Sometimes and Always

first_imgSometimes“Sometimes” isn’t a good strategy.“Sometimes” doesn’t produce anything consistently except inconsistency.“Sometimes” can’t be trusted or counted on.“Sometimes” is sporadic.“Sometimes” occasionally gets lucky, but its success is fleeting.Always“Always” is everything that “sometimes” is not.“Always” is the picture of consistency. It may roll slowly, but it rolls over everything in its path over time.“Always” can be trusted and counted on. You know that no matter what may happen “always” is going to be there.“Always” doesn’t need luck. “Always” can sustain its success over the long run because that’s what is built for.“Always” doesn’t do as much as “sometimes,” but what it does it does a lot better.“Sometimes” is the sexy, more interesting choice. “Always” is the choice of the true craftsman.You have to choose between “sometimes” and “always.”QuestionsWhat do you do “sometimes?”What do you do “always?”Which of your “sometimes” should really be “always?”last_img read more

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5 Unparalleled Stories You Need to Capture Mindshare

first_imgIn Eat Their Lunch: Winning Customers Away from Your Competition, there is a chapter on Capturing Mindshare, a process you could think of as how you might shape the lens through which your clients view their world, their business, and their decisions. The framework provides a way to start a conversation about change, changing what they are doing, and changing their partner, as the book is about competitive displacements (i.e., eating their lunch). Here are five stories that shape the lens through which your client views their world.The Story of Where We Are NowOne of the greatest frustrations you might suffer from in sales is a client who can’t or won’t see what you see. You recognize the factors that should be causing your dream client to see and do things differently, but they don’t yet understand what is very clear to you. One of the ways to help your clients see things differently is by providing them with a story of where we are now. To tell this story, you are going to need trends, proof, implications, and a recommendation based on your views and values.“Every day in the United States, roughly 11,000 baby boomers retire. That is is 4,000,000 people retiring each year or 333,000 a month. The US Economy creates about 150,000 jobs per month now. Each month, as the largest generation of Americans retires, the gap between open positions and available workers grows larger, as the generations that followed the Baby Boomers are smaller.”This is a story about where we are now. It explains why something is occurring now. It also made up of facts that can be proven and verified. Stories like these help your dream client to see something that was hidden to them.The Story of Impending ImplicationsThe outcome of a story about where we are is to help your prospective client explore change, a concept you will find in The Lost Art of Closing: Winning the 10 Commitments That Drive Sales. The where we are story may not be adequate to the challenge of compelling change. What compels change are the consequences of the decisions your client makes—or doesn’t make.“What are the implications of Baby Boomers retiring in large numbers? There are too few people available to backfill their jobs. There is a growing skills gap, as the available employees lack the time and experience in specific roles. The generations behind the Baby Boomers aren’t interested in the positions available. All of these mean you are going to be challenged by finding the people you need to staff your business.”Avoiding the potential negative consequences and obtaining positive consequences is what drives decisions. People generally try to avoid pain and seek pleasure. If there are no negative consequences for maintaining the status quo, people don’t tend to change.The Story of Better Future ResultsYou need a theory about how what your dream client needs to do to create a better future. Your clients don’t want to buy your product for service; they want to buy the better outcomes they want or need. You need a story about better future results, a vision about where your dream client needs to go.“In the future, it is essential that you both acquire the talent you need to compete and grow your business, as well as building the capabilities of the people you hire when they lack the experience or training. With a strategy that balances a combination of buying and developing talent, you have a competitive advantage and are positioned to continue growing.”Embedded here is a theory about what is necessary to succeed in the not-to-distant future. The story is focused on strategic outcomes, what decision-makers are interested in buying, and it says nothing about a product or service or the salesperson’s company, these things not being necessary to the outcome of the story.The Story of How to Make ChangeIt’s almost certain you know how to tell these stories. These are the stories you tell about what your dream client needs to do to achieve a better future state your shared with them. Naturally, these stories speak to the outcomes produced by your product, service, or solution.“The two changes necessary to build a balanced program require changes to your employee value proposition to allow you to attract and retain passive candidates and a training and development program for job titles that will enable you to build talent that can grow into greater responsibility.”How do you know you are consultative? If the advice in the preceding paragraph is accurate, if it is the right answer even if they chose your competitor, you are consultative. You don’t find any reference to the company or product because the advice is the product (When you understand the implication of this sentence, you will be a better salesperson. You will also find your dream clients prefer you over your competitors).The Story of What’s NextThere is one more story you need to tell. You need to share with your client what comes next, what happens after the better future state. Retaining and growing your clients comes from the constant and continuous creation of new value.Now that you are acquiring the talent you need and building the rest, your focus needs to shift to retaining key employees and developing the next generation of leaders in every function.With this, you pivot back to the story of “where we are now,” and you begin the process again. Retention and growth come from the stories about what’s next, and it’s how you go from quarter to quarter, always helping your clients to produce an upward spiral of better results. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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India Among Countries With Lowest Salary Expectations in Business, STEM Fields

first_imgIndia is among the 10 countries where fresh graduates in the fields of Business and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) have the lowest salary expectations, a recent survey shows. Among the countries with lowest expectations, India comes at the ninth spot, followed by the Czech Republic.Indian business students expect their salary to be $14,236 a year on average, while the figure is $14,832 for STEM students. India follows China, which occupies the eighth position in this list, with business students expecting $13,709 and STEM students expecting $14,021. In Indonesia, the salary expectation in the business and STEM fields is $8,140 and $8,970, respectively.Feedback from 533,351 business and STEM students from 29 countries was taken for the 2017 Talent Survey conducted by the human-resources consulting firm, Universum Global. “In order to assess the cost of talent in each country we asked business and STEM students what they expect to earn in their first job after graduating university,” it said in a statement.The country with the highest salary expectation is Switzerland, where a business student can expect $74,400 in total annual compensation while STEM students can expect $75,300. In Denmark, business and STEM degree holders can expect to earn $61,500 and $65,000, respectively.Students of business in the United States expect to make a little over $56,000 per year, while STEM graduates expect $59,500. The average expected salary in Australia in the fields of business and STEM is around $45,000 and $48,000, respectively.“For business students with the highest salary expectations, the top three most chosen industries were, aerospace & defense, real estate and financial services,” said the survey. STEM students with the highest salary expectations had very similar industry preferences and chose financial services, aerospace and defense and management and strategy consulting.India has the largest gap when the highest and lowest expectations in salary STEM are compared. People harboring the lowest salary expectations chose healthcare services, while those with the highest salary expectations thought they would earn 1.7 times more by joining the financial services industry.Saying that India had the most dramatic gap is salary expectation in the field of STEM, the survey said that remuneration is a driving factor while choosing a career for most. It also revealed that the countries with the lowest gap in salary expectation within the STEM field of study are Norway and Sweden.“In Norway, those who have the lowest salary expectations chose Arts, Entertainment and Recreation as a preferred industry, whereas those with the highest salary expectations chose Construction and Civil Engineering, yet they only expect to earn 1.2 times more,” said the survey.In Sweden, with students with the lowest salary expectations chose tourism, hospitality and leisure activities and those with the highest salary expectations chose Financial Services. However, those choosing financial services made only 1.1 times more.The survey also showed that business talent from Russia, India and Spain displayed the biggest disparity in terms of expected income, whereas Malaysia, Sweden and Canada have the smallest gap in salary expectations.Among all the 29 countries that took part in the survey, male talent in both fields of study were shown to expect to earn more than their female peers. Countries with the biggest contrast in expected earnings amongst male and female STEM talent are the Netherlands, Canada and Indonesia.In India, men in the field of STEM demand close to $18,000, while women ask for about $15,000. In the field of business, men demand around $15,000 as compared to about $12,000 for women.There is no clarity as to why male talent continued to demand and negotiate higher salaries. “If female talent does not demand higher wages during negotiations, the gap will not be narrowed unless employers are proactive and voluntarily provide higher wages to women without being asked for them,” said the survey.In Switzerland, men in the field of business ask for about $75,000 while women demand a little above $70,000. The gender gap is almost equal in the field of business in Malaysia and Sweden, with both men and women demanding close to $8,000 and $45,000, respectively.Countries with Lowest Salary Expectations1. KazakhstanBusiness Graduates: $7,628STEM Graduates: $8,3672. IndonesiaBusiness Graduates: $8,140STEM Graduates: $8,9703. MalaysiaBusiness Graduates: $8,765STEM Graduates: $9,2844. Russia:Business Graduates: $11,096STEM Graduates: $10,9195. TurkeyBusiness Graduates: $11,417STEM Graduates: $12,1816. PolandBusiness Graduates: $11,853STEM Graduates: $12,5137. MexicoBusiness Graduates: $12,494STEM Graduates: $13,3528. ChinaBusiness Graduates: $13,709STEM Graduates: $14,0219. IndiaBusiness Graduates: $14,236STEM Graduates: $14,83210. Czech RepublicBusiness Graduates: $14,901STEM Graduates: $15,527 Related ItemsEmploymenthuman resourceslast_img read more

