Safety Network database.Since it began operating 18 years ago, Lion Air has seen a total of eight planes damaged beyond repair in accidents, two of which killed a combined 214 people, according to the Aviation Safety Network database.During the same period, five jets from its chief rival, the national carrier Garuda Indonesia, were damaged beyond repair, and two accidents killed a combined 22 people, according to the database. Garuda declined to comment about its safety record.Since the 2013 Bali crash, Lion Air has sought to improve safety by gaining European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) certification for its pilot training and maintenance facilities.EASA certifies its training centre to instruct other airlines’ pilots on A320 simulators and is seeking the same approvals for 737 jets and ATR72 turboprops, said Audy L Punuh, Lion Air’s Angkasa Pilot Training Organisation Director.RAPID GROWTHLion Air has expanded quickly since it started flying in 2000, overtaking national carrier Garuda by capturing more than half of the domestic market and establishing offshoots in Thailand and Malaysia.It has ridden a wave of aviation growth in Indonesia, where air travel has become critical for the economy.Domestic air traffic more than tripled in Indonesia over the past decade as prosperity and low fares made flying affordable for more people.With 129 million passengers in 2017, the Southeast Asian country was already the world’s 10th-largest aviation market and is projected to continue growing.That growth has been accompanied by an air-accident rate that was twice the global average in 2017 and consistently higher than Indonesia’s neighbours in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, according to the United Nations’ aviation agency.Indonesian pilots are allowed to fly a maximum of 110 hours a month, which is more than the 100 hours in most other countries.Last year seven commercial planes were damaged beyond repair around the world, according to Boeing data; two were in Indonesia, wrecked in non-fatal accidents involving Sriwijaya Air and Tri M.G. Airlines.LATEST CRASHFlight JT610 took off from Jakarta at 6:20 a.m. on Oct. 29, bound for Bangka island, off Sumatra, and plunged into the sea 13 minutes later. Just before the crash, the pilot asked to return to the airport.The aircraft flew erratically on its previous flight and its airspeed readings were unreliable, according to an accident investigator and a flight tracking website.Investigators on Monday said the flight data recorder from the downed jet showed an airspeed indicator had been damaged during its final four flights, raising questions about maintenance and mechanical problems.Boeing said on Wednesday it had issued a bulletin to airlines reminding pilots about what it described as existing procedures for handling erroneous data from sensors.The Federal Aviation Administration later issued a directive calling for revisions to “operating procedures of the airplane flight manual.”It is too early for regulators to decide whether to reconsider the decision to remove Lion Air from the EU blacklist, EU Ambassador to Indonesia Vincent Guerend told Reuters.“The European Commission continues to monitor the situation on a regular basis,” he said. “It is still too early to have any conclusive views on the causes of the accident.”last_img read more

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Mamata trains gun on Centre for not dredging Farakka

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee on Tuesday accused the Centre of not carrying out dredging in Farakka and other barrages for a long time, thereby causing food crisis in various parts of the state during heavy rains.While speaking in the Assembly, Banerjee said the Centre has not taken any positive steps in this regard, despite repeated pleas by the Bengal government. “There has been no dredging work in Farakka for years, as a result of which the water holding capacity of the barrage is getting reduced,” she said and blamed the Damodar Valley Corporation (DVC) for not undertaking dredging work in various dams and barrages. Also Read – Rs 13,000 crore investment to provide 2 lakh jobs: MamataThe Chief Minister also pointed out that Jharkhand and Bihar governments discharge a huge amount of water during monsoon, as a result of which a vast portion of the state gets flooded. The matter has been raised with both the Bihar and Jharkhand governments, but no steps have been taken in this regard, Banerjee alleged. She also said that river Atrai has been drying up after the Bangladesh government set up a dam on it and criticised the role of the Centre in not taking up the issue with Bangladesh. Also Read – Lightning kills 8, injures 16 in state”It is a bilateral issue. We have taken up the matter with the Prime Minister and External Affairs minister a number of times in this regard. Because of the dam, people from South Dinajpur district are suffering. However, the Centre has not taken up the issue despite our repeated requests,” Banerjee told the House, in response to an opposition MLA’s question in this regard. The Atrai river flows from Siliguri into Bangladesh, before flowing back into South Dinajpur. It may be mentioned here that the nearly 400 km long river has been a source of livelihood to thousands of fishermen and farmers in the region. Its flow has been affected severely by the dam in Bangladesh. Following the construction, the riverbed had started going dry in summer. The Chief Minister also said that various stretches in North Bengal also get flooded as Bhutan discharges water along the Sankosh River. “We are suffering only because a huge amount of water gets discharged from outside. Jharkhand and Bihar do not take any steps despite our requests to release water in lesser volume,” Banerjee added.last_img read more

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