Notre Dame provost to step down next July

first_imgUniversity provost Thomas Burish will step down July 1, the administration announced in a press release Aug. 1. The date marks the end of Burish’s third five-year term in the position.As provost, Burish is charge of all academic operations at Notre Dame, placing him at the head of all colleges, schools and institutes, as well as admissions, financial aid and advising. Provost is the second highest-ranking administrative role at Notre Dame, behind only University president.During his 14 years at Notre Dame, Burish has expanded the University’s academic offerings, with a particular focus on its research and graduate programs, the release said.From 2006 to 2017, investment in research rose from $79 million to $212 million. Likewise, investment in graduate studies “more than doubled,” helping fund 15 new programs. According to the release, this growth has contributed to a 25% increase in Graduate School applications.Need-based aid has also grown from $60 million to $154 million under Burish. The student body has become more diverse, as well — the number of undergraduates who are either international students or students of color has risen from less than a quarter to more than a third.In addition, Burish’s tenure saw the establishment of the Harper Cancer Research Institute in partnership with Indiana University-South Bend, as well as the creation of Innovation Park. The University also underwent a series of efforts to expand its global reach with the creation of Notre Dame International in 2010 and the Keough School of Global Affairs in 2014. Global Gateways were opened in Beijing, Dublin, Jerusalem, London and Rome, as well.The release named the Inspired Leadership Initiative, an academic program for retirees, as another notable achievement under Burish. The program graduated its first class in May.Board of Trustees chairman John Brennan said Burish was instrumental to a number of University initiatives during his time at Notre Dame.“It is difficult to overstate the positive impact Tom has had on our University as provost,”  Brennan said in the release. “For nearly 15 years, he has guided the strategy and investments that enhanced our faculty and strengthened our scholarship to the great benefit of our undergraduate and graduate students, created new research programs and partnerships and significantly advanced Notre Dame’s academic reputation among the nation’s leading universities.”As provost, Burish has helped make the University’s mission manifest, Jenkins said.“Words cannot adequately express my gratitude and respect for Tom’s outstanding leadership, his visionary leadership of the academy, his commitment to our Catholic mission and his tireless efforts to make Notre Dame a truly great and truly distinctive university,” he said in the release. “Tom has been a transformative provost for Notre Dame, and for 15 years an invaluable colleague. He and his wife Pam have become dear friends. We have all benefited tremendously from his intellect, judgment, determination and selfless devotion to Notre Dame and its mission.”Originally from Peshtigo, Wisconsin, Bush graduated summa cum laude from Notre Dame in 1972. Before returning to the University, he served as provost at Vanderbilt for 10 years and as the president of Washington and Lee University for three.In the release, Burish extended his gratitude for the opportunity to serve the University.“It has been a great joy and privilege to return to my alma mater as provost and to be a part of Notre Dame’s distinctive excellence as a Catholic research university,” he said. “I have been honored to work with and learn from Father John and the Trustees, and with faculty, staff and administrative colleagues who have displayed ever-rising standards of service and excellence. And it has been a labor of love to work with students whose inspiring talent and principled goals constantly renew my hope in the future. In a career filled with countless blessings, serving the Notre Dame family is a gift which has given great meaning to my life.”According to the release, the University will soon launch an international search for Burish’s replacement. A committee, chaired by Jenkins, will create a pool of potential candidates. The committee will feature faculty members and a student representative from the Academic Council.The committee will recommend a candidate to the Board of Trustees, which will then make a final selection.A version of this story was published Aug. 1.Tags: Charles and Jill Fischer Provost, provost, Thomas Burishlast_img read more

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A new day for Florida’s trial courts