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The Hidden India In America

first_imgWalking in the bustling cities of America, you’d be surprised to learn that India is just a block or two away. Who would have thought, but in America there are thousands of Shivas, Parvatis, Ganeshas, Buddhas and a whole horde of celestial dancers – enough for a major Convention of the Gods! We are not speaking of Hindu temples or home shrines, but of a huge, totally hidden world of Indian antiquities, paintings and artifacts that people on the street might not even realize exists.  New immigrants may feel the culture clash, the loss of India as they merge into the frenetic mainstream of American cities and towns that often seem devoid of any markers of Indian life. Little do they realize that India’s art and culture – some of the most wonderful masterpieces – are preserved and documented in some of the finest museums across America. Yes, you could almost go on a pilgrimage, an art expedition across America to learn more about India. Perhaps the place to start our art yatra is at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston (MFA) which is regarded as the birthplace of Indian art scholarship and collecting in America, and has a strong Indian collection, particularly rich in the areas of Mughal paintings, Indian drawings, paintings from the Punjab Hills as well as early Buddhist art and medieval stone sculptures. The MFA has over 5000 objects of South Asian origin and the first Indian objects came into the museum around 1900. Denman Waldo Ross, an important collector, donated several pieces to the museum, including the Yakshi figure from Sanchi, which may be the only one outside of India. He also purchased the private collection of Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy, a leading intellectual, and donated it to the museum. He was instrumental in appointing Coomaraswamy, who was of British and Sri-Lankan descent, as the first museum’s first curator for Indian art.Although British archaeologists and aesthetes had begun to piece together the basic chronology of Indian art, Coomaraswamy was responsible for placing art objects in a social, religious, and political context, and for explaining the art so a Western audience could appreciate it. He wrote a defining book on Indian painting and was regarded as the father of Indian art history in this country.  Woodman Taylor, assistant curator for South Asian and Islamic Art, says Coomaraswamy went on several trips to India and acquired several important pieces and built the museum’s collection, which has the only fragments from Ajanta outside of the site. Indians in the Boston area are aware of the important collection the museum holds and Taylor says, “We do see a lot of Indian Americans coming into the museum and we hope to do a lot more with a major exhibition in the fall, Domains of Wonder, which has been organized by the leading historian Dr. B. N. Goswamy” Visiting India through different time zones is possible in the rich, eclectic collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The Met’s connection with India goes back to 1891 when a Pala sculpture was donated to it. You can see the vibrancy of several centuries placed together in the wonderful South Asian Galleries at the Met donated by Herbert and Florence Irving who have been dedicated collectors of South Asian art.“Perhaps the most comprehensive collection anywhere outside India is at the Met,” says Steven Kossak, Curator of the South Asian Galleries at the Met. “We have a large collection and really there are important objects throughout the collection.” Asked about the high points of the collection, Kossak mentions four: a seated Gandharan Buddha which may be the first known Gandharan metal image of Buddha, and a bronze sculpture of the goddess Parvati, which is one of the finest Chola period sculptures outside of India.There is also a powerful Gupta period terra cotta of Krishna killing Keshi, the horse demon. Says Kossak, “It’s extraordinary for its vibrancy. It displays many of the characteristics one thinks of with Gupta sculpture in terms of the way in which volume takes precedence over any kind of linear development or anecdote. It’s a very strong, very vibrant sculpture.” Another masterpiece is Yashoda and Krishna from South India, perhaps Karnataka, 14th century, and it shows Yashoda nursing the infant Krishna. Says Kossak. “There are few pieces like this. There’s wonderful tenderness in the sculpture, the sense of the intimacy of the scene yet Yashoda is looking square at the viewer – the sense of the darshan being passed is quite extraordinary.”Since the collection at the Met is so large it is arranged chronologically and geographically, starting with the Indus Valley civilization. “We also have a first class collection of South east Asian and Sri Lankan art,” says Kossak. “All these cultures were informed by Indic culture. This may be the only place anywhere where you can look not only at Indian art, but at the influence of Indian art.”India is by no means confined to the South Asian galleries, because it spills over to the Islamic Galleries where you can see fine examples of Mughal and Deccani material – in fact, a remarkable Akbar period manuscript is on view currently in “Pearls of the Parrot” exhibit. Says Kossak, “When the Islamic Galleries, which are being renovated, are opened six years later, they may make a separate gallery for later India so that all the paintings can be seen together. To understand Indian painting one has to see it as a whole.” Are Indians coming in more to view their heritage? Says Kossak, “In the ten years the galleries have been open I’ve seen a marked increase in the number of people visiting the gallery, both Indian and non-Indian, and I think just by the fact that this material is there and people know it’s there – there has been a manifold increase in the numbers. The museum’s outreach program in terms of education has also helped us and all this seems to be adding up to greater visitorship.” And is the Met seeing more Indians as donors or sponsors? “So far we have not seen that,” says Kossak. “As far as I know, there are not a lot of Indians who have collected classical art of India or even Indian painting. There are a couple, but not many. I think the big push has been to collecting contemporary Indian art. Unfortunately there’s been very little involvement of the Indian community, certainly at the level of donor or even as Friends of Asian art. We don’t have any Indians on that.” The next stop for viewing masterpieces of Indian art is the Asia Society, which houses the famous John D. Rockefeller collection. In February the museum is gearing up for the 50th anniversary of this collection with a blockbuster show: A Passion for Asia: The Rockefeller Family Collects. It features 150 of the most stunning and important Asian artworks originally purchased and owned by family members.Adriana Proser, traditional arts curator, points out some of the best pieces including a sculpture of Sakyamuni which shows the influence of the early Gupta style: ” It’s a piece that has a very powerful presence. One of the marking is that he has webbed hands, very beautifully delineated in this sculpture.” Then there’s wonderful sandstone Ganesha, 8th century from Uttar Pradesh, which greets visitors as they come into the museum. This endearing figure has a crown, a lotus pedestal and ten arms. The collection has major Chola bronzes of great importance. The most spectacular is Krishna dancing on Kaliya, an incredible feat of bronze casting with a lot of life and movement to the sculpture.Asia Society does see many Indian visitors whenever there are India-related shows. “Last year we had a heavy India focus and because of that we did get many Indian visitors,” says Proser. “There is a lot of interest by the local Indian community in the arts of India; and we also have members who are involved as board members or high-level members. When we have India focused shows the Indian community really comes forward and helps makes those shows possible. As you know, even one show in one gallery, if it’s an international show, can cost more than a million dollars. An exhibition coming up in fall of 2007 is focused on the arts of Kashmir and quite a few Indians are involved to fund that research.”  Other important museums include the Cleveland Museum, which has a sizeable and important sculpture collection, although it is currently closed for renovation.Brooklyn Museum in New York has a collection that now numbers 8,000 objects, a range of art from early terra cottas and ceramics dating back to the Neolithic and Indus Valley Civilization, all the way to contemporary art. Highlights include the Hamzanama painting, commissioned by the emperor Akbar, Indian terra cotta, and sculptures in stone and bronze.“We have an outstanding collection of Indian sculptures in stone and bronze, Indian miniature paintings and textiles,” says Amy G. Poster, Curator and Chair of the Department of Asian Art. “Right now we’re concentrating on the decorative arts of India from the 17th to the 20th century, including jewelry. What makes Brooklyn unique is that we see India not only as an independent range of cultures within the sub-continent, but also its interaction with the Islamic world, China, and south-east Asia, because many of the subjects that were formed and created in Indian art made their way to other cultures and had a tremendous affect on those cultures.” Only a fraction is on view, but it’s a chronological display from the pre-Kushan all the way to the 19th century.The museum has several Indian supporters and contributors, and some are also members of the museum’s Asian Art Council: “We try to keep an active program and we’ve had a history of very close collaborations with our colleagues in India. We’d love to do much more than we are,” says Poster.You can actually see a pillared temple hall from the 16th century at the Philadelphia Museum, which too has an extensive collection of South Asian art. The temple hall is the only Indian stone architecture standing in the U.S. While particularly strong in sculpture from the great temples of India, the diverse holdings offer a comprehensive view of South Asian art, including paintings and sculptures from India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Nepal and Tibet; an important group of textiles; and a variety of decorative and “folk” arts.  Many of the works are from the collection of the eminent scholar Dr. Stella Kramrisch, who served as curator and curator emeritus for Indian art at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from 1954 until her death in 1993. Major exhibitions presented by the Department of Indian Art over recent decades include “Manifestations of Shiva” (1981), and “Painted Delight: Indian Paintings from Philadelphia Collections” (1986). In 1997, the Museum’s Department of Prints, Drawings and Photographs and the Aperture Foundation organized “India: A Celebration of Independence” (1997), an exhibition of some 250 photographs. Its current exhibit until May 2006 is titled “Adventures in a Perfect World: North Indian Narrative Paintings, 1750 -1850.”The Los Angeles County Museum (LACMA) also has a substantial Indian collection. This gallery displays a diverse range of South Asian paintings on a rotating basis, including 11th-century Pala dynasty manuscripts, 16th-19th-century Mughal dynasty paintings, and modern South Asian graphic arts. LACMA’s collection of South Asian sculpture is one of the most encyclopedic outside of South Asia. The earliest material on exhibit is from the Harappan civilization of the Indus River Valley, which flourished some 5,000 years ago. The display of Buddhist, Hindu, and Jain sculptures in a variety of media documents the entire spectrum of stylistic and iconographic development of the art of these religions throughout South AsiaSan Francisco is the home of the Asian Art Museum, which has one of the most comprehensive collections of Asian Art in the world, including India. Its temple sculptures, reliefs, bronze images, jades, miniature paintings, and wood carvings, reflecting the major trends in all major religions of India over a 2,000 year period – Hindu, Muslim, Buddhist, Sikh, Jain. It is the only museum in the Western hemisphere with a gallery devoted to Sikh art. Dr. Narinder Singh Kapany of California is one of the prime donors and indeed the Janam Sakhi manuscripts, which form the nucleus of his collection, belonged to his ancestors two centuries ago. His large collection includes paintings, arms and armour, and he has donated 100 objects to the permanent gallery of Sikh art, which is housed in the new $150 million facilities of The Asian Art Museum.If you’re trying to see the best of Indian art in a beautiful environment, Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena is a must. Norton Simon, who was married to the actress Jennifer Jones, traveled to India on his honeymoon in 1971 was deeply moved by his experiences and developed a life long love for the arts of India.Christine Knoke, assistant curator of Asian art at the Norton Simon, says the museum has received generous donations of artwork from various Indian Americans, living on both the east and west coasts. Two generations of the Kapoor family in New York have been donors since 1997, including Subhash Kapoor, Ramesh and Urmil Kapoor, Suneet and Alka Kapoor and Vineet and Floretta Kapoor. Several important California collectors have also made significant contributions, including Narendra and Rita Parson, Pratapaditya and Chitra Pal and the late Ranjit Roy. Knoke says, “As we do not actively acquire works of art, it is only through donations that we are able to expand the collection built by Norton Simon and fill in the curatorial gaps.” Knoke says, “Our current special exhibition, ‘Durga: Avenging Goddess, Nurturing Mother’ and the related programming including lectures, film screenings and a dance performance, has proven to be very popular with our local Bengali community. I am thrilled that the Bengali Association of Southern California agreed to lend us their Durga puja tableau, which was built in India in the late 1980s. It is one of the most popular artworks in the exhibition.”The San Diego Museum of Art (SDMA) is also an important stop for any lover of Indian art for it houses the Edwin Binney Collection, which is renowned worldwide as one of the largest and most important concentrations of Indian painting outside of India. The late Edwin Binney was heir to the Crayola fortune, and he left his collection of over 1,453 works to the museum. The works in the collection range in date from the 6th through 20th centuries, with the strength of the collection in paintings from India from the 15th through 19th centuries. The collection provides a complete overview of Indian court painting with examples representing the best of each school.SDMA has launched a nationally touring exhibition featuring 125 of the finest examples from its extensive collection of paintings from India. Titled “Domains of Wonder: Selected Masterworks of Indian Painting,” the exhibition opened at SDMA in fall 2005 and will travel to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, in fall 2006 and the Dallas Museum of Art in fall 2007. Sonya Quintanilla,curator of Asian art, says the collection is a great source of civic pride: ” It is regarded as something unique, not just another fine collection of Indian art, but a world-class collection, which in terms of its encyclopedic scope, is unlike any other single collection inside or outside of India. Members of the local community have become so intrigued with the Binney Collection, that they have formed a support organization, the Committee for the Arts of the Indian Subcontinent (CAIS), which works to support the collection by raising funds for publication and exhibition of the paintings, and by sponsoring lectures, performances and other special events on related topics.”The Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, MA has been a pioneer in the study and presentation of Indian art in the United States. Shortly after its founding in 1799, the museum began collecting contemporary art and culture from India. Today, its holdings include thousands of works from India, from the 18th through the 20th centuries, including paintings and drawings; works in clay, wood, and metal; embroideries; furniture; and a large collection of 19th- century photographs. The collection also contains important logs, journals, and letters recounting 18th- and 19th-century voyages to India.It is one of the few museums to showcase contemporary Indian art and houses the Chester and Davida Herwitz Collection of Contemporary Indian Art, which comprises more than 1,200 works by many of India’s leading artists of the second half of the twentieth century. A current exhibition, “Exposing the Source: The Paintings of Nalini Malani,” presents two decades of the artist’s works. Susan Bean, the curator, points out that the collection has some seminal works by Tyeb Mehta and MF Husain, the current stars of the international contemporary art market.“The Boston area has a large resident population of Indian origin and we’ve seen a very significant increase in their attendance at the museum since we opened the new Indian galleries,” says Bean. “We now have three members of the museum’s board of overseers who are of Indian origin. In addition we are anticipating expanding the Indian galleries with the help of major support from within the Indian community. Next fall we’ll be mounting an exhibition built around works from the important series of Mahabharata paintings created by M F Husain for the 1972 Sao Paulo Biennale.”In the Washington DC area, Charles Lang Freer created the first art museum of the Smithsonian in 1923, and remarkably it was dedicated to Asian art at a time when Asians were nowhere on the scene. The Sackler Freer Gallery of the Smithsonian has a rich collection of South Asian art with over 1,200 objects from first century BC to the present. The highlights include a Gandharan frieze illustrating the life of Buddha, the Freer Ramayana, an illustrated manuscript of the Hindu epic painted for a Mughal nobleman, as well as a small but superb collection of Chola bronzes, paintings from the Mughal and Rajput courts, Buddhist art from Nepal and Tibet as well as company school works by Indian artists for British patrons. The bustling, gritty town of Newark has a large Indian American population, as does the entire state of New Jersey and Indian families will be happy to know that the Newark Museum has its strong Indian connections. Valrae Reynolds, curator of Asian Collections, says, “The Newark Museum has been seriously collecting Indian art since it received a major gift in 1941. The holdings are particularly strong in textiles and folk art, but many fine examples of Buddhist and Hindu sculpture have entered the collection in the last 40 years, including Birth of Buddha, The Elephant-Headed God Ganesha, and Durga Mahishamardini.”Meme Omogbai, chief operating officer of the museum, observes: “New Jersey has the fastest growing Indian population in America and The Newark Museum with its extensive collection of Indian artifacts is actively engaged in outreach to the community with a new addition to the board of trustees, Poonam Khubani. The attendance at museum events has doubled each of the last few years.” Reynolds adds, “We’ve begun an initiative to attract Indian visitors. Our last Asian Heritage Festival in May 2005 attracted a few hundred Indian family members, and we plan to make Indian culture the focus of our May 8, 2006 Festival. A contemporary Indian photography show is planned for 2007.”Yes, the tentacles of Indian art spread far and wide – even till Honolulu, Hawaii! In fact the Honolulu Academy of Arts is one of the few museums where a gallery has been named after its Indian donor, Jhamandas Watumull. His son Gulab and daughter-in-law Indru, who are passionate art collectors, did this as a surprise birthday gift for him when he turned 100 years old. Indru herself is on the board of the academy and the Jhamandas Watumull endowment assists with purchases and programs. The academy’s collection of arts from India is one of the fastest growing departments in the Asian collection, and includes religious sculpture and decorative art. In addition to these large collections countless smaller Indian art collections are spread across the United States. Says Met’s Kossak: “Basically the greatest Indian art is in India and will always remain in India. So whatever we have gives you a taste for what is there, but really the greatest examples still remain insitu on monuments and rock-cut sculptures or in museums in India. So this is only a primer for somebody who wants to know about Indian art. It doesn’t represent the absolute highest points that those traditions reach. What we have is first class but, on the other hand, the best of what exists in India is beyond first class.” Related Itemslast_img read more

