Every NBA Teams Chance Of Winning In Every Minute Across Every Game

Can you summarize the NBA season in one chart? With 794 games, more than 152,000 possessions and some 372,000 plays, probably not, but we’ve given it a shot. What you see above is the 2014-15 season’s win probabilities, summarized. At any point in an NBA game, each team has a probability of winning based on the time remaining, the score and the situation (i.e. after a made shot, shooting foul, etc.). In the chart, each team’s in-game win probability is averaged over each minute of regulation time. It’s like watching a win-loss record develop in real time.The win probability model that provides the foundation of the chart uses data from 13 NBA seasons (2000 to 2012). The model is not based on simulations, but rather it does its best to reflect how NBA games are actually played, won and lost.One of our favorite findings: The Golden State Warriors and Atlanta Hawks share a similar win-loss record, but they’ve taken different paths to get to that point. The Warriors have shown more dominance throughout games, often building early, insurmountable leads. The Hawks, in contrast, don’t pull away until the fourth quarter.Let us know about your own discoveries in the comments below. read more

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Hummels injury alters Big Ten race

It has been a year full of injuries in the Big Ten.Before the season even started, Northwestern lost its best player, Kevin Coble. Then it was Ohio State’s Evan Turner, Indiana’s Maurice Creek and Michigan State’s Kalin Lucas. But now, as the season approaches its end, the conference’s highest-ranked team has been bit by the injury bug in perhaps the most devastating fashion.Purdue’s Robbie Hummel tore his right ACL in a win last week at Minnesota and will miss the remainder of the season. Hummel was a member of the All-Conference team a season ago and was averaging almost 16 points, seven rebounds and two assists a game before the injury.“I was sick,” OSU coach Thad Matta said when asked what he thought upon hearing of Hummel’s injury. “You hate to see that for any player—any kid. It’s just, it’s not right”The Buckeyes witnessed firsthand Hummel’s importance to the Boilermakers in last month’s game at Purdue. Although OSU managed to win the game, Hummel scored a career-high 35 points, including 29 in the first half. “I love his game and I’ve told him that,” Matta said. “He can pass, he can shoot, he can put it on the floor and he rebounds on both ends. Obviously he’s a tremendous loss for Purdue.”With him in the lineup, Purdue had Big Ten and even National Championship aspirations. Although both are still attainable, neither will be nearly as easy with Hummel watching from the sideline. read more

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Titus This is my story of what I did in college

