URCA still investigating Black Friday black out of mobile protability

first_img Aliv joins Bahamas MP & PM for Back to school event Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNassau, Bahamas – November 28, 2017 – URCA is still investigating why there were mobile number portability problems on Black Friday for users switching from BTC to Aliv.Stephen Bereaux, the Utilities Regulation and Competition Authority’s (URCA) chief executive said: “There are some lingering challenges across mobile number portability that we are working with the operators to resolve. We, at this stage, without any suggestion of blame from URCA’s perspective in relation to the rules that govern mobile number portability in the Bahamas, think there clearly was a breakdown of sorts and it was inconsistent with how things are supposed to happen.“Whether that was a technical issue or process issue, how it would have been caused and what action we should take, we are doing our investigation and we expect to be able to give the public a little more information on the cause and where the problem originated.”URCA’s CEO also shared that if it turns out there has been a breach, they are prepared to deal with it, but for now, the public is advised that “with these systems occasionally there may be issues.” Recommended for you ALIV Sponsors 9th Annual Bahamas National Trust Eco Camp Related Items:#Aliv, #urca, btc More BTC Layoffs, interim CEO says company restructuring Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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Researchers prove dogs are able to differentiate colors

first_img Explore further More information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B doi: 10.1098/rspb.2013.1356 For much of history, dogs have been assumed to be able to see only in black and white—their ability to differentiate between different colored objects was believed to be due to differences in brightness. In this new research, the team in Russia built on research recently conducted in the U.S. that found that dogs have two cones in their eyes suggesting they should have some ability to differentiate colors. Humans as most remember from grade school, have three cones, which allows for seeing all three primary colors. Since dogs have only two, they should be able to see some colors, but not others—blues, greens and yellows, for example, but not reds or oranges.To find out if dogs are in fact able to see colors and to distinguish between them, the team conducted a clever experiment. First they trained several dogs to respond to one of four different colored pieces of paper: light or dark yellow and light or dark blue (by putting paper pairs in front of feedboxes that contained meat.) The dogs soon learned that certain colors meant they were in for a treat.Next, using the same dogs that had been trained to respond to certain colors, the team placed pieces of paper with the color that they’d been taught to respond to in front of a feed box, along with another piece of paper that was brighter, but of a different color—a dog trained to respond to light blue for example would hopefully respond to dark blue instead of light yellow. The researchers found that a majority of the dogs went for the color identifier rather than brightness identifier most of the time, proving that they were able to distinguish color and were not relying on brightness to find their food treat.The researchers suggest their findings indicate that most animals with just two cones are likely able to differentiate between colors and thus it’s likely they respond in ways that have not been previously studied. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. A team of researchers in Russia has conducted a series of experiments that prove that dogs are able to distinguish between different colors. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the team describes the experiments with dogs they conducted and the results they found. © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B A yellow labrador retriver dog with pink nose. Credit: Wikipedia. Citation: Researchers prove dogs are able to differentiate colors (2013, July 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-07-dogs-differentiate.html Dogs may understand human point of view, researcher findslast_img read more

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