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Bollywood Gamble

first_imgDoctors do it, IT professionals do it, and even convenience store owners do it. No, we’re not talking about love, sex or marriage, but something almost as essential to life for Indians – cinema! Param Gill of California is a practicing dentist, but he’s also the producer of Rockin’ Meera, a new Indie film for which he raised $1.5 million from his dentist friends and family.Dr. Kiran Patel of Florida and Dr. Ranga Reddy of Chicago along with other physicians have funded the development of a film project by Hollywood director Babu Subramaniam on the true Gandhian saga of an Indian doctor in America.Kiran Merchant, an architect in New Jersey, raised half a million dollars for his first film Quarterlife Crisis, starring Lisa Ray, Maulik Pancholy and Russell Peters, from several investors who are professionals like him.Vivek Wadhwa of North Carolina, former CEO of Relativity Technologies, used his IT connections to raise money for My Bollywood Bride. Currently an adjunct professor at Duke University, he is tapping investors for a second, more ambitious film. Ashok Amritraj, the former tennis star who’s had a successful run as a Hollywood producer with his Hyde Park Productions relies on studio financing and bank loansPoonam Khubani, a businesswoman based in New Jersey, plugged over a million dollars of her own money into Aryan, her first full-fledged Bollywood venture, starring Sohail Khan and Sneha Ullal and flew in a celebrity fight-instructor from Australia for boxing scenes.Hand just about any desi a megaphone – and some moolah – and they think they can make a movie.Of course, cinema is India’s national malady and just about anyone from the subcontinent suffers from it. For them life isn’t life until it’s splashed on the big screen with seven superstars, six songs, two item numbers and a title like Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham. Not only do they cry and laugh, but feel they’ve had a reel dose of real life with all its spice.While Indians love watching movies, most secretly wish they could act, sing or even direct. The Bollywood factor seems written into our desi genes. So it comes as no surprise that Indian American professionals in America are finding another way to connect with their lust for cinema by investing in movies.Param Gill has worked on many a patient in his dentist’s chair, but is now himself sitting in the director’s chair and doing what most dental professionals only fantasize about – making his first feature film.He says, “I’m from India and as you know, there it’s one thing after another. After school, it’s dental school, and after dental school you’re a dentist and you never find time to do what you really want to do. And sometimes you have stories to tell and you want an outlet.”So, Gill took a course at the New York Film Academy, following which he made some short films, which fired him up to take on a feature film. Rockin’ Meera, an unconventional love story with an Indian heroine and an African American hero, shot partly in India, is scheduled for release in July. Harish Saluja: It took me five years before I was able to sell it piecemeal around the the world and eventually to independant film channels.Before trying to raise funds, Gill used his own money to first complete the soundtrack, featuring hot names like Sukwinder Singh and Shaan, which he then used as a calling card to attract investors: “This gave investors some faith that if they put their money into it, something would come out of it.”Who were the investors in his $1.5 million film? His story is not unlike that of scores of aspiring Indian American filmmakers who have made small budget films during the past two decades.“Well, basically the way it’s done is you put together a script and a business plan and essentially your friends and your family are your investors and you yourself are an investor,” he says.Most of the funds were raised through his dental contacts – and one can only hope he didn’t touch any clients for investments while drilling a root canal!“You need to know what kind of returns to expect from a project like that and there’s a best case scenario and a worst case scenario,” he adds. “Mostly the money comes from people who believe in you and the onus is on you not to lose the investment – and that is a very uphill task, because there are too many films being made and there are too few cinema halls out there.”The odds in the movie business are daunting and the vast majority of investors, perhaps as many as 80 to 90 percent, won’t see a penny. But that doesn’t seem to deter starry eyed Indian Americans. Every month you hear of a new movie venture in Silicon Valley or New York. Just about everyone from a physicist in California to a convenience store owner in New Jersey is putting money into movies. Kanwal Rekhi, the IT magnate, has an ambitious $7 million Imax film titled Taj Mahal in the works. Fresh-out-of-film school dreamers are busy raising money for their first feature film. Param Gill, a dentist, made his first feature film Rockin’ Meera on a $1.5 million budget raised from his dental contacts.Babu Subramaniam, who’s been in Hollywood for 25 years working on TV shows like ER and Strong Medicine, is currently directing a Holly Hunter project for Fox TNT. He has seen many Indian Americans investing in small independent films: “There are a lot of mom and pop operations, people that put in money – jewelry store owners and restaurant owners, because their children want to do something with movies, the ABCD kind of movies.”Do these small investors have a prayer in this dog eat dog celluloid world of recouping their money? We turned to Deepak Nayar, who hit the bulls-eye with Gurinder Chadha’s Bend it Like Beckham, a low cost film that made millions around the world.He raises money through various independent financiers, a model that has not changed since Bend it Like Beckham. When doctors or IT professionals approach him with cinematic propositions, he says, “I ask them are you prepared to lose all the money? And if they say no, I tell them ‘You’re the wrong investor.’ Indeed, making movies is a very risky business. Let’s face it – you cannot be an investor in it as a one time investor.”He says that someone in the business of making films eventually will have a major success that will cover their previous losses. Every studio has its ups and downs – that’s the nature of the movie making business and risk is a given.“I tend to have traditionally stayed away from independent one-time investors looking to invest – whether it’s the dentist, or the doctor or the IT guy,” he says. “I have always told them you have to look at it as a business and you have to treat it like a business. Traditionally these people who are attracted by the glamour of the movie business are not savvy enough, so most of my films are funded by companies that are in the business of funding films. If someone has $10 million, they invest 10 percent each in 10 different films so if one goes down they may recoup their money on another one – so you have to hedge your odds.” Nanda Anand: In my investing agreements it clearly states that the chances of you losing your entire investment is quite high. Understand that before you invest.Nayar says a hit like Bend it Like Beckham is a rarity. He went on to do two more films with Chadha, Bride and Prejudice, which did reasonably well and Mistress of Spices, which did not. “For me, it’s a profession, just like people work in a bank and take a nine to five job. This is what I do. I make films.”Advertising and marketing is key to a movie’s success. “To market a film in the US today on 3,000 prints is going to require a commitment of $30 million. Once you make these independent films there’s a lot of draw of the luck, which is you make them, you take them to film festivals and you hope they will become a success. Mostly they fall flat and there are very few and far between which take off.”And even that does not translate into profits, as Tirlok Malik, a restaurateur who made Lonely in America several years ago can attest. This critically acclaimed film is a cautionary tale of how things can go wrong with even a good product in the hands of novices. According to Malik, the film screened in 74 countries, 77 festivals, and ran on HBO. It made $30 million worldwide for his distributors, he says, but he did not see any of the money.“Since it was my first movie, I was not aware of the loopholes,” says Malik, who says the film was made on a $500,000 budget. “The distributors had the master copy of the film and could be selling it all over the world. The relationship between producer and distributor is part of the business of movie making and a producer is lucky if he has a good distributor.”Since then Malik has produced Arya, on a $60,000 shoe-string budget (excluding marketing) which did well in the DVD market and he has been involved in the line production of several films, including the big Rajnikant starrer Sivaji. He says, “Investing in a movie is generally considered risky, but if you keep the budget in control most likely you can make money out of this business. The problem happens when people go into it without knowledge or an appreciation of the larger picture. Sometimes a movie can make a lot of money and the investor still may not get anything back, because there are too many people along the way. That’s the reality of it.”The intimidating odds are only too well known to Harish Saluja of Pittsburgh, who made The Journey, starring Roshan Seth, in 1997, raising funds from investors who knew him through his publishing company, art gallery and radio program. He says, “Even if you can raise the money, distribution becomes a major issue. It took me five years before I was able to sell it piecemeal around the world and eventually to independent film channels.”Raising money from individuals was a trial: “The care and handling of private equity investors is so enormous and painful. They don’t know movies, they don’t know about investing and then some of them proceed to give you advice on how to make movies. It’s so painful!”Saluja, who is the founder of the Silk Screen Film Festival, is now working on two new films, Chasing Windmills and Guru Maharaja Inc., but is planning to line up distributors first who can help him get his movie out and even assist in getting it made. He says: “There’s a saying in the venture capitalist world – there are two kinds of money: the right money and the wrong money. The right kind of money not only gives you money, but also opens doors for you. The wrong kind of money, which we unfortunately end up using, is the type from friends and family who know nothing about films and do it out of love or because they are curious or greedy.” Kiran Merchant, a New Jersey architect, is all set to release his film Quarterlife Crisis.He finds it frustrating to educate them on a continual basis and just doesn’t have the stamina to do it all over again. He adds, “And of course I’m probably going to have to eat my words in the next few months if I can’t raise money through distributors!”Doctors came to the financial rescue when New Yorker Nanda Anand embarked on her first film, Return to Rajapur. The seed money was contributed by her husband, Dr. Vijay Anand, and a major investor was his colleague, Dr. Wellington Tichenor, along with several American businessmen.“When you are a first time filmmaker you have nothing to show investors, it’s really quite hard,” she says. “For investors putting their money into a small independent film, the chances of return are very poor. In my investing agreements it clearly states that the chances of you losing your entire investment is quite high. Understand that before you invest.” Gurinder Chadha’s Bend it Like Beckham, a low cost film made millions around the world. So what draws investors to these risky ventures? She says, “The experience of being able to invest in a film, being able to go to the festivals, being able to meet the talent and being part of the whole filmmaking experience has more to do with it then looking for returns. Although there’s always the hope you’ll break even, but I don’t think that was necessarily the reason behind people investing.”Investors put in 60 percent of the money into this evocative film, which on a $1.5 million budget created a lush cinematic experience set in Jaisalmer. The budget included the cost of buying a luxury home and investors were happy that the film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and other prestigious festivals. They are now hoping for theatrical release and have sold DVD rights.“Whether we’ll really get any money back is really, really dismal. By the time the distributors take their cut, and the rep company takes its cut, we’ll obviously see nothing. Sometimes returns take 10 to 15 years, especially in films of this caliber. However, some of the American actors in the film have gone on to becoming well-known, so the chances are it may go in either direction.”But the impressive debut movie has opened doors for Anand and this time around investors are offering to produce her movie. She finds that generally Indians look for returns even on small investments, which she cannot guarantee so she prefers to turn to mainstream investors.Kiran Merchant, a New Jersey architect, is all set to release his film Quarterlife Crisis, but recalls that some investors actually came looking for him with money to invest, knowing of his past projects in theater: “These venture capitalists were looking to diversify their investment. This is a high reward, high risk kind of a business, but for most of the people who are involved in low budget films, there’s not a phenomenonally high risk since the investment is small. At the end of the day even if the film does not make money the feeling is they did something worthwhile, rather than put it in another IT venture that may or may not click.”Lonely In America screened in 74 countries, 77 festivals, and ran on HBO. It made $30 million worlwide for distributors, producer Tirlok Malik says, but he did not see any of the money.Merchant says raising money is just one part of a very taxing business: “I find that every aspect of film making is tremendously difficult and I’m looking at the art and passion as one part. At the end of the day it all comes down to business, and at every stage of the project you are basically dealing with business.