first_imgA new day for Florida’s trial courts August 1, 2004 Managing Editor Regular News A new day for Florida’s trial courts Recounting the struggle to establish the framework and obtain funding Mark D. Killian Managing Editor Court officials who labored long and hard during the regular and special legislative sessions of 2003 left Tallahassee that summer “absolutely believing” that they would never get adequate funding for Revision 7 to Art. V when the state took over trial court funding the following year.“We truly believed that short of a miracle, the trial courts would be going backward on July 1, 2004, certainly not forward, and they might not even stay the same,” Judge Susan Schaeffer, who chaired the Trial Court Budget Commission, told those gathered at the Supreme Court July 1 to mark the occasion.But thanks to the hard work of legislators, the state’s judges, court administrators, The Florida Bar, the governor, Florida’s business community, and others, the tide turned. When July 1 of this year finally came, Schaeffer said confidently that all Florida citizens now have access to the same essential trial court services no matter where they live.“This is what the citizens of Florida voted for when they passed Revision 7 to Art. V of Florida’s Constitution in 1998,” Schaeffer said, and what the entire court system worked so hard to achieve.Immediate past Chief Justice Harry Lee Anstead said the implementation of Revision 7 was the judicial system’s greatest challenge since the state’s modern trial court system was created in the 1970s and proclaimed the effort was Florida’s judges’ “finest hour.”“It is the first time that [the judges] had to rise in the defense of the entire branch. . . they put aside their differences. . . they approached this issue with great passion,” Anstead said. “We have seen the strength when we stand together.”Schaeffer said when the final conference was over, and the compromises reached, the TCBC had:• Asked for 241.5 employees for court administration; and got 241.5 employees for court administration.• Asked for 212.5 case managers; and got 212.5 case managers.• Asked for 237.5 masters, hearing officers, and secretarial staff; and got 231.5 masters, hearing officers, and secretarial staff. •Asked for146.5 mediation employees; and got 117 employees, which was still 27 more employees than the counties were funding under the previous funding system.• Asked for 260.5 court reporters; and got 260.5 court reporters.• Asked for 102 court interpreters; and got 102 court interpreters.• Asked for 14 expert witness employees; and got 14 expert witness employees.“The [Office of the State Courts Administrator] said they needed 18.5 employees to take care of their extra responsibilities due to Revision 7, and they got 18.5 new employees,” Schaeffer said.In all, the courts received $22 million in expense dollars for the total budget.“We believed when we left the 2003 legislative session that we needed a miracle in 2004 to make Revision 7 work,” Schaeffer said. “As you can see, we got that miracle.”Justice Barbara Pariente said when she realized she would be taking over as chief justice on July 1, she felt a great deal of anxiety knowing it was the same day the new funding scheme would kick in.“I kept on thinking, ‘Is this going to be what Y2K did not turn out to be — a disaster?’” Pariente said. Thanks to the collective effort of everybody who toiled to make the funding transition work, a strong base is now provided that “we can now build on and make better and better for all of our citizens.”“So we stand here today together — the Bar and the Bench — to commemorate Revision 7, on this the first day of July, 2004,” Immediate Past Bar President Miles McGrane said. “It has been a successful sojourn, and the Bar is now ready to go the distance.” On January 12, 1999, Chief Justice Major Harding established what was eventually a 15-person group, called the Article V Funding Steering Committee. One of its first tasks was to inventory all of the costs the counties were presently spending, and to determine what part of those costs should become part of the state budget. Schaeffer said when the Steering Committee saw the inventory, it was the first time that judges had seen all the staffing, equipment, and programs that the other circuits had, or didn’t have.“Believe me, it was a real eye-opener,” Schaeffer said. “Some circuits had day care services provided by court employees in the courthouse; judges in one circuit had their own personal bailiffs; judges in another had two judicial assistants per judge; one circuit paid for judges’ Bar dues; another paid for judges’ robes; and another paid to have the judges’ robes dry cleaned. Some circuits were in the business of doing urinalysis testing for drug cases and even paternity cases. One even had a program for the homeless. These were the circuits we dubbed the ‘haves.’”Sadly, Judge Schaeffer said, other circuits were dubbed the “have nots” where the judges literally had to pay for their own pens.“Judge Stan Blake from Miami regularly presented Judy Pittman, chief judge of the 14th Circuit, one of the ‘have not’ circuits, all the pens he could gather up from the circuit judges conferences,” Schaeffer said.The “have not” circuits had little court administration — most of it was provided by employees of the county. The ‘have nots’ had never seen a general master. They had no meaningful case managers. They had few mediation programs.At the end of the day, Schaeffer said, the TCBC said no to day care services, personal bailiffs, more than one judicial assistant per judge, to paying Bar dues, to buying robes, and dry cleaning.