Senior guard Jon Diebler might have one of the purest shots in the history of the Ohio State basketball program, yet his shooting stroke can never earn him the nickname “Mr. Rainmaker.” That moniker belongs to “Club Trillion” blog founder and former Buckeye Mark Titus. The blog’s popularity and Titus’ writing spurred a book deal with the Doubleday Publishing Group — an announcement Titus made Feb. 21 on Twitter. Titus told The Lantern his intent behind penning the book was not to publish it, but to use it as a personal memento. “As corny as it sounds, I wanted to hand it to my kids and say, ‘This is my story of what I did in college,’” Titus said. “After my junior year, after about a year of the blog, I realized there would probably be an outside interest in a book.” The book, titled “Don’t Put Me In, Coach,” will chronicle Titus’ role as a team manager turned walk-on at OSU. “There are going to be a lot of stories about my teammates, the dumb stuff they did that I like to make fun of,” he said. “The overall gist will be what I went through over the course of four years, and the funny things that went alongside playing with guys like Greg Oden, Mike Conley and Evan Turner.” The book has already spawned interest — particularly with OSU coach Thad Matta. “I can’t wait to see what he’s got coming out of there,” Matta said in a press conference Feb. 21. “I don’t even know what the book’s about.” Matta frequently asks about the book. “It’s like he’s nervous about what I’m going to write,” Titus said. “I don’t know if he’s going to read it, but I know the other coaches will. I’ve been told they want to screen it before I release it.” Titus’ legacy at OSU wasn’t just an impending book deal. When he graduated, he held the record for most career wins with 110, a mark he shared with fellow former walk-on Danny Peters. Unfortunately for Titus, fifth-year senior forward David Lighty broke that record against Minnesota on Jan. 9. “With guys like me, who can’t actually lay claim to anything, we search for ways you can twist it,” Titus said. “I decided to put the caveat on it that he’s a fifth-year player, so I have the four-year record still.” In his time in Columbus, Titus also cashed in on the YouTube craze of making “trick-shot” videos. His video, “Mr. Rainmaker,” set to the tune of the Warrant song by the same name, has nearly 400,000 views. “I never really thought of my video as a ‘trick-shot’ video,” Titus said. “At least, not until people started showing me all of these other ‘trick-shot’ videos.” Titus mentioned Duke forward Kyle Singler, who made a similar video called “Kyle Gets Buckets.” Titus said that video, released after “Mr. Rainmaker,” had a lot of elements similar to his. “The intro, where he looks at the camera, says something he thinks is funny, shoots it and then looks back at the camera — I took that as a blatant rip-off of mine,” he said. “I knew he obviously was going to get more attention for it because he’s a better player, so I just laughed it off.” Titus briefly wrote college basketball articles for ESPN.com before focusing on his book. With his experience from ESPN.com and The Walt Disney Co., Titus said he hopes he persuaded two of their most profitable personalities to help with his book. “(ESPN.com columnist) Bill Simmons and (ABC talk-show host) Jimmy Kimmel told me they would write the forward for the book,” Titus said. “If nothing else, I can throw their names on the book and sell a few more copies.” Titus said the book will be released March 2012 and that he hopes he can do a signing tour on campus before then. “Maybe I’ll try to get Ted Williams, the homeless man with the ‘golden voice,’ to do my audio book, too,” he said. “I’ll see if I can try to set that up.” read more

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Commentary Golf world ready for new face

Rory McIlroy did more than finish out a dominating US Open performance last Sunday in Bethesda, Md.; he finished golf’s search for its next superstar. The 22-year-old rocked the golf world last week with his 72-hole score of 16-under par, eight shots better than runner-up Jason Day. The win couldn’t have come at a better time for the young Irishman. McIlroy blew a 4-stroke lead at the Masters in Augusta, Ga., last month after leading the field for the first three rounds. He posted a final round 8-over-par 80 to fall out of the top-10. After turning pro in 2007 at the age of 18, McIlroy had posted three top-3 finishes in major tournaments before adding the US Open Championship to the list. It is no coincidence that McIlroy has climbed to the No. 4 spot in golf’s world rankings as he is the youngest player to win a Major since Scotland native Tom Morris won the British Open in 1868 at the age of 17. But no one is comparing McIlroy to Tom Morris. McIlroy’s recent success has instead been drawing comparisons to the likes of some of golf’s greatest players, such as Tiger Woods and Jack Nicklaus, and at the ripe age of 22 years, they are well-deserved. His win on Sunday brings back memories of Woods’ 12-stroke win at the 1997 Masters. The then-25-year-old Woods’ dominating performance catapulted his career and quickly made him the face of the golfing world. But Woods took a break from the PGA Tour in 2009 after a knee injury forced him to put a hold on his golfing career. After his personal issues forced him to continue his lockout from golf, the Tour was left with a handful of mediocre golfers who could not fill Tiger’s shoes. Golf became faceless. Ratings plummeted and major companies withdrew their tournament sponsorships. Even Jack Nicklaus’ once prestigious Memorial Tournament has begun to lack its luster, drawing slim and unenthusiastic crowds. And just as we began to get used to a world without Tiger and no-name tournament winners, Rory McIlroy appeared. As McIlroy tore through the back nine at Congressional Country Club last Sunday, many were waiting for him to fall apart. But that never happened. From tee to green, McIlroy exemplified the poise and precision of a Tiger-Woods Sunday charge. From hole-to-hole his confidence never left him, and as his final putt found the bottom of the cup, McIlroy wasn’t the only one who came out on top—golf won too. Golf’s future is now resting steadily on the shoulders of young players like McIlroy, and although he might not have the same fist-pumping enthusiasm as a guy named Tiger, an 8-stroke win in any tournament is sending a message: A changing of the guard has arrived. Rory McIlroy is here to stay. read more