“It’s 90 percent business and 10 percent art. This becomes very important and I’ve realized that in order to be a successful artist I have to be a successful businessman.”Distribution is the bane of every emerging filmmaker. He says, “You could make one of the best films ever, but if no one sees it, your business model fails. And the reason Hollywood studios have been so successful is not because they are making good movies, but it’s because they’ve cracked the code of the business model. They have an understanding of how much money to put in not only in the making of the film, but also in the marketing. For example, a big studio will make a film for $150 million and then they will spend $150 million marketing it. The ultimate culmination of this whole business process is that they are able to sell the movie and attract the audience.”His next project is budgeted at $5 million and he plans to use corporate or production company financing as well as individual investors. He says, “Indians are investing, but not that many. If you ask them for a $50,000 or $100,000 investment, they will do it, but if you ask them for half a million, they will probably shy away.” Babu Subramaniam: There are a lot of mom and pop operations, people that put in money- jewelry store owners and restaurant owners, because their children want to do something with movies, the ABCD kind of movies.Given the relative scale of investments, NRI investors are increasingly flocking to Bollywood, where costs are a fraction of those in Hollywood. However, Vivek Wadhwa’s experience making My Bollywood Bride has not been pretty: “I had been very bullish on this industry and need to warn potential investors about the downside. The experience was very negative and stressful, but the outcome may be okay.”The investors he pooled together were ex-IT executives and some affluent physicians. The problem, according to Wadhwa, was that some of the investors didn’t look at the project as a professional investment and were too easily seduced by the glamour: “What should have been a $500-800K project ended up costing over $2 million. There was virtually no accounting provided by the producer. The film has come out very good, and most audiences seem to love it, so there is some hope, but it wasn’t fun dealing with all the financial issues.”Wadhwa wrote a column in Business Week about his bitter experiences in both film capitals. “What is needed is professional and ethical management and this industry could provide very good investment opportunities,” he says. “The film is likely to release in the next 3-4 weeks. I hope it does well and we get our money back. It has good potential, but would have been a sure bet if we had not gone so much over budget.” Another equally disillusioned investor in Bollywood is Poonam Khubani, whose company International Edge Inc., an infomercial distributor, produced Aryan, a Bollywood film with known stars. She originally put $500,000 into the venture, but the budget kept climbing. “We went almost double – and that’s largely one of these unseen things that happen in India. You start off with X budget and by the time you are done, it becomes just way too much to handle, and generally a producer thinks well, I’ve already sunk so much money, I might as well go into it all the way. The attitude should be, ‘Let me get out and cut my losses while I’m ahead in the game,’ instead of putting good money after bad.”What were the difficulties she encountered in making the movie in India? She says: “Even though we are Indians, we’ve lived a long time in the US and we have clarity in finance in this country. But India does not have that, especially in the Bollywood industry. You can figure that from the hiring of a camera crew or stunt people or crowd scenes, everyone gets paid off at every level – even your production assistant gets paid off! There are all types of bribes that happen there. It’s appalling, but that’s the way that world functions.”Would she do it again?“If the financial structure became a little bit clearer and I could be assured I would not be taken advantage of, then perhaps I would think about it again,” says Khubani. “As a producer one should have an upper hand, because you’re the one investing the money. But in India you have to toe the line of actors, director or anyone else who’s having a temper tantrum.“The producer is a person with a begging bowl who continuously begs people to give dates or give time, because he’s the only one interested in completing the movie, nobody else gives a damn. Bollywood is the world of wolves and one has to be really very cunning to deal with these people in the industry.”Mahesh Naithani, an IT professional passionate about art and music, can relate to Khubani’s frustration. He invested half-a-million dollars in Bombay Boys, starring Naveen Andrews and Rahul Bose. He put another $400,000 in Jai Ganga and $1 million in Such a Long Journey, starring Roshan Seth. He says he did not recoup his money in any of these ventures. “There was no accountability and there was not wide distribution,” he says. He recovered 90 percent of the money he put into Such a Long Journey but only 40 percent of his investment in the other two movies. None turned a profit. Poonam Khubani, who produced Aryan, originally put $500,000 into the venture, but the venture kept climbing. He says he sold the rights to Bombay Boys to a well-known distributor for India, but found the film was shown in England without his permission.He says investors engaged in another profession just don’t have the time or the knowledge to be effective: “The financial accountability in India is complicated. A lot of cash money goes to a lot of people, so if you want to have very transparent accounting you can’t do it. They tell you they spent 20 lakhs, but they could have spent 10 lakhs, you just don’t know. There is no accountability. There can be all sorts of receipts, but you don’t know if it’s reality or not.”“A lot of illegal things happen because the fact is that Mahesh Naithani is sitting in the US. What can he do?”He adds, “You want to make a movie for fun’s sake, yes, you can. But you can’t do this professionally without full involvement because you’re basically doing something else. The lesson from this is that you can’t do things with just your left hand; you have to do it with both hands. Anyone who makes that mistake will have problems. If you’re a doctor it takes you 30-40 years expertise to become a good doctor. So how can you become successful in films without understanding the field?”One producer who hasn’t had to turn to dentists and doctors is Ashok Amritraj, the former tennis star who’s had a successful run as a Hollywood producer with his Hyde Park Productions. He started in the 1980s with private investors and profited from the boom in the video market. He made movies on $5 to $7 million budgets and was able to sell them to the video market, cable channels like HBO and Showtime as well as international markets. Box office Guru’s Gitesh Pandya, producer of Hiding Divya. In 1990 after the box-office success of his film Double Impact, his reputation led him to joint ventures with major studios. Hyde Park Productions has made films like Bringing Down the House and most recently Premonition, using studio financing and bank loans.Amritraj has been in the business for 25 years and recently completed his 95th film. Collectively his films have grossed over $2 billion worldwide. He says, “To play the game I play in requires a lot of money. The track record and the credibility are very important. It really starts with the screenplay and then it’s a question of your relationship with talent, agents and directors and how you package the script. We’ve had Angelina Jolie, Sandra Bullock, Steve Martin, Kevin Bacon and Kelly Preston in our films so it’s generally star driven vehicles that we’re largely involved with. That takes tremendous amount of relationships and then it finally boils down to distribution.”Amritraj has that sewn up too with his own distribution company for international markets and 20th Century Fox in the U.S. He says, “There are a lot of pieces, but at Hyde Park all the pieces are in place. So it’s a little bit different than someone coming up the street with a script trying to put it together. I think all those pieces have to come together and after that, how the movie does is quite frankly really in the hands of the Gods. You do your best and everybody wants to make good movies.”Which brings us back to the emerging film makers who are totally on their own, such as Param Gill and his soon to be released movie Rockin’ Meera. Is there hope without a big distribution machine and a giant studio behind you?Gill was at the American Film Market and realized that nobody was going to hold a novice film-maker’s hand through the distribution process, so he hired marketing professionals. “We now have a group of investors who have decided to release films and get into the distribution part of it,” he says. “We are hiring an agency which specializes in the distribution and publicity of films. We are testing the waters. We need to have a few big successes that produce solid returns. This will require professional management as we see in other industries like technology.”For novice investors and producers, Deepak Nayar offers this cautionary advice: “If you’re a one time investor you might as well as go to Vegas and gamble all your money – it’s as good as that really. Put your money on black or red on the roulette wheel and see which one comes up. Your guess is as good as mine!”WHAT DO MOVIES REALLY MAKE?Money is on every movie producer’s mind but no one likes to talk about budgets or what they actually made – or lost. Some figures can be gleaned from the box office reports of Hollywood movies released in the US. Gitesh Pandya is producer of American Desi and the upcoming film Hiding Divya. Asfounder of Boxoffice Guru he offers the North American box office grosses of some Indian American films made over the past few years. American Desi $902,835  in 2001 American Chai $127,518  in 2002 Flavors $93,370  in 2004“Determining the profitability of a film is much more complicated than just looking at the budget and the North American gross,” he says. “Only a certain portion, roughly half, of the gross goes back to the distributor who in turn can have many kinds of deals in place with the producer.But then there is additional revenue that is earned from overseas theatrical markets, worldwide home video, and the sale of television rights.All kinds of deals are made including those involving flat upfront fees, revenue-sharing, or some combination. Therefore every film is on a unique road to profitability based on the deals struck by the producers.”Producers see less than half the gross, depending on the scale of the project, so it’s a fair bet that most Indian American productions have fallen flat. But the rare movie that breaks out can pull in some serious returns.Bend it Like Beckham, made on a $5 million budget, not counting marketing, recorded U.S. box office gross of $32 million and foreign gross of $40 million for a global gross of $72 million. The producers likely ended up seeing $30 million of the box office receipts in addition to DVD sales and video rights.On the other hand, another Gurinder Chadha movie, Bride and Prejudice, drew only a fifth of Bend it Like Beckham’s domestic gross with $6.6 million, while Mistress of Spice bombed.Ultimately, profitability is related to production costs. Vijay Amritraj’s latest movie Premonition, starring Sandra Bullock, pulled in a respectable $47 million in its first five weeks alone, substantially higher than Bend it Like Beckham’s entire domestic run, but since it is a far more expensive movie involving major studios with a combined production and marketing budget of over $60 million, it’ll be some time yet before Amritraj can breathe easy.Premonitions of Movie EconomicsMaking a movie is just the first part. Marketing is a major undertaking, often costing as much as the movie or more. According to Ashok Amritraj. “We made Premonition for $20 million and spent over $40 million in marketing it. It’s currently made over $60 million at the box office and is projected to do about $100 million worldwide just in the theaters and then there’s video and TV rights.”While Amritraj’s Hyde Park Pictures put up all the financing for the film, Sony put up the marketing dollars. Says Amritraj: “If you do the numbers and a film does $50 million at the US box office and another $50 million at the foreign box office, and then there’s video and DVD for the life of the film – that makes it a profitable film.” BEND IT LIKE DEEPAKProducer Deepak Nayar with Mahesh Mathai, Director of Bhopal Express and Broken ThreadDeepak Nayar, who produced the golden hit Bend it Like Beckham, fields many calls from would-be investors and movie-makers all hoping to make a killing. He says: “The trouble is none of them have guts enough to put down $50 or $100 million and play the big game. You cannot enter into the movie making business trepidatiously. You have to be bold.“Just hoping to make a movie and showing it at festivals and hoping it will be discovered is a very long shot. It’s like catching fish in a pond – hoping to get something out of nothing. Distribution and production are two separate entities. If you want to be in both you must have $100 million – then you can do what you want to do.“If someone comes with $500,000 I would turn them away, because I know it will be a loss. It’s too much of a moral obligation to take someone’s money, because no one really wants to lose money and so I want to make sure when I take someone’s money that it has a chance. Otherwise it’s pointless.”  Related Itemslast_img read more