“We said no to the court being involved in drug and paternity testing,” Schaeffer said. “We said while the homeless were a definite problem in every community, the courts should not be in the homeless business. We said yes to pens that don’t leak. We said yes to court administration, case managers, general masters, and child support hearing officers, and mediation.”Those elements became known as the “equity elements,” and for Revision 7 to be successful, all circuits would need an appropriate amount of employees and dollars for each of those elements, she said.In 2000, then Chief Justice Charles Wells traveled to every circuit in the state to rally the state’s judges to become involved.“Unfortunately, the message was boring,” Schaeffer said. “I remember telling Justice Wells and Ken Palmer [former state courts administrator] on more than one occasion that the message, good though it was, was the best sleep medicine money could buy. Even a visit from Chief Justice Wells could not stir up the trial judges to really care about Revision 7.”Schaeffer said the judges seemed to believe that the third branch of government would be well taken care of by the other two branches, if for no other reason than they were the third branch of government.In 2003, they were in for a rude awakening.Schaeffer said up until 2003, the legislature had done very little to deal with Revision 7. She recalled having lunch in Orlando with Judge Belvin Perry and then House Speaker Tom Feeney in 2002.“We asked Mr. Feeney if it wasn’t time to get going on Revision 7. His answer, ‘Not on my watch,’” Schaeffer said. “President [John] MacKay must have felt the same way. So while Revision 7 was actually supposed to be phased in over six years, that never happened.”Therefore, Schaeffer said, Revision 7 was to be on President Jim King’s and Speaker Johnnie Byrd’s watch, “whether they wanted it or not.”The 2003 legislative session was the TCBC’s first full indoctrination into a legislative session.“In our first year in Tallahassee, full-time during the session, we were, for the most part, rank amateurs when it came to lobbying.”Schaeffer said getting the legislature to agree to fund the elements the TCBC considered crucial was difficult, to say the least.“The legislators thought we didn’t need court administration — the clerk of court could provide whatever court administration we needed,” Schaeffer said. “They thought the OSCA was unnecessary — the Justice Administrative Commission could surely provide whatever services OSCA provided to the trial courts. They didn’t want to believe that we needed masters and hearing officers — they thought everyone who came to court should see a judge.”Schaeffer also said many in the legislature believed that case managers were only for specialty courts, which they had determined, except for drug court, they were not going to fund.“Fortunately, cooler heads eventually prevailed,” Schaeffer said. “Case managers, although the last element to be added, were finally included as an element of the trial courts in a compromise Revision 7 bill between the House and Senate.”the the time the 2003 special legislative sessions were over, the lawmakers had passed HB 113-A, which Schaeffer called a good Revision 7 bill that identified all of the equity elements the TCBC had proposed for state funding.“However, we had been beaten to death on our budget for that year,” Schaeffer said. “The FY 2003-04 trial court budget was a definite failure.”While Schaeffer said she could not pinpoint exactly what turned the tide the following spring, she shared some of her thoughts as to why the courts ultimately succeeded:• “Maybe I got the trial judges out of their slumber mode when I threatened all of them in a speech at both the county and circuit judges’ plenary sessions that if they did certain things, or didn’t do other things during the 2004 legislative session, I would hunt them down and strangle them.” Schaeffer commented that one judge who heard her speech evaluated it by remarking, “I just don’t think it is right for one judge to threaten to strangle another judge. I am afraid of you.”“Maybe it was fear that got the rank-and-file trial judges working harder for the cause in 2004,” she joked, adding “that was a good day.”• Chief Justice Anstead worked tirelessly for the trial courts, visiting editorial boards in both 2003 and 2004 to get the trial courts’ message to the people.• Maybe it was because the Bar got really involved in 2004. “I think the leaders of the Bar fully understood that the Bar could be mortally wounded if the trial courts were underfunded,” she said.• Maybe it was because the business community became heavily involved in 2004, finally realizing that an underfunded court system would delay their business cases most of all.“Associated Industries of Florida actually offered their very able lobbyists, and $15 million from the workers’ compensation trust fund to help the trial courts get adequate funding,” Schaeffer said. “That caused some legislative heads to turn, I can tell you.”• Maybe the Tax Watch Report caused the legislature to sit up and take notice that the courts needed more funding.• Maybe it was because the TCBC, the conferences, the chief judges, and the rank-and-file judges spoke with one voice, and didn’t go off in different directions in 2004.“Whatever the reason or reasons, the governor gave us a good start in his budget; the Senate improved on the governor’s budget; and the House improved on the Senate’s budget,” Schaeffer said.All in all, Schaeffer said, when the 2004 legislative session was over, the citizens who had voted for Revision 7 had what they voted for — adequate state funding for essential trial court services for every citizen no matter where they lived.“There are no more ‘have not’ courts — they are all ‘haves,’” Schaeffer said. “Revision 7 is fully implemented, and implemented well. We have justice for all Floridians.” The Road to Revision 7last_img read more