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Ohio State 20 in Urban Meyer era after 3116 win against Central

First-year Ohio State coach Urban Meyer predicted the game against Central Florida would be “a war” and it certainly seemed that way at times Saturday. Meyer’s team won the war in the end. “We’re going to enjoy the win.  Winning major college football games is a tough duty, especially when you face a quality opponent,” Meyer said at a postgame press conference.  In the first-ever meeting between the schools, the Buckeyes and the Knights traded punches over the course of the first half before OSU pulled away in the third quarter for a 31-16 victory in Meyer’s second game in Columbus. OSU sophomore quarterback Braxton Miller again led the way for the No. 14 Buckeyes (2-0). Miller had 27 carries for 141 yards and tied a program record with three rushing touchdowns against unranked UCF (1-1). For Meyer, though, Miller’s 27 touches were far too many.  “That’s too much.  27 hits.  He’s blown out right now,” Meyer said. “We have to be smart.  Someone’s gotta run the ball.  And right now he’s our best answer.”  Miller was 18-of-24 passing with a touchdown pass to redshirt senior wide receiver Jake Stoneburner and finished the day with 155 passing yards, as well as his first interception of the season. The sophomore still might be the Buckeyes’ answer on the ground next week, too, as junior running back Carlos Hyde left Saturday’s game with an apparent knee injury.  “We’ve got to have a good week of practice,” he said. “We might lose Carlos Hyde for a week or two, I don’t know, MCL sprain.  I’m not sure how long he’ll be out.  Obviously I thought he was running the ball good.”  The Buckeyes drew first blood in the contest after Miller exploded for a 37-yard touchdown run on a quarterback keeper with 9:35 to play in the first quarter. The seven-play 71-yard drive put OSU up 7-0 early, but that lead wouldn’t last long. In the final minutes of the quarter, UCF seemed to finally hit its stride on offense, marching the ball down the field before a stingy Buckeyes defense forced the Knights to settle for a 28-yard field goal. OSU answered with another score of their own, after junior kicker Drew Basil knocked in a 24-yard chip shot, which once more pushed the Buckeyes’ lead to a touchdown. In front of a crowd of 104,745, though, the Knights again rallied – this for a game-tying touchdown. Thanks to back-to-back bursts of 20 and 48 rushing yards from UCF running back Storm Johnson, the Knights rocketed themselves into OSU territory before redshirt sophomore Blake Bortles carefully lobbed a 1-yard touchdown pass to freshman Justin Tukes. Johnson finished the game with 75 yards on 12 carries while Bortles was 25-of-41 passing for two touchdowns and three interceptions. Deadlocked at 10-10 with 6:45 left in the half to play, a once-raucous crowd appeared to fall quiet as they watched the Buckeyes’ lead – and momentum – slip away. On the ensuing Buckeyes drive, OSU senior fullback Zach Boren then fumbled the ball into the hands of a surging Knights team. With a Buckeyes squad now on its heels, it seemed UCF had the tools and the time to mount another drive for another score before the end of the half. Almost as quickly as OSU gave the ball away, though, they took it right back when redshirt senior Travis Howard intercepted an errant ball from Bortles with 3:18 remaining in the half. Howard’s third pick of the season was enough to ignite a late, eight-play, 48-yard drive for the Buckeyes that finished with Miller in the end zone for the second time in a half. It might have been just what OSU needed, too. Including Miller’s 6-yard touchdown scurry with 15 seconds left before halftime, the Buckeyes exploded for 21 unanswered points as OSU’s defense tightened things up and forced mistakes and turnovers from the Knights’ offense. Bortles was again intercepted by the Buckeyes after another poorly placed pass was tipped and picked off by redshirt linebacker Etienne Sabino. Miller and OSU’s offense made UCF pay for the mistake as the sophomore  quarterback found Stoneburner in the back of the south end zone for his first passing touchdown of the day. Miller then rushed for another score a little more than two minutes later. UCF wasn’t done yet and responded with a 14-play, 84-yard scoring drive of their own, netting the Knights a touchdown on fourth down after Bortles’ pass was hauled in by redshirt senior full back Billy Giovanetti. Down 31-16, UCF capitalized on the score and picked off Miller late in third quarter. Like before, though, the Knights gave their latest takeaway back to the Buckeyes as Bortles was intercepted by senior safety Orhian Johnson at the start of the fourth quarter. UCF came knocking again in the final seconds of the game, but OSU turned Bortles away to secure the 15-point victory.  With the loss, UCF moved to 0-7 all time against Big Ten teams and 0-1 against OSU. Meyer, though, said OSU isn’t as far along as he hoped they would be two games into the season. “Not where I thought we’d be.  Not where I thought we’d be.  I thought we’d be a little more explosive on offense and thought we’d get some pressure on the quarterback,” he said. “Offensive line I think is doing a decent job moving the ball.  Receivers are starting to build up a little bit but there’s other areas where I thought we’d be a little more explosive on offense.” The Buckeyes improved to 2-0 on the season and are scheduled to play California next Saturday at noon in Ohio Stadium. read more