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WWE Raw Results, Recap: Brock Lesnar Goes on Rampage, Bray Wyatt Sends a Message

first_imgThis week’s new and revamped Raw saw Rey Mysterio kicking off the show ahead of his scheduled universal title match against Seth Rollins. The evening saw Mysterio thank his son Dominick, who was seated ringside, for helping motivate him to earn this opportunity.However, he was quickly interrupted by Brock Lesnar and Paul Heyman. As Mysterio ripped the microphone away from Heyman, Lesnar went on a rampage. He delivered multiple F5s and suplexes to Rey before turning his attention to Dominick. Mysterio’s son was also rammed into the ring post and ate multiple suplexes himself. Heyman later apologised but said the McMahons were to blame for bringing Lesnar to Raw knowing he was in fight mode. The universal champion Seth Rollins said he does not know how to plan for someone like The Fiend Bray Wyatt bit plans to survive and prevail. The evening also saw Ric Flair and Hulk Hogan appear on the Miz TV and it was announced that WWE will be heading back to Saudi Arabia on Thursday, October 31 for another Crown Jewel event. Team Hogan will take Team Flair in a 5-on-5 match on the show, with Seth Rollins being revealed as Hogan’s captain while Randy Orton will serve as Flair’s captain.The match was to be followed by a bout between Rollins and Orton but Baron Corbin interrupted and the heels beat down the universal champion. Rusev was out to make the save, and the babyfaces stood tall and posed with Hogan at the top of the stage. Here’s what else happened on RawUniversal Championship – Seth Rollins (c) vs. Rusev ended in a no contest when Bobby Lashley’s music interrupted as he was making his return from injury. Lashley brought out an also returning Lana, and the two began to passionately make out on stage as a dejected Rusev looked on. The Field made his presence felt and laid down Rollins.What else happened on Raw?- Sasha Banks defeated Alexa Bliss via pinfall – Raw Tag Team Championship — Robert Roode and Dolph Ziggler (c) defeated Heavy Machinery via pinfall – The Viking Raiders def. Luke Gallows and Karl Anderson via pinfall – Ricochet defeated Cesaro via pinfall – United States Championship — AJ Styles (c) defeated Cedric Alexander via pinfall – Lacey Evans def. Natalya via pinfall The evening also saw another episode of “Firefly Funhouse” where Wyatt said he has a good feeling that “he” will be back but Rollins won’t be so fortunate. Wyatt fired off a “Let me in!” before signing off with laughter to end the segment. Bray WyattBrock LesnarHulk Hoganric flair First Published: October 1, 2019, 2:50 PM IST Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time.last_img read more