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Trump orders NAFCU-backed regulatory relief for economic recovery

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr President Donald Trump Tuesday signed an executive order requiring agencies to take measures to eliminate, modify, waive, or exempt burdensome regulatory requirements in efforts to help support economic recovery from the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. NAFCU has continuously advocated for regulatory relief for credit unions as they work to meet the needs of their members affected by the pandemic.The order includes independent agencies, such as the NCUA, CFPB and Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), and encourages agencies to speed up the rulemaking process by moving some proposed rulemakings to interim final rules with immediate effect.The order also directs agencies to take additional steps to provide coronavirus pandemic-related relief, practice enforcement discretion, and provide a report on their efforts to the Office of Management and Budget and others in the administration.Additionally, the order establishes a “Regulatory Bill of Rights,” 10 basic principles of fairness that will govern the administrative enforcement and adjudication process.last_img read more

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Body Found Burning in Manorville Woods, Cops Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The body of an unidentified man was found on fire in a wooded area of Manorville on Thursday afternoon, Suffolk County police said.Officers and firefighters responded to a call from a passing driver who made the discovery off Wading River Road in the Otis Pike Preserve at 1:45 p.m., police said. The witness first reported the incident to Riverhead Town Police, police said.The man was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. His remains will be taken to the Suffolk County Medical Examiner’s office, where an autopsy will be conducted to determine the person’s identity and cause of death, police said.Homicide and Arson Squad detectives are continuing the investigation, although it wasn’t immediately clear whether the incident was criminal or accidental in nature, a police spokeswoman said.last_img read more

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First Lady Frances Wolf Unveils Governor’s Residence Rain Garden During Annual Earth Day Celebration

first_img Environment,  First Lady Frances Wolf,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Addressing the need for better storm water management along the Susquehanna River, First Lady Frances Wolf today officially unveiled a newly constructed rain garden at the Governor’s Residence. The First Lady joined several of the state’s top environmental leaders to showcase the rain garden, as well as other green features on the property, as part of the Residence’s second annual Earth Day celebration.“We are proud of the steps taken here at the Governor’s Residence to conserve energy, minimize waste, and provide more means to sustainable living,” Mrs. Wolf said. “In working with our partners throughout state government and across the commonwealth, we’ve been able to collaborate on many levels – from projects like the rain garden and new vegetable planters, to our honey-producing apiaries, to the solar panels on the roof — all of these things represent a commitment to protecting the environment and hopefully serve as example of easy initiatives we can all bring to our own backyards.”Joining the First Lady Wolf were Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Secretary Cindy Adams Dunn and Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Patrick McDonnell, as well as more than 40 young people working for DCNR’s Outdoor Corps program, who presented the First Lady with wood planters they constructed for use in the Residence gardens.Secretary Dunn invited listeners to visit several DCNR-staffed stations on the Residence lawn that addressed the value of watershed education, soil improvement and the planting of tree buffers along waterways. Also, the Bureau of Forestry’s Mira Lloyd Dock Resource Management Center supplied free white pine seedlings for visitors to plant when they returned home.“As Governor Wolf noted in his 2018 Earth Day proclamation, ‘Everyone Plays a Part in Keeping Pennsylvania Clean,’ and this gathering helps us all learn what we can do to lessen impact on the environment,” said Dunn. “Those who work with me in the nearby building named for a conservation icon — Rachel Carson — are committed to a cleaner, greener Earth. I invite you to tap their knowledge and enthusiasm. ““Every day is Earth Day at DEP,” said Secretary McDonnell. “We’re passionate about our work to educate and partner with citizens, schools, towns, farms, community organizations, businesses, and state leaders to protect Pennsylvania’s environment. As the First Lady shows, if everyone does a little, together we get a lot done for the benefit of all who appreciate the outdoors.”Rain gardens are designed to lessen storm water runoff in an area with poor drainage issues or wash-outs. During the summer of 2017, Penn State student Zoe Roane-Hopkins joined DCNR’s Landscape Design Section as an intern to oversee planning, design and maintenance of the Residence rain garden. Residence staff provided the materials, funding for plantings and equipment assistance for preparing and planting.Additional green features of the Governor’s Residence building and grounds include:Rain barrels. The Residence utilizes several rain barrels placed strategically throughout the property to prevent storm water runoff.Solar panels on south-facing roof of Residence. The panels provide not only a source of clean electricity to the Residence, but also an uninterrupted power supply of renewable energy for critical communications systems.Ground source heat pump (GSHP) system, which replaced existing electric resistance heating. GSHP systems, also called geothermal heat pumps, concentrate existing heat, rather than burning fossil fuels to release energy. The GSHP system provides heat as well as supplemental cooling to the Residence.Reduction of paper products where possible. This includes a major reduction in the use of paper plates, paper and plastic cups, and bottled water daily at events held at the Residence.Recycling of glass, plastic, paper and cardboard.Herb and vegetable gardens. The Residence is currently home to an herb garden and raised vegetable beds, the produce from which is used for cooking at the Residence.Hydroponic garden. To address the need for fresh herbs and vegetables that do not grow well on the Residence grounds or are needed for events in harsh winter months, Residence staff recently built an indoor hydroponic garden.Working and observation beehives. In additional to honey-producing beehives, the Residence installed observation beehives in 2017 so children can view the honey-making process and learn how important bees are to the environment and how the honey for culinary purposes at the Residence.Details on the benefits of rain gardens and rain barrels, suggested plantings and other information can be found here. First Lady Frances Wolf Unveils Governor’s Residence Rain Garden During Annual Earth Day Celebration SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img April 23, 2018last_img read more