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Ohio State Buckeyes turn to Corey Philly Brown to lead undefeated team

Wide receiver Corey ‘Philly’ Brown (10) celebrates a touchdown during a game against Iowa Oct. 19 at Ohio Stadium. OSU won, 34-24.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorWhen senior safety Christian Bryant went down with a broken ankle against Wisconsin, the Ohio State defense lost one of its most experienced players and a vocal leader.Although redshirt-senior safety Corey “Pitt” Brown has taken Bryant’s place on the field, it has been senior wide receiver Corey “Philly” Brown who filled the void in the locker room.“People will listen … In the past, I wouldn’t be able to say something to somebody that wasn’t in my position or on the offense and whatever. They just wouldn’t listen,” “Philly” Brown said after practice Wednesday. “But now, I mean, offense, defense, specials, I mean everybody listens to me now, so I know that I got the power of influence.”After the game against Iowa Oct. 19, coach Urban Meyer said “Philly” Brown has stepped up as a leader in the locker room since Bryant’s injury against Wisconsin Sept. 28.“When you lose a Christian Bryant, I keep looking for that next guy and I found him, I think. It’s No. 10, ‘Philly’ Brown,” Meyer said last Saturday. “The emotional guy that’s in that locker room and the kickoff team.”“Philly” Brown’s leadership role is a huge improvement over last season, said Meyer, who added that the wide receiver has become a player he can really rely on.“‘Philly’ Brown, I wouldn’t walk across the street from him last year. Now he’s a guy (who is) an incredible leader,” Meyer said after the game against Iowa. “I just looked at him: ‘Don’t let me down.’ He was phenomenal today. He was picking up the slack that (Christian Bryant left).”“Philly” Brown leads the team with 33 catches for 453 yards and six touchdowns so far this season.But Meyer said “Philly” Brown’s growth has been much more visible off the field.“He’s (180-degrees) to where he was. He’s an absolute leader of this team, unchallenged, unquestionable, maybe one of the leaders. He is one of the leaders, one of the top two or three leaders on the team. If you said that a year ago, we would have gotten in an argument, because that’s not who he was of the his development as a person, a player, as a student, I couldn’t say enough,” Meyer said.Even defensive coordinator Luke Fickell has been impressed with “Philly” Brown’s growth as a player and a leader.“Guys can say things at any point in time, but it’s the guys that with their actions are consistent and that’s what you’ve seen with ‘Philly,’ whether it’s in practice, whether it’s in the game,” Fickell said after the Iowa game.Against the Hawkeyes, the Buckeyes headed into halftime struggling, after scoring only 10 points, a season-low, and allowing the Hawkeyes to score on each of their first three drives.Junior wide receiver Devin Smith said moods were low in the locker room, but “Philly” Brown helped bring the energy back up heading into the second half.“We came in and you can kind of tell that the locker room was dead, just from everybody just really not saying nothing,” Smith said Monday. “Everyone just looking at each other … ‘Philly’ just stood up and basically just said, ‘This is not how we play.’ He was screaming and just letting it pour out, really. Basically he was saying, ‘This is not us, this is not how we play. We need to come out this half and really show them what we’re about.’”“Philly” Brown said as soon as the whistle blew for halftime, he wanted to talk to the team to let them know what needed to be done to secure the victory.“I walked up to coach Meyer and I asked him, I asked him if I could say something to the team before we went out … I can’t say the exact words that I used, but it was some bad words in there and I just told them what we looked like and what we needed to do,” “Philly” Brown said.After trailing, 17-10, at halftime, OSU outscored the Hawkeyes, 24-7, in the second half en route to the 34-24 victory.Meyer agreed and said “Philly” Brown’s intensity helped push the Buckeyes to victory.“He doesn’t just open his mouth up,” Meyer said. “It’s nice to have a team meeting and show that to the team. Because they heard what he said. And then it’s easy to pop your mouth off and go sit in the back and sulk or throw your helmet. And he didn’t, he went as hard as he could. That’s the sign of a really good leader.”The Buckeyes are scheduled to host Penn State Saturday at 8 p.m. and look to push their winning streak to 20 games.“Philly” Brown said having a vocal leader on the team is nice for the players because it changes up the routine.“When a coach screams, you can kind of blank them out and just not really try to hear what they’re saying,” “Philly” Brown said. “But when a person that’s actually out there on the field with you, grinding and in the war with you, when they say it, that’s when you know it’s real.” read more