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Twitter reacts to Blake Griffin scoring career high 50 points against Philadelphia 76ers

first_imgBlake Griffin AND 1 for the lead with 2 seconds left. Makes free throw for FIFTY. pic.twitter.com/FtuBJGZxJf— Blake Wobffin (@WorldWideWob) October 24, 2018 Good shiiii @blakegriffin23 . I see you bruh bruh ✊🏾— CJ McCollum (@CJMcCollum) October 24, 2018 Advertisement 50-14-6 on 20/35, 5/10 from deep, game-winning And-One with 1.8 left in OT, just one turnover. Played smart and solid defense all game. What a night for Blake Griffin.— Zach Lowe (@ZachLowe_NBA) October 24, 2018 Taking GIF submissions to send to Joel Embiid after a hard-fought game.— Detroit Bad Boys ☠ (@detroitbadboys) October 24, 2018 Tonight, Blake Griffin became the first @DetroitPistons player since Isiah Thomas (46 PTS, 10 REB on Feb. 8, 1983) to put up 40+ PTS and 10+ REB in a game. pic.twitter.com/32TokPVJGC— NBA.com/Stats (@nbastats) October 24, 2018 “This is a statement game”@realgranthill33 and @IsiahThomas, who know a thing or two about #DetroitBasketball, react to Blake Griffin’s monster game and the undefeated @DetroitPistons!#GameTime pic.twitter.com/5fhoABuaAY— NBA TV (@NBATV) October 24, 2018 Bet Embiid’s already getting the IG post ready even though he lost, got baptized by Blake and locked up in OT by, of all souls, Zaza. https://t.co/Bjikg3r8IB— Brady Fredericksen (@Brady_Fred) October 24, 2018 This Pistons/ Sixers game though.. @blakegriffin23 playing out of this world!— Jamal Crawford (@JCrossover) October 24, 2018 Blake Griffin, ladies and gentlemen.FIFTY POINTS.— Detroit Pistons (@DetroitPistons) October 24, 2018 Holy shit, Blake Griffin. pic.twitter.com/gAjRmW7Mso— TrashTalk (@TrashTalk_fr) October 24, 2018 Blake Griffin joins #GameTime after his incredible 50-point performance!#DetroitBasketball pic.twitter.com/Sx1xIK4ZyX— NBA TV (@NBATV) October 24, 2018 Career-high 50 PTS ✅Game-winning bucket in OT ✅Take a bow, Blake Griffin! #DetroitBasketball pic.twitter.com/ueClqmDtI9— NBA TV (@NBATV) October 24, 2018 Lines of the Night 1) Blake Griffin: 50-14-6, W2) Anthony Davis: 34-13-2-1-5, W3) Joel Embiid: 33-11-7-0-3, LShouts: Harris— Josh Eberley (@JoshEberley) October 24, 2018 AdvertisementBlake Griffin led Detroit Pistons pulled a tremendous upset over Philadelphia 76ers who were playing without their star player Ben Simmons at the first week of NBA game at Little Caesars arena in Detroit, Michigan. Pistons beat 76ers by a 133-132 margin in a closely contested game.Blake Griffin emerged as the hero of the game as he scored a career-high 50 points, he scored 28 points on 12-for-17 shooting. The 29-year old played 14 rebounds and six assists.The Pistons are now 3-0 to start the season and Griffin is averaging 36.3 points, 5.7 assists and 11.3 rebounds a game in season 2018/19.Congrats @blakegriffin32 on scoring 50 tonight. Welcome to the 50 club brother ! Detroit Basketball (Mason Voice ) #holdat https://t.co/wPDKpWZQ71— Rip Hamilton (@ripcityhamilton) October 24, 2018 Blake Griffin going off for a 50-14-6 night while Chris Paul is currently suspended for an incident in which he got punched and spit on is some incredible flex on your ex type shit— sreekar (@sreekyshooter) October 24, 2018Also Read-James Harden puts on the style as he sinks in 9 3-pointers in warm up game Would be a shame if this @blakegriffin23 dunk on @JoelEmbiid made its way around the web pic.twitter.com/VJtzUMQ1ea— Isaac (@WorldofIsaac) October 24, 2018last_img read more

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Mahendra Singh Dhoni should play till 2019 World Cup: Virender Sehwag

first_imgMahendra Singh Dhoni can still torment the bowlers around the world for at least two-three years and can win more matches for India if he consistently bats at number four, former opener Virender Sehwag said on Monday.Dhoni batted at number four against Bangladesh in Asia Cup final last night and ended the match in a jiffy with a flurry of boundaries. (India’s Asia Cup win in photos)”If he bats at number four, it is good for the team. He can play fast bowlers and spinners with equal elan and knows when to slow down or accelerate. I have been saying it since 2015 World Cup. I am not saying that he won’t get out at that number but he can win more matches for India,” Sehwag said at Aaj Tak’s Salaam Cricket conclave. (Also read: India have a 99 per cent chance of winning World T20, says Virender Sehwag at Salaam Cricket) Dhoni, 34, has been facing questions on his retirement in the last few months, following a dip in form but the Indian captain has made it clear that he has no such plans.Sehwag said Dhoni must lead the side at least till 2019 50-over World Cup in England.”Dhoni can play for 2-3 years. Similar questions were asked in 2011 about Sachin Tendulkar but it (retirement) never happened. Dhoni can play till 2019 World Cup. He does not play Tests and he can manage his fitness,” the explosive batsman, who retired recently, opined. (MS Dhoni says he can still play the big shots)advertisementSehwag also pressed the point that there was no groupism in the team and there was no politics behind his ouster from the side.”There was no issue between me and Dhoni. It’s not compulsory that we always roam around together. In Australia, I, VVS Laxman and Gautam Gambhir were with our families. So we were spending time with them. It was all creation of media that there are differences among players,” he sought to clarify.”It was completely normal. A player is supported on the basis of performance. I was not playing well. I had not scored in the last 3-4 Tests as well as ODIs. We can’t drop a performer. Nobody can drop Rohit Sharma now,” he said.Many senior players are forcing their way back into the team like Ashish Nehra, Yuvraj Singh and Harbhajan Singh, asked if he could have done the same, Sehwag said, “I have announced my retirement. If not, the selectors could have considered me as well.”Sehwag also said that he does not see any batsman in the Indian side who could remind him of himself.”So far no one is there,” he said.last_img read more

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(REOPENS SPD22)

first_imgAt the pre-tournament press conference, Ronaldinho said he was feeling good to be back in India amongst a passionate and kind audience. “It will be unique experience to be playing against the best futsallers and my friends who I have played against in the past. I am delighted to back in a playing capacity this time and I would like to thank Premier Futsal for bringing back my memories from childhood of playing Futsal back home,” Ronaldinho said. Chennai 5s captain Falcao, who replaced Portuguese Deco at last minute because of injury, said, “Especially for the 5 kids who are a part of each team ? this could be a phenomenal learning experience. A lot of them would be playing alongside their sporting heroes and that should in itself be enough motivation to before to the best of their abilities and learn something from this Premier Futsal experience.” “I am honoured to sitting alongside this elite bunch of players and be playing against them in this debut season of Premier Futsal. This is a great concept and team have in mind to have legends from football, my colleagues from the Futsal world and these young Indian kids as a part of team,” he said. Mumbai 5s captain Ryan Giggs said Premier Futsal will be a different experience for me. “I would love to see how I fare amongst the best in the business of Futsal. Several countries across the world are now embracing Futsal at the academy level to improve the game of kids at a very young age. I am delighted that entrepreneurs in India could think of this concept of Premier Futsal and manage to put together all these Futsal players and of course, all these legends who I have grow up playing with,” said Giggs. Paul Scholes, marquee player and captain of Bengaluru 5s said he was surprised at the number of people who turned up at the airport to welcome the captains of six teams. “I was totally surprised at the number of people who turned up at airport to welcome us. I was told there are a lot of Manchester United fans here, but I was pleasantly surprised to know that it was beyond my expectations,” he said. “Through Premier Futsal, I hope we can showcase the importance of Futsal as a sport to the Indian fans. The thought of having the Indian players as a part of the playing team showcases the intent of the promoters to encourage the youth to take up Futsal. All of us here sincerely hope we can put together a season which will encourage more youngsters to come forth and pick up the sport as a profession.” Argentine forward Hernan Crespo, marquee player of Kolkata 5s, said, “I was delighted to see the preparedness with which they went about planning Premier Futsal and as a businessman myself, their conviction led me to believe this is could be a start of something really special in India. I am glad to be here and be playing in the inaugural edition of Premier Futsal.” PTI RE PDS PDSadvertisementlast_img read more

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Test specialists likely to tour New Zealand with India A squad ahead of Australia series

first_imgWould India have fared better in South Africa and England if they had opted for more match practice before the Test series? In hindsight, it seems like a rhetorical question.Coach Ravi Shastri met Board of Control for Cricket in India’s (BCCI) Committee of Administrators (CoA) after the England series and maintained what he has said publicly: “1-4 scoreline did not reflect the progress team has made.”But another defeat in Australia towards the end of the year would mean a hat-trick of away losses — something he would find hard to defend.The team management was bashed by former cricketers and pundits alike for their lack of practice and attitude in England before the Test series. India went to South Africa without playing a practice game and lost the series three-match series 1-2. Although the team played well, they failed to win important moments of play and ended up surrendering the series to the Proteas.In England, they did play a single warm-up game ahead of the Test series but same order followed. Virat Kohli’s men went down 1-4 despite putting up a good show. Shastri maintained that India are one of the best touring teams but also admitted that more practice would help in future tours.And, this time an arrangement is being made to prepare the Indian batsmen for the challenge that is going to be thrown at them in the form of Pat Cummins, Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood during their tour of Down Under later his year.advertisementWhile fitting in more practice games ahead of the four-match Test series starting December 6 has been spoken of, squeezing in two to three practice games in a 10 days between the T20 series and first Test would not be possible.Another alternative arrangement of getting some Test regulars to play in an A tour to New Zealand in November is being mooted. This would also give batsmen an opportunity to take the expertise of India ‘A’ coach Rahul Dravid.”The team management thought limited overs games were good enough to prepare for the test series in England. But that wasn’t enough. Now the New Zealand A tour will be in similar conditions to Australia and Rahul Dravid is more than willing to allow Test regulars space in the India A playing eleven to give them practice time. The batsmen in particular need to make the most of it,” a BCCI source in the know told India Today.The Indian team that lost in South Africa and England canceled a solitary practice game in South Africa and turned a scheduled four-day practice game in England to a three-day contest.However, assuming that Test regulars get some match practice time in New Zealand, the BCCI management team would still be left with simulating playing conditions like Australia and getting quality opposition to compete against.last_img read more