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Renovations on the rise

first_imgGet ready to see more tradies on in street over the next two-to-three years.There’ll be more tradies on the go if the latest research by the Housing Industry Association (HIA) is correct.The July 2017 edition of the HIA Renovation’s Roundup report revealed a steady rise in renovation activity is expected over the next two-to-three years.“The home renovations market will return to growth this year,” HIA principal economist, Tim Reardon, said.HIA forecasts for the sector nationally predict growth of around 2.6 per cent in 2018, followed by another rise of around 2.3 per cent in 2019.Mr Reardon said renovations had taken a back seat to the soaring new home construction sector over last 12-months.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor3 hours ago“We expect this to change this year and that the market will again experience growth as the number of detached houses that are reaching the key renovations age is increasing,” Mr Reardon said.He said gains will also be driven by a backlog of work.“With new home building set to decline over the next couple of years, the gradual strengthening of renovations activity is coming at the right time,” Mr Reardon said.In Queensland, preliminary data showed renovation activity had fallen by six per cent during the March 2017 quarter, and was 13.9 per cent lower than at the same time last year.However the HIA outlook for the future of our state’s renovation industry was more bullish.“During 2017, renovations activity in Queensland is expected to expand by 0.6 per cent and growth is expected to accelerate to 8.8 per cent in 2018,” the HIA report said.Follow Kieran Clair on Twitter at @kieranclairlast_img read more

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WorleyParsons adds AFW’s UK North Sea operations to its portfolio

first_imgEnergy services company Wood has completed the sale of Amec Foster Wheeler’s UK North Sea operations to WorleyParsons for a cash consideration of £227 million. To remind, Wood completed its previously announced acquisition of Amec Foster Wheeler on October 9. On the same day, an agreement was made between Amec Foster Wheeler and WorleyParsons for the sale of the majority of AFW’s UK North Sea operations.In 2016, the business contributed revenues of £740 million and trading profit of £43 million to Amec Foster Wheeler. It consists of the majority of Amec Foster Wheeler’s UK upstream oil and gas business located in the UK and serving UK customers, excluding its commissioning business, qedi. The sale was one of the conditions that Wood had to fulfill in order to resolve competition concerns and complete its acquisition of Amec Foster Wheeler.On Friday, October 27 Wood confirmed the completion of the sale of those operations, adding that the cash proceeds would be used to reduce net debt.WorleyParsons on Monday also confirmed the completion of the acquisition of AFW Oil and Gas UK Limited, noting that the transaction enhances its global Maintenance, Modifications and Operations business. Namely, AFW has over 3,000 employees in seven offices in the UK and the Middle East and is a service provider within the MMO market on the UK continental shelf.WorleyParsons pointed out that strategic benefits of adding AFW UK team to the group include robust entry for WorleyParsons into the UK North Sea as a profitable market leader; acceleration of WorleyParsons’ corporate strategy to build a world class global MMO capability in the Integrated Solutions business line; combines AFW UK’s capabilities and strong track record of global expansion with WorleyParsons’ global network which together will create a genuine global MMO business; and the addition of AFW UK’s execution capability, experience and mature systems and processes will support efficient global MMO execution.“I look forward to welcoming our new colleagues as together we develop our plans for an exciting new future,”  said Andrew Wood, CEO WorleyParsons.Offshore Energy Today Stafflast_img read more