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Jesse King stepping into leadership role for Ohio State lacrosse

Then-sophomore midfielder Jesse King (19) advances the ball during a game against Detroit Feb. 9, 2013, at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. OSU won, 14-8.Credit: Shelby Lum / Photo editorExpectations are mounting for the highest returning scorer on the Ohio State lacrosse team as the men look toward their final exhibition game.Junior midfielder Jesse King scored 32 goals for the Buckeyes last season and is looking to fill the void left by those who graduated. King was a 2014 Face-Off Yearbook Division I First Team All-American selection and was one of eight collegiate players to be selected to try out for Team Canada.A familiar name also invited to try out for Team Canada was OSU’s all-time leading goal scorer Logan Schuss, who moved on to the pros after the 2013 season.OSU coach Nick Myers said he believes Schuss helped with King’s maturation process.“I think he (King) would be the first to tell you that a guy like Logan was a big part of that,” Myers said. “Logan really took him under his wings and I think it was great for him to have that kind of mentor.”Over the offseason, OSU lost a couple of key seniors in Schuss as well as midfielder Dominique Alexander, and King said he knows he is going to have to step up in order to fill the leadership void they left.Fellow junior midfielder David Planning said King has been playing like a veteran ever since stepping foot on campus.“He was a leader and a captain from day one,” Planning said. “Whether it was on the field barking out orders with Logan and Dom, or outside of the field, it’s not new for him to pick up this leadership role this year.”Coming to OSU from Victoria, British Columbia, King still goes back home during the offseason and plays box lacrosse for the Victoria Shamrocks.Last summer, while playing with the junior team, King amassed 111 points in 15 games, good for third in the league despite playing fewer games because of OSU’s NCAA tournament run.However, it was his call up with the senior team for the Western Lacrosse Association playoffs that King said was inspiring.“When I got pulled up with the senior team, I met a lot of the guys that I dreamed about growing up,” King said. “It was cool to see how great they were to me, coming up as a young kid … it makes me reflect on guys coming up to our team and trying to be humble towards them.”Those experiences have translated well in Columbus. Senior midfielder Michael Italiano said the way King conducts himself on and off the field helps make his teammates around him better.“Jesse is a two-way kind of guy. He has a voice and knows the offense real well,” Italiano said. “He always comes in with a smile and a lot of energy … other players see that and they want to get better every day and follow his example.”This season, as OSU looks to defend its ECAC tournament title, Myers knows there could be more focus put on King, but he believes the Claremont Secondary School product is ready to take on the challenge.“Jesse is a very mature young man,” Myers said. “He is a guy that this year realizes that the spotlight is on him more and with that comes a bit more responsibility to manage his emotions and be the leader that we need him to be. I think he has really relished that and so far has done a nice job with it.”King is one of four returning players for OSU who totaled more than 20 points last season, and he does not see any reason why that number can’t increase this year.“We’ve got a great offense,” King said. “We have a lot of guys who are looking forward to step up … I’m excited for it.”Myers described King as a humble player who recognizes what it means to put on an OSU uniform each game and noted that the midfielder always puts his teammates before himself.“We talk about ‘we not me’ as one of our standards, and Jesse is a guy who exemplifies that,” Myers said. “He is a great teammate who really understands what Buckeye lacrosse is all about.”King and the Buckeyes are set to be back in action Saturday at noon, hosting the Robert Morris Colonials in their third and final exhibition game at the Woody Hayes Athletic Center. read more