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Antlerless Deer Hunting Stamps Now Available

first_imgThe 2017 draw for stamps that permit hunting of antlerless deer is now open. Applications will be accepted until Aug. 31, at midnight. There are 5,000 antlerless deer hunting stamps available this year. “Deer hunting in Nova Scotia has a long tradition so we take care to ensure it is well-managed and sustainable,” said Natural Resources Minister Margaret Miller. “The annual draw for antlerless deer stamps is a key part of that effort.” Limiting the number of antlerless deer is a major part of sustainably managing the deer population. It requires careful consideration each year of things such as information submitted by hunters, various biological samples of deer, and complaints of nuisance deer. The application fee is $8.04, plus HST. Qualified hunters can apply online, using a credit card at: https://novascotia.ca/natr/draws/deerdraw/. They can also apply by calling 1-900-565-3337 to have the fee billed directly to their landline phone. An antlerless deer hunting stamp becomes valid when applied to a deer hunting licence and gives the hunter permission to hunt antlerless deer in the deer management zone specified on the stamp. This year, stamps are available for Zones 101, 103, 104, 106, 108, and 110. There are no antlerless stamps needed for Zones 102, 105, 107, or 109 this year as these zones are open to harvesting deer of either sex. Only bucks may be hunted in Zones 111 and 112 again this year. A computerized, random draw will take place on Sept. 1. Winners will be notified by mail so applicants are encouraged to confirm their mailing addresses when applying. Applicants can check their draw results online at, https://novascotia.ca/natr/draws/deerdraw/, beginning at noon on Sept. 2. More information, including zone descriptions, is also available on that website.last_img read more

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Jurors at LacMegantic trial complete Day 1 of deliberations

first_imgSHERBROOKE, Que. – The jurors at the trial of three men charged with criminal negligence causing death in the Lac-Megantic railway disaster completed their first day of deliberations Thursday without reaching a verdict or emerging to ask questions.Jurors are deliberating the fate of Tom Harding, Richard Labrie and Jean Demaitre, who are charged in connection with the July 2013 tragedy in which 47 people were killed when a runaway train carrying crude oil derailed and exploded.The three men pleaded not guilty.Harding was the train’s engineer, Labrie the traffic controller and Demaitre the manager of train operations.All three could be found guilty of criminal negligence causing the death of 47 people, while jurors have the option of convicting Harding on one of two other charges: dangerous operation of railway equipment or dangerous operation of railway equipment causing death.Quebec Superior Court Justice Gaetan Dumas rejected two requests during the trial — one from the defence and another from the Crown — details of which were kept from the jury.Now that the 12 jurors are sequestered until they reach a verdict, the two requests can be made public.The first came from the Crown, which asked to have entered into evidence a letter of suspension given to Harding in 2008 after he failed to properly secure a train, according to Dumas’ ruling.Dumas ruled that the prejudicial effect of the letter on jurors would have been greater than its value as evidence.The second request came from Harding, who wanted the court to enter into evidence declarations from witnesses who were interviewed by the Transportation Safety Board of Canada in connection with the derailment.Dumas ruled the witness statements were not admissible because they were based on hearsay.Thomas Walsh, one of Harding’s lawyers, told reporters Thursday the trial should never even have taken place.He said the evidence didn’t justify a criminal negligence charge and his client was targeted because of public pressure to blame someone for the tragedy.Harding is both “very anxious and very serene,” Walsh said.“I wouldn’t say he’s confident or he’s not confident. I think he’ll be very relieved when it’s over, one way or another, because it’s been a very difficult five years.”Walsh said the Crown’s own witnesses demonstrated that Montreal, Maine and Atlantic Railway, which owned the train that derailed, didn’t provide its employees with enough resources to maintain proper safety on its rail network.Harding’s legal team maintains their client’s actions were not a marked departure from the behaviour of a reasonable person in similar circumstances and did not reveal a reckless disregard for the lives of others.The Crown contends Harding failed to perform a proper brake test and didn’t apply enough handbrakes after he parked the 73-wagon convoy late on the night of July 5, 2013.Labrie and Demaitre are accused of failing to ask enough questions to ensure the train was properly secure after a fire broke out on the locomotive and firefighters shut off its engine, compromising the braking system.The trial began Oct. 2.last_img read more

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Florida House okays historic Bill allowing teachers to be armed

first_imgMiami (US): Florida’s House of Representatives on Wednesday approved a bill allowing teachers to carry firearms — a controversial step whose effectiveness in countering school shootings remains unproven. The aim of the measure, which was previously approved by the state’s Senate and now goes to Republican Governor Ron DeSantis’s desk, is the prevention of school shootings such as one that left 17 people dead at a high school in Parkland, Florida in February 2018. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince Salman ‘snubbed’ Pak PM Imran, recalled his private jet from US: ReportSupporters of the bill — which permits teachers to carry firearms on school campuses on a voluntary basis after they have completed 144 hours of training — say armed teachers could save lives in the event of a school shooting. But its opponents warn of the danger of accidents among teachers who would effectively be tasked with policing as well as education, and who, in the event of a school shooting, could be mistaken for a shooter by law enforcement. “Arming teachers is a recipe for disaster — a reckless plan which will complicate active-shooter situations,” Representative Val Demings, a Florida Democrat and former Orlando police chief, said of the measure. “The real solution is to keep guns out of the wrong hands,” Demings tweeted.last_img read more

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Most actively traded companies on the TSX TSX Venture Exchange

Most actively traded companies on the TSX, TSX Venture Exchange AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email by The Canadian Press Posted Jun 6, 2014 3:07 pm MDT TORONTO – Some of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange and the TSX Venture Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (14,838.90, up 38.72 points):Fortis Inc. (TSX:FTS.IR). Utilities. Down 35 cents, or 0.95 per cent, to $36.66 on 6.1 million shares.Kerr Mines Inc. (TSX:KER). Miner. Down 0.5 cents, or 16.67 per cent, to 2.5 cents on 5.6 million shares.Air Canada (TSX:AC.B). Airline. Up 54 cents, or 5.44 per cent, to $10.47 on 4.9 million shares. Shares rocketed to a 52-week high amid an upgrade from Walter Spracklin of RBC Capital Markets. He boosted his target price for the airline by nearly 42 per cent to $17, saying the carrier is undergoing a fundamental and structural cost reduction initiative that is playing out in a climate of steadily increasing demand for air travel.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Aerospace. Up nine cents, or 2.41 per cent, to $3.82 on 4.8 million shares.Osisko Mining Corp. (TSX:OSK). Miner. Up seven cents, or 0.86 per cent, to $8.25 on 3.4 million shares.Thompson Creek Metals Company Inc. (TSX:TCM). Miner. Down six cents, or 1.90 per cent, to $3.09 on 3.2 million shares.Toronto Venture Exchange (987.45, up 1.53 points):Terra Firma Resources Inc. (TSXV:TFR). Miner. Down 0.5 cents, or 25 per cent, to 1.5 cents on 3.3 million shares.Patient Home Monitoring Corp. (TSXV:PHM). Medical devices. Up two cents, or 7.69 per cent, to 28 cents on 3.2 million shares. read more

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Timbers and Sporting KC open conference finals with 00 draw

PORTLAND, Ore. — Tim Melia made six saves and Sporting Kansas City survived Portland’s aggressive attack for a 0-0 draw Sunday in the opening leg of Major League Soccer’s Western Conference finals.The Timbers outshot Sporting 14-9 and had six shots on target but couldn’t break through. Portland goalkeeper Jeff Attinella made one save. The teams now head to Kansas City for the second leg on Thursday.Atlanta United beat the New York Red Bulls 3-0 in the first leg of the Eastern Conference finals earlier Sunday.Sporting finished the season as the top seed in the Western Conference and earned a knockout-round bye before a 5-3 win on aggregate over Real Salt Lake in the conference semifinals.The Timbers, the only team that played a knockout round match that remains in the playoffs, advanced to the conference final on penalties (4-2) to cap a wild semifinal with Cascadia rival Seattle.Sporting was without forward Diego Rubio for the opening leg because of yellow card accumulation. He was replaced in the starting lineup by Khiry Shelton.Graham Zusi, who was questionable going into the match because of a thigh injury, was in Sporting’s starting lineup. Zusi has played every minute of the 2018 season so far.The Timbers were without Andy Polo because of a calf strain he sustained on the international break. Dairon Asprilla started in his place. Forward Samuel Armenteros was not available because of back spasms.Portland was hurt when defender Larrys Mabiala left with a non-contact injury to his right leg in the 18th minute. He was replaced by Bill Tuiloma.The Timbers saw a good chance early, but Jorge Villafana’s blast in the six minute hit the post. Liam Ridgewell’s header in first-half stoppage time was punched away by Sporting goalkeeper Tim Melia.Portland appeared to score in the 70th minute but David Guzman’s rebound goal was called offside and VAR confirmed it.Kansas City, which won MLS Cup titles in 2000 and 2013, led the Western Conference (and was second in the league) with 65 regular-season goals, a club record.The Timbers won the MLS title in 2015. Last season Portland was eliminated from the playoffs in the conference semifinal against Houston and afterward coach Caleb Porter and the Timbers parted ways. The Timbers are playing their first season under Giovanni Savarese.The winners of the conference finals meet in the MLS Cup final on Dec. 8.Anne M. Peterson, The Associated Press read more