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Serie A: Ronaldo sets goal record as Verona stun Juventus in late comeback

first_img Loading… Cristiano Ronaldo broke another record on Saturday night but it was not enough to claim victory for Juventus, who collapsed at Hellas Verona.Hellas Verona ignited the Serie A title race with a dramatic 2-1 win over champions Juventus on Saturday, scoring twice in the final 14 minutes after Cristiano Ronaldo had netted in a 10th successive league game. Read Also: Ronaldo’s girlfriend shows off dance skills, hosts music bash in ItalyRonaldo eventually broke the deadlock when he was played in over the top by Rodrigo Bentancur, the Portugal great holding off Amir Rrahmani before a stepover gained him just enough space to clinically pick out the bottom-left corner.But Borini swept home an excellent finish to equalise 14 minutes from time, capitalising on Miralem Pjanic’s error, and Pazzini emphatically made the most of a penalty late on – Bonucci penalised for deflecting Kumbulla’s header on to the bar with his arm, and Juve failed to mount a response.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Ronaldo had seemingly secured Juve a hard-fought win with his fine individual goal 25 minutes from time, but Verona – who certainly had their fair share of opportunities – levelled through Fabio Borini and then astonishingly completed the turnaround with a Giampaolo Pazzini penalty.An action-packed first half brought a host of chances but no goals, as Marash Kumbulla had an early header disallowed and Juve hit crossbar and post respectively through Douglas Costa and Ronaldo.The second period was generally a cagier affair until Ronaldo claimed a club record in the 65th minute, taking his Serie A tally to 20 for the season, but Borini scored for only the second time this term and Pazzini converted from 12 yards to give Juve’s title challengers Inter and Lazio a boost after Leonardo Bonucci handled.A gripping start saw both sides go close early on, with Davide Faraoni forcing Wojciech Szczesny into an acrobatic stop before Costa’s rasping drive hit the bar at the other end.Kumbulla then had a marginal offside call deny him the opening goal in 21st minute, with a VAR review sparing Juve.Despite Verona’s undoubted threat, Juventus continued to worry them at the back – Ronaldo almost putting the Old Lady ahead three times in the nine minutes before half-time, including with a 20-yard effort that hit the right-hand post. Promoted ContentCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayTop 10 Most Romantic Nations In The WorldWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?There’s Only 1 Such A Coin In The World Left In Private HandsThis Is The First Meme Ever, According To The InternetBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemReal Faces Of The Women From World Famous PaintingsIt Might Be Quentin Tarantino’s Last MovieThe Top 9 Oddest Underwater Discoveries No One Can Explain6 Best Supercars In Movies You’ll Dream To Drive At Least Once6 Best ’90s Action Movies To Watch TodayWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?last_img read more

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AquaTrojans Win Host Relay Invitational

first_imgCourtesy of AquaTrojans Coach Brandon Loveless. The East Central AquaTrojans take both titles at the 2016 East Central Relay Invitational on Saturday in St. Leon.The scores were.  Girls: East Central 74, Greenwood 60, New Palestine 53, Connersville 50, Greensburg 47, Lawrence Central 22.Boys.  East Central 83, Greenwood 60, Connersville 47, New Palestine 47, Greensburg 35, Lawrence Central 28.Relay winners for East Central were. Girls 200 Medley Relay (Hannah Weber, Lydia Weber, Olivia Nixon, Ashley Bortlein), Boys 200 Medley Relay (Ethen Witte, Klay Shipman, Jackson Ketcham, Cai Fox), Girls 400 Medley Relay (Alexis deLong, Hannah Weber, Lydia Weber), Boys 200 Medley Relay (Jacob Weber, Klay Shipman, Alex Pruitt), Boys 1000 Freestyle Relay (Gavin Daniels, Cai Fox), Girls 375 Crescendo Relay (Jordan Marro, Felicity Wray, Ashley Bortlein, Mackenzie Schantz), Boys 375 Crescendo Relay (Gavin Daniels, Noah Arnold, Alex Ketcham, Jacob Weber), Boys 150 Fly Relay (Jackson Ketcham, Ethen Witte, Jacob Weber), Girls 150 Backstroke Relay (Alexis deLong, Hannah Weber, Olivia Nixon), Boys 150 Breaststroke Relay (Chandler Witte, Alex Ketcham, Klay Shipman), Boys 400 Freestyle Relay (Cai Fox, Alex Pruitt, Chandler Witte, Jackson Ketcham).EC Girls are now 12-0 (6-0 EIAC).  EC Boys are 10-0 (6-0 EIAC).East Central travels north on Thursday to face Shelbyville at 5:30.GO AQUATROJANS!!!!!last_img read more