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Mens Volleyball Ohio State sweeps Loyola to capture third straight MIVA tournament

Junior setter Sanil Thomas sets the ball during the second set of No. 3 Ohio State’s match against No. 8 Penn State on Jan. 28, 2018 in St. John Arena. The Buckeyes defeated the Nittany Lions in straight sets (25-19, 25-15, 25-17) to pick up their fifth win of the season. Credit: Aliyyah Jackson | Senior ReporterThe Ohio State men’s volleyball team clinched a third MIVA tournament title Saturday night in front of 1,364 fans at St. John Arena, defeating Loyola 3-0 and clinching a spot in the NCAA tournament. The victory also marked head coach Pete Hanson’s 700th career win.Though Ohio State has often struggled to put teams away up 2-0, the Buckeyes finished off the Ramblers in the third set 25-19 to claim the title. “Early in the season, we didn’t beat the better teams like BYU or UCLA,” Ohio State senior outside hitter Nicolas Szerszen said. “That kind of changed us in the RPI where we didn’t get a bid, so it was either all-in today or nothing.”Szerszen was everywhere he needed to be in both the front and back rows, ending the opening set with seven kills and five digs. Junior setter Sanil Thomas had 16 assists in the first set alone — six more than his 10.59 assist per game average. Though Loyola was able to avoid taking many attacking errors, the Ramblers struggled offensively, failing to find the right power or strategy to bring in the kills. Loyola’s top attacker, junior outside hitter Collin Mahan, struggled alongside his team, ending the first set with only one kill.The Buckeyes won the first set 25-20.In the second set, the Ramblers came onto the court with a renewed energy. Big on the net, Loyola intimidated Ohio State attackers into hitting the ball over Rambler blockers’ hands and out of bounds. After four attacking errors in a matter of seven plays from his team, Hanson called a timeout with his team trailing 9-5. A back-row attack from Szerszen won the Buckeyes the side-out and brought some elevated energy onto Ohio State’s side of the court. Hanson said that during the timeout, he told the Buckeyes to stay calm and maintain a consistent push against the Ramblers.“I heard this quote from the national team coach one time. It said, ‘You don’t have to be playing great volleyball all the time, but if you play good volleyball for a long period of time you’re going to be successful,’” Hanson said. “We just told them, ‘You don’t have to make the ultimate play. You don’t have to make the ultimate kill. Just be good, settle in and do what we have been doing.’”Senior outside hitter Maxime Hervoir and redshirt junior middle blocker Blake Leeson each registered a pair of kills with the Buckeyes trailing around the middle of the set to give Ohio State the advantage in the second set. Ohio State used the momentum to win the second set 25-23 and take a 2-0 lead.Szerszen said that given Ohio State’s struggles to put teams away after going up 2-0, he was a little bit worried going into the third set. “I got a little bit scared, I’m not going to lie. I saw some of the players getting a little relaxed, a little less involved than in the two first ones,” Szerszen said. “I made sure that some of the players kept going until the end. and were focused till the end and had a little bit of hate in them when they played. Because if you just go back and play to pay, you’re not going to be as efficient as if you just want to kill the opponent.”Loyola fell behind early to start off the third set. Though Rambler Mahan and senior opposite Ricky Gevis scored their fair share of kills with four each, Loyola could not keep up with the Buckeyes. Determined to end the match in the third set, the Buckeyes came out swinging with a hitting percentage of .500 and three-plus kills each from Szerszen, Leeson, Hanes and redshirt senior middle blocker Nick Laffin. A kill from Hervoir ended the match and sent Buckeye players running onto the court in celebration of the end of one tournament and the beginning of another.“It feels good to go there, and honestly, I think it’s gonna be good because we have nothing to lose,” he said. “All the other teams are technically ranked higher than us. We’re the underdog just like two years ago, and it’s always good to come in a game as the underdog.”At the end of the night, three Ohio State players were awarded MIVA All-Tournament Accolades — Thomas, redshirt freshman opposite Jake Hanes and Szerszen, who was named Most Outstanding Player. read more