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Several Irish flights affected after British Airways cancels UK services over pilot

first_imgSeveral Irish flights affected after British Airways cancels UK services over pilot pay dispute The carrier is currently locked in a pay dispute with its 4,300 pilots. 2 Comments Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Sep 9th 2019, 7:41 AM 10,081 Views Image: PA Wire/PA Images https://jrnl.ie/4801071 Monday 9 Sep 2019, 7:41 AMcenter_img British Airways aircraft at London’s Heathrow airport (file photo) Image: PA Wire/PA Images British Airways aircraft at London’s Heathrow airport (file photo) PASSENGERS ON several Irish flights face disruption today after British Airways cancelled almost all services from UK airports on the first day of a strike by the airline’s pilots.The carrier is locked in a pay dispute with its 4,300 pilots, and the strike could affect the travel plans of nearly 300,000 people around the world.Several flights into and out of Dublin Airport are among those affected today, as is one arrival and one departure from Shannon Airport.“After many months of trying to resolve the pay dispute, we are extremely sorry that it has come to this,” British Airways said in a statement today.The airline said it remains willing to return to talks with the British Airline Pilots Association (BALPA).“Unfortunately, with no detail from BALPA on which pilots would strike, we had no way of predicting how many would come to work or which aircraft they are qualified to fly, so we had no option but to cancel nearly 100 percent of our flights”.BALPA has rejected a pay increase of 11.5 percent over three years that the airline proposed in July.BA says the offer would see flight captains receive “world-class” pay and benefits of around £200,000 (€220,000) a year.It also points out that two other unions representing 90 percent of the airlines’ workers have accepted the 11.5-percent raise.But in response, BALPA said that co-pilots’ salaries average around £70,000 (€77,800) – with the pay of junior pilots falling to just £26,000 (€28,900).The lower level of pay leaves some pilots in heavy debt, since they are required to undergo training that the BBC estimates to be priced at around £100,000 (€111,000).BALPA also points to a nearly 10-percent jump in pre-tax profits reported by BA’s parent company IAG last year.Pilots are to continue their strike on Tuesday and are threatening to strike for another day on 27 September – and then possibly again closer to the winter holidays – if the dispute continues.Passengers who may be affected are advised to check online to see whether they are affected by today’s cancellations.With reporting from – © AFP 2019 By Stephen McDermott Short URL Share6 Tweet Email last_img read more

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Un nouveau ptérosaure baptisé en lhonneur de la petite fille qui la

first_imgUn nouveau ptérosaure baptisé en l’honneur de la petite fille qui l’a découvertDes paléontologues américains viennent de décrire une toute nouvelle espèce de ptérosaure, des vertébrés volants qui vivaient il y a plus de 65 millions d’années. L’espèce a été baptisée Vectidraco daisymorrisae en l’honneur de Daisy Morris, la petite fille de 4 ans qui a permis sa mise au jour. Les nouvelles espèces sont parfois difficiles à baptiser mais cette fois-ci les paléontologues n’ont pas hésité bien longtemps. Une nouvelle espèce de ptérosaure vient tout juste d’être décrite et a logiquement pris le nom de sa découvreuse : une petite fille de 4 ans ! C’est en 2009 que tout a commencé lorsque Daisy Morris, une habitante de l’île de Wight, au sud de l’Angleterre, a trébuché sur un os lors d’une ballade sur la plage. Piquée de curiosité, la petite fille s’est alors mis à creuser le sable et en a extirpé des os noircis. La famille Morris, intriguée par la découverte, s’est tourné vers Martin Simpson, un spécialiste des fossiles de l’université de Southampton, pour lui demander son expertise. Et aussitôt, le professeur a su qu’il a affaire à quelque chose de très spécial. Après avoir étudié les ossements, les résultats ont été formels : il s’agit-là d’une nouvelle espèce de petit ptérosaure, un reptile volant de la période du Crétacé (jusqu’à il y a 65 millions d’années).Un ptérosaure de la taille d’une mouette En hommage à l’auteur de cette découverte, les paléontologues ont décidé de baptiser la nouvelle espèce Vectidraco (qui signifie dragon de l’île de Wight) daisymorrisae qu’ils ont décrite en détail dans une étude parue dans la revue PLoS ONE. Selon leurs observations, ce ptérosaure avait probablement une envergure de 75 centimètres et mesurait environ 35 centimètres du museau à la queue. “En d’autres termes, il était similaire en taille à une mouette ou à un grand corbeau. Il était probablement huppé, et montrait des proportions au niveau des membres qui lui permettaient d’être un marcheur et un coureur raisonnablement bon au sol et un expert en vol dans les habitats encombrés de type forêt”,  explique le Dr Darren Naish, principal auteur de l’étude cité par Sci-News. D’après les paléontologues, l’espèce est très proche des spécimens de la famille des Tapejaridae appartenant au groupe des Azhdarchoidea. Des vertébrés qui ont été découverts au Brésil, en Espagne et en Chine notamment.”Les Azhdarchoidea font partie, selon moi, des ptérosaures les plus intéressants. Tous existaient au Crétacé, n’avaient pas de dents, et nombre d’entre eux étaient particulièrement bien adapté à la vie dans des environnements terrestres, tels que des régions boisées, des forêts tropicales ou des plaines inondables”, ajoute le paléontologue. Mais s’il n’avait pas été découvert, l’ossement du ptérosaure aurait sûrement fini en pleine mer ou détruit par l’érosion. C’est pourquoi les chercheurs sont d’autant plus reconnaissants envers la petite Daisy.Une apprentie paléontologue pour une découverte majeure À lire aussiMaladie de Charcot : symptômes, causes, traitement, où en est on ?”Elle a un très bon oeil pour les tout petits fossiles, elle a trouvé ces petits os noirs dépassant de la boue et elle a décidé de creuser un peu plus loin et les a tous mis au jour”, se souvient sa mère Mme Morris, professeur assistant avant d’ajouter “nous sommes tous très fiers d’elle”. Pour Martin Simpson, ceci est un exemple criant de comment “des découvertes majeures peuvent être faites par des amateurs”.  D’ailleurs, l’historie ne s’arrête pas là puisque la confirmation de Vectidraco daisymorrisae est arrivée une semaine après, seulement, que le squelette quasi complet d’un dinosaure de 3,50 mètres ait été trouvé sur l’île. Le spécimen de ptérosaure quant à lui, a été légué au Natural History Museum de Londres.Le 25 mars 2013 à 15:51 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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2 arrested after armed subject allegedly threatens woman in Sweetwater

first_imgSWEETWATER, Fla. (WSVN) — Police took two male juveniles into custody after, officials said, an armed subject threatened a woman in a residential neighborhood in Sweetwater, Sunday afternoon.Multiple agencies, including Sweetwater Police, Miami-Dade Police and the Florida Highway Patrol, responded to the scene of the incident near Northwest 110th Avenue and Seventh Street.Authorities set up a perimeter and blocked off several blocks for hours.Sunday night, 7News cameras showed several officers putting one of juveniles in a police cruiser. They were both placed in handcuffs and taken away.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img read more

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Carnaval on the Mile celebrates 20th anniversary

first_imgCarnaval on the MileLive from the Heineken Stage https://t.co/4g2PfYgNOD— Carnaval On The Mile (@CarnavalMile) March 3, 2018The celebration hosts two concert stages, a mile of paintings, crafts, photography and fine jewelry.The free two-day event is a cultural experience for the enjoyment of all age groups.Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. CORAL GABLES, FLA. (WSVN) – Carnaval on the Mile is celebrating two decades of fun for the entire family, Saturday.The festival, held along Coral Gables’ Miracle Mile, is a weekend-long showcase of art, world music, fine cuisine and children’s entertainment.last_img read more

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Measuring Your App Usage

first_imgWhat Gets Measured?Metrics are similar to what publishers have been tracking on the Web, plus a few extra unique to the mobile platform: unique users, unique sessions, type of device, OS version, as well as location-based metrics.There are three macro areas to focus on:Interaction Rate: This is the rate of people who have downloaded the app and actually use it. If your app produces a high volume of dynamic content, you’d want to see a corresponding interaction rate.Engagement Rate: The next step beyond interaction. What are users looking at and reading? You want to track what sections of content users are reading, how many stories within that section are getting read, and so on.Feedback: This, says Peterson, is what more publishers should be doing. “Have a feedback mechanism,” he says. “Let users have that conversation in the app and then measure the net negative and positive feedback.”There are plenty of ways to drill deeper—what’s getting read, which writers are the most read, and so on—but the platform is so new, publishers should for now be concentrating on what works and what doesn’t.Transparency and ParticipationSarah Ohrvall, who just swapped her leadership role at Bonnier’s Swedish R&D group to head up R&D for the U.S. division, has taken a dual approach to analytics. Ohrvall has spearheaded Bonnier’s development of the Mag+ platform, which Popular Science uses for its iPad edition and which also has its own analytics capabilities baked right in—a prescient move given the recent problems posed to developers by Apple which is currently, according to the language in its Developer Agreement for its upcoming 4.0 operating system, barring third-party in-app measurement software.Ohrvall says analytics can work to the benefit of the publisher and the consumer. She’s looking forward to a day where users can present a “media consumption profile.” In other words, the analytics that are collected on the back end to help drive content, usage and design decisions for the publisher can also be used to enhance user experience and identity, creating a social aspect around content consumption. “Creative publishers can display that data in an interesting way to the consumer,” she says. “We’re trying to find ways to collect analytics that will be a benefit to the user.”More Than Just MetricsMeasuring key interaction and engagement metrics is one thing, says Ohrvall, but those will only go so far. “Of course you need metrics, but [time spent] won’t give you all the right numbers. You can measure what they do, but you can’t see what they don’t do and want to do. This is completely new. We need to understand the behavior behind the numbers,” she says.In that sense, Ohrvall has set a priority to learn about behavior in a context outside of the device itself—in the inherently participatory Web. The transparency of Mag+ carries over to product development as well. Product videos have been posted to the Web. Bloggers are given a peek at production and encouraged to offer opinions and foster discussion. Meanwhile, Ohrvall is watching the Web conversation closely. “We’re getting lots of useful feedback,” she says. “We’re tapping into people’s understanding of the media and their reactions to using it.”On top of that are layered the quantitative tactics and focus groups. “The Web has evolved into a participatory culture and there are ways to use that,” says Ohrvall. Publishers developing apps for mobile and tablet devices have some choices among analytics service providers—as well as some strategic decisions about how that data will be used.Developers can embed third-party measurement software that is integrated and shipped with the app and tracks a variety of usage patterns. The landscape of service providers ranges from outfits like Omniture, WebTrends and Google Analytics, to smaller firms such as Flurry, Localytics and Motally.The bigger providers offer mobile measurement as an add-on to the Web-measurement services publishers may already be getting from them. “It basically prices the same as your fixed Internet,” says Eric Peterson, founder of Web analytics consulting firm Web Analytics Demystified. “You’re tracking events, pages views or clicks, but you basically pay the same rate for mobile apps.”The smaller firms, and Google Analytics, offer free measurement capabilities as well as more robust, fee-based enterprise versions. Localytics, for example, bases their enterprise pricing on the number of active users in any given month. This number can fluctuate, and publishers tend to begin with the free services to benchmark usage before upgrading to an enterprise-level service.last_img read more

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