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IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through March 21

first_imgKarl Kustoms Northern SportMods – 1. Chase Rudolf, Prole, Iowa, 451; 2. Mark Harrison, Coolidge, Ariz., 342; 3. Cole Carver, Apache Junction, Ariz., 324; 4. David Jones, Chandler, Ariz., 315; 5. Keith Brown Jr., Pittsburg, Calif., 300; 6. Mark Madrid, Laveen, Ariz., 282; 7. Michael Egurola Jr., Tucson, Ariz., 270; 8. Taylor Kuehl, Cave Creek, Ariz., 261; 9. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, and Brady Bjella, Williston, N.D., both 257; 11. Heath Dry, Phoenix, Ariz., 244; 12. Kelly Jacobson, Fargo, N.D., 242; 13. Tate Johnson, Homestead, Montana, 240; 14. Ty Weidner, Chandler, Ariz., 233; 15. Ethan Braaksma, Newton, Iowa, 224; 16. Ryan Moser, Englewood, Colo., 219; 17. Bryan Miller, Glendale, Ariz., 208; 18. Brandyn Johnson, Mesa, Ariz., 203; 19. Justin Svoboda, David City, Neb., 194; 20. Bo Partain, Casa Grande, Ariz., 183.  IMCA Modifieds – 1. Ricky Thornton Jr., Adel, Iowa, 395; 2. Hunter Marriott, Brookfield, Mo., and Kollin Hibdon, Pahrump, Nev., both 345; 4. Zachary Madrid, Tucson, Ariz., 334; 5. Don Gumke, Jamestown, N.D., 284; 6. David Goode Jr., Copperas Cove, Texas, 279; 7. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 278; 8. Ryan Roath, Peoria, Ariz., 274; 9. Jeff Stafford Jr., Wittmann, Ariz., 258; 10. Tyler Mecl, Queen Creek, Ariz., 248; 11. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 240; 12. Jason Noll, Peoria, Ariz., 233; 13. Drew Armstrong, Benton, Ark., 231; 14. Jacob O’Neil, Tucson, Ariz., 223; 15. Chris Elliott, Abilene, Texas, and Brent Schlafmann, Bismarck, N.D., both 219; 17. Jeff Taylor, Cave City, Ark., 215; 18. D.J. Shannon, Merced, Calif., 213; 19. Clint Reichenbach, Santa Maria, Calif., 211; 20. Casey Arneson, Fargo, N.D., 203.  IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 431; 2. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 397; 3. George Fronsman, Surprise, Ariz., 337; 4. Jason Batt, Harker Heights, Texas, 333; 5. Cody Center, Mesa, Ariz., 328; 6. Dean Abbey, Roanoke, Texas, 301; 7. Lonnie Foss, Glendale, Ariz., 281; 8. Gary Williams, Bonham, Texas, 269; 9. Tyler Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, 251; 10. Shelby Williams, Bonham, Texas, 247; 11. Joey McCullough, Phoenix, Ariz., and Kyle Falck, Decorah, Iowa, both 245; 13. Bryan Schutte, Wayne, Okla., 236; 14. Dennis Bissonnette, Stephenville, Texas, 234; 15. Douglas Kennemer, Rhome, Texas, 233; 16. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 222; 17. Kyle Pfeifer, Hill City, Kan., 220; 18. Gene Henrie, Cedar City, Utah, 213; 19. Curt Lund, Redwood Falls, Minn., 210; 20. A.J. Dancer, Red Rock, Texas, 208.  IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Joe Peterson, Chandler, Ariz., 182; 2. Joe Vlasity, Glendale, Ariz., 174; 3. Bradley Stafford, Glendale, Ariz., 143; 4. Nathan DeRagon, Peoria, Ariz., 139; 5. Kyle Cardinal, Paradise Valley, Ariz., 137; 6. Adam Goff, Minot, N.D., 116; 7. Max Zachrison, Surprise, Ariz., 104; 8. Scott Tenney, Yuma, Ariz., 74; 9. Joshua Cordova, Yuma, Ariz., 39; 10. Jason Beshears, Yuma, Ariz., 37; 11. Francisco Cordova, Yuma, Ariz., 36; 12. Jason Penny, Yuma, Ariz., and Richard Bennett, Mesa, Ariz., both 35; 14. Rick Hibbard, Yuma, Ariz., 34; 15. Susie Mikkelson, Surprise, Ariz., 32; 16. Scott Jeffery, Yuma, Ariz., 31; 17. David Callis, Yuma, Ariz., 30; 18. Michael Whissen, Yuma, Ariz., 29; 19. Mike Erwin, Yuma, Ariz., 28.  IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Rod Craddock, Alvin, Texas, 116; 2. Tyler Harris, Vidor, Texas, 115; 3. Kent Lewis Sr., Willis, Texas, 110; 4. Jacob Harris, Vidor, Texas, 109; 5. Caleb Padgett, Madisonville, Texas, 100; 6. Blake Cunningham, Silsbee, Texas, 89; 7. Mike Oliver, San Antonio, Texas, 85; 8. Theresa Waller, Montgomery, Texas, 83; 9. Daniel King, Conroe, Texas, 70; 10. Marcus Thomas, Corsicana, Texas, 66; 11. Beau Smith, Pearland, Texas, 65; 12. Tommy Hall, Natchitoches, La., 59; 13. Danny Burke, Crosby, Texas, 58; 14. Chris Hinson, Nederland, Texas, 53; 15. Kyle Rasmussen, Clovis, Calif., 40; 16. Mike Schott, Tulare, Calif., 39; 17. Brooklyn Holland, Fresno, Calif., 38; 18. Dustyn Welch, Bryan, Texas, 37; 19. Johnny Brown, Mauriceville, Texas, and Brendan Warmerdam, Lemoore, Calif., both 36.  Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods – 1. Gregory Muirhead, Mabank, Texas, and Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, both 372; 3. James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, 327; 4. Chris Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 243; 5. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, and Larry Underwood, Temple, Texas, both 240; 7. Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, 222; 8. James McCreery, Midlothian, Texas, 200; 9. David Bolf, Wichita Falls, Texas, 183; 10. Jared Baird, Norman, Okla., 155; 11. Kyle Robinson, Pilot Point, Texas, 151; 12. Jon White Jr., Red Oak, Texas, 142; 13. Cory Williams, Tahoka, Texas, and Todd West, Hudson Oaks, Texas, both 138; 15. Jay Coone, Weatherford, Texas, 137; 16. Kaden Honeycutt, Willow Park, Texas, and Cullen Hill, Healdton, Okla., both 131; 18. Don Reid, Oklahoma City, Okla., and Trevor Foley, Iowa Park, Texas, both 130; 20. Garett Rawls, Elm Mott, Texas, 128. Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Brian Schoenbaum, Killeen, Texas, 339; 2. Steven Bevills, Granbury, Texas, 319; 3. Harold Clifton, Stephenville, Texas, 249; 4. Howard Watson, Weatherford, Texas, 240; 5. William Creese, Springtown, Texas, and Anthony Vandenberg, Dublin, Texas, both 236; 7. Kaleb Watson, Mineral Wells, Texas, 220; 8. Clifton Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 184; 9. Scott Newbury, Rhome, Texas, 183; 10. Pamela Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 165; 11. Randy McNorton Jr., Alvord, Texas, 164; 12. Kody Crofutt, Dublin, Texas, 160; 13. Derek Cates, Woodway, Texas, 153; 14. Ryan Whisenant, Stephenville, Texas, 132; 15. Colton Mooney, Boyd, Texas, 120; 16. Billy Butcher, Boyd, Texas, 101; 17. Jack Lewis, Temple, Texas, 97; 18. Mike Smith, Mansfield, Texas, and Robert Cody, Farmington, N.M., both 69; 20. Johnny Clark, Cleburne, Texas, 68.last_img read more

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