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Football Ohio State starts to gain consistency on defense

Ohio State defensive coordinator Greg Schiano gives junior defensive end Jonathon Cooper (18) a high-five as he comes off the field in the fourth quarter of the game against Michigan State on Nov. 10. Ohio State won 26-6. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorMissed tackles have been an issue for Ohio State the past two weeks.In the 49-20 loss at Purdue and 36-31 win against Nebraska, the Buckeyes missed a combined 35 tackles, including 20 against the Boilermakers.On Saturday, they had only three in Ohio State’s 26-6 win against Michigan State.“That’s where we belong, in the single digits,” defensive coordinator Greg Schiano said. “It’s amazing when we do that, when we tackle well, how things go better.”Things went better for the Buckeyes in their 20-point victory. Ohio State held the Spartans to a 37.5 completion percentage through the air, and gave up 54 rushing yards on the game, 47 of which came on one play by redshirt freshman quarterback Rocky Lombardi.Redshirt junior defensive tackle Robert Landers said it was the first complete game he felt the defense has played all season.“You know it did a lot for our confidence,” Landers said. “There’s still a lot of things that we could have done better, you know we put together a complete game, but when you strive for perfection, it’s always something that you could have done better.”Even with the complete game, Ohio State’s defensive numbers did not jump off the page.Of the safety and three turnovers Michigan State allowed, only one was forced by the Buckeyes when redshirt junior defensive tackle Dre’Mont Jones hit redshirt junior quarterback Brian Lewerke while he was throwing, allowing the ball to land in the hands of redshirt freshman safety Shaun Wade.Ohio State did not have a sack all game, and only two tackles for loss.Junior defensive end Jonathon Cooper said the pass rush does not always depend on the stats.“I feel like as long as we’re getting pressures on the quarterback and affecting him in any sort of way than we’re doing our job,” Cooper said. “Even though the stats and the sacks aren’t popping up but we’re getting there effectively and efficiently, then that’s just as effective on our football team.”In nearly every week, head coach Urban Meyer says in his postgame press conference that the defense is nowhere near where it needs to be, that there are various areas where the defense can improve.After the Michigan State win, he said the same thing again, and Landers said the same thing on Tuesday.“I feel like as a defense we put together a solid game,” Landers said. “When you’re an elite competitor how we are here, you never really satisfied, so you always find something that you can fix, because there’s always something that can be better.”But after this game, there was more of a feeling that the defense was turning a corner.Holding the Spartans to two field goals on the road, shutting them out in the second half while missing just three tackles, the Buckeyes have more to hold their head high on than any other game in the past month.Schiano said the defense will “be close to full force” in terms of health on Saturday. Cooper said he thinks the defense will only improve, even after the performance in East Lansing, Michigan.“It gives us a lot of confidence, we feel like we’re playing the way that we should,” Cooper said. “We feel like we’ve finally gotten into a rhythm and a flow, and I mean with us rolling like that, and us going like that, all we can go is up.” read more

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Having no friends could be as deadly as smoking Harvard University finds

first_img“Social connectedness displays a significant association with fibrinogen.“If there is indeed an independent causal relationship between social isolation and fibrinogen and, subsequently, heart disease and stroke, then policies and interventions that improve social connectedness may have health effects even beyond the well-known benefits of improved economic conditions.” A man suffers a heart attack Having no friends could be as deadly as smoking, researchers at Harvard University have suggested, after discovering a link between loneliness and the levels of a blood-clotting protein which can cause heart attacks and stroke.Social isolation is known to activate the ‘fight or flight’ stress signal which increases levels of protein fibrinogen in anticipation of injury and blood loss.But too much fibrinogen is bad for health, raising blood pressure and causing the build-up of fatty deposits in the arteries.Harvard researchers compared levels of the blood-clotting protein with the numbers of friends and family in a person’s social network and found a striking correlation. As the number of social connections fell, the level of fibrinogen rose. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. The protein fibrinogen helps blood to clot but can lead to heart attacks and strokes if too much is produced Credit:Alamy  People with just five people in their social network had 20 per cent higher levels fibrinogen than those with 25. Having 10-12 fewer friends had the same impact on levels as taking up smoking.It is thought that social isolation leaves people feeling threatened and vulnerable which triggers an ongoing ‘fight or flight’ response which can be lethal in the long term.“Measurement of the whole social network can provide information about an individual’s cardiac risk that is not necessarily apparent to the individual herself,” said lead author Dr David Kim of Harvard Medical School. A woman smoking Previously loneliness has been linked to a compromised immune system, high blood pressure, and ultimately, premature death.A recent study by the University of York found that lonely people are around 30 per cent more likely to suffer a stroke or heart disease, two of the leading causes of death in Britain. But the reasons have remained unclear. Some researchers thought it was simply that there were fewer people to notice when a person was ill or encourage them to take care of their health.Dr Nicole Valtorta who led the University of York research said: “These findings are consistent with a growing body of research indicating that social relationships are important for health.“Our recent review, based on self-reports of social relationships, found that individuals who felt lonely or who were socially isolated had on average a 30 per cent increased risk of developing coronary heart disease or having a stroke. “It may be that some of the effect observed by the authors of the article is a result of people’s social relationships being affected by poor health. To build on this study, future studies are needed to investigate whether interventions that tackle social isolation have an effect on health.” Having fewer friends appeared to have a similar impact on fibrinogen levels as smokingCredit:incamerastock / Alamy  But although loneliness is often viewed as a problem for older people, a recent study by the Mental Health Foundation found that 18- to 34-year-olds were likely to feel lonely more often than over-55s.Dr Mike Knapton, the associate medical director at the British Heart Foundation, said: “BHF-funded research has already identified that social isolation can have a negative impact on your heart health.“Using a new measure of social connectedness, this study identifies an association between how connected we are to our family and friends and our levels of a blood clotting protein, called fibrinogen, which can increase your risk of suffering from a heart attack or stroke.”We can’t conclude from this research that social isolation directly causes heart problems. But the possibility that social factors can affect a protein in our blood, like fibrinogen, is an interesting prospect for further research in this area.”The research was published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B biological sciences journal. In January, the Local Government Association said loneliness should be treated as a ‘major health issue’, while charity Age UK claim the issue “blights the lives” of over a million older people.last_